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Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

Department of English

Department of English

Department of English

Faculty & Staff

Linda Bensel-Meyers

Linda Bensel-Meyers

Associate Professor, Department Chair
PhD, University of Oregon
Areas: Renaissance literature, especially drama and rhetoric; history of rhetoric and composition
Phone: 303-871-2859  / Office: 486A
Email: lbenselm@du.edu

More about Dr. Bensel-Meyers

Linda Bensel-Meyers studied dramatic theory at the University of Chicago (BA 1975) and Renaissance drama and rhetoric at the University of Oregon (PhD 1985). From 1986-2003, she directed the Writing Programs at the University of Tennessee, where she uncovered systematic academic fraud in the athletic program. In 1999, she released documents to The New York Times and ESPN to expose the need for college athletic reform. Her reform efforts included speaking nationally, including before the Knight Commission on Collegiate Sports, and as keynote speaker for the National Institute for Sports Reform. Her awards include the distinguished Service Award from the International Scholar-Athlete Hall of Fame and the Robert M. Hutchins Award for Academic Integrity. She came to DU in 2003.

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Clark Davis

Professor
PhD, SUNY-Buffalo
Areas: New England tradition; American literature and religion; literature and philosophy.
Phone: 303-871-2900 / Office: 487B
Email: cldavis@du.edu

More about Dr. Davis

Clark Davis came to DU in 2000. His primary areas of interest include early and nineteenth-century American literature, particularly the New England tradition. He regularly teaches courses on the American Puritans, early American poetics, the Transcendentalists, and the American novel and short story.

Prof. Davis’s research has been devoted primarily to major figures of the mid-nineteenth century, Melville and Hawthorne in particular. In recent years, however, he has devoted more time to the twentieth century, completing the first full-length literary biography of William Goyen, author of The House of Breath and Arcadio. For more information see: https://portfolio.du.edu/cldavis

Ann Dobyns

Ann Dobyns

Professor, Associate Department Chair
PhD, University of Oregon
Areas: Medieval literature; rhetoric and composition
Phone: 303-871-2890 / Office: 486B
Email: adobyns@du.edu

More about Dr. Dobyns

Ann Dobyns is Professor of Rhetoric and Medieval Literature. She teaches classes on rhetoric, Chaucer, and the rhetoric of tango. She is the author of The Voices of Romance: Studies in Dialogue and Character (1989) and co-author, with Patsy Callaghan, of Literary Conversation: Thinking, Talking, and Writing about Literature (1996), A Meeting of Minds: A Brief Rhetoric for Writers and Readers (2004), A Meeting of Minds: Strategies for Academic Inquiry and Writing 2nd ed. (2007), and essays on rhetoric, pedagogy, and Middle English literature. Her current research is a study of the rhetoric of tango.

Donna Beth Ellard

Donna Beth Ellard

Assistant Professor
PhD, University of California-Santa Barbara
Areas: Medieval Literature; Old English poetry
Phone: 303-871-2901 / Office: 487A
Email: donna.ellard@du.edu

More about Dr. Ellard

Donna Beth Ellard is an Assistant Professor of Medieval Literature, specializing Old English poetry. Her research and teaching interests are eclectic and include Anglo-Saxon literature, archaeology, and historiography; biolinguistics and biosemiotics; and psychoanalysis and Deleuze studies. She is currently at work on a manuscript titled Anglo-Saxon Bodies, English Minds, and post-Saxon Futures

Rachel Feder

Rachel Feder

Assistant Professor
PhD, University of Michigan
Areas: Romanticism
Phone: 303-871-2755  / Office: 487E
Email: rachel.feder@du.edu

More about Dr. Feder

Rachel Feder is an assistant professor of nineteenth-century British literature focused on Romantic poetry. Her work rethinks the history of literary experiment within a broad intellectual-historical framework that includes mathematical debates, daily writing, and contemporary poetry. Rachel’s articles have appeared or are forthcoming in journals including ELH, Studies in Romanticism, and Romantic Circles Pedagogy Commons; she is also the author of a poetry chapbook from dancing girl press.

Graham Foust

Graham Foust

Assistant Professor, Director of Undergraduate Studies
PhD, SUNY-Buffalo; MFA, George Mason University
Areas: poetry, poetics, translation
Phone: 303-871-2860 / Office: 486C
Email: graham.foust@du.edu

More about Dr. Foust

I was born in Knoxville, Tennessee; raised in Eau Claire, Wisconsin; and educated at Beloit College, George Mason University, and the University at Buffalo. My scholarly and creative interests are poetry and poetics; 19th- and 20th-century American literature; and critical theory. Kids: check; pets: nyet. I’m fond of skiing, eating, Big Star, Loretta Lynn, and the semicolon

Jan Gorak

Jan Gorak

Professor
PhD, University of Southern California
Areas: Late 18th- and 20th-Century British and American literature; history of literary theory and criticism
Phone: 303-871-2909 / Office: 386D
Email: jgorak@du.edu

More about Dr.Gorak

Jan Gorak is a native of Northern England who studied in England and the United States.  His books include God the Artist and The Making of the Modern Canon and he has also edited volumes on the canon debate and Northrop Frye’s cultural criticism.  His articles and reviews have appeared in Modern Language Review, Comparative Literary Studies, Scottish Literary Review, the Cambridge History of Literary Criticism and he has lectured widely in Europe and Canada.   

Eric Gould

Eric Gould

PhD, University of London (King's College)
Areas: 20th century literature in English and in translation; cultural studies
Phone: 303-871-4571 / Office: 485
Email: egould@du.edu

More about Dr. Gould
Eric Gould is Professor of English at the University of Denver, Colorado, USA, where his primary teaching and research interests are in 20th and 21st century literature and cultural studies.  He graduated with BA and MA (Hons) degrees from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, and with the PhD in English from King’s College London.  Apart from teaching in the English Department, he has held several administrative positions including Vice Provost and Dean of Graduate Studies and Vice Provost for Internationalization, as well as chairing the English Department twice.  He also served for three years as Vice President for Academic Affairs at Drew University, New Jersey.  He is the author/editor of eight books, and his work has appeared in a number of journals, including the London Times Literary Supplement, the Times Higher Education Supplement, the New York Times Book Review, and Higher Education in Europe.   His most recent book, The University in a Corporate Culture (Yale 2003) won the 2004 Frandson Prize for Literature from the UCEA.  He is currently working on a study of  ethics, cosmopolitanism, and academic internationalization.

Tayana Hardin

Assistant Professor
PhD, University of Michigan
20th Century African American literature; Gender Studies; Performance Art
Phone: 303-871-2860 / Office: 486F
Email: Tayana.Hardin@du.edu

Karla Heeps

Karla Heeps

Assistant to the Chair (since 2008)
Phone: 303-871-2742 / Office; English Suite 495B
Email: kheeps@du.edu

Doug Hesse

Doug Hesse

Professor, Director of the University Writing Program
PhD, University of Iowa
Areas: Rhetoric and composition; writing program administration; creative nonfiction
Phone: 303-871-7447 / Office: Shopneck Writing Center Room 280, Anderson Academic Commons
Email: dhesse@du.edu

More about Dr. Hesse

Doug Hesse is Professor and founding Executive Director of Writing at the University of Denver, where he was named University Distinguished Scholar.  Hesse is currently President-Elect of the National Council of Teachers of English.  Previously, he chaired the Conference on College Composition and Communication, was President of the Council of Writing Program Administrators, and held leadership roles within MLA.  He spent 20 years at Illinois State University, where he directed the writing program, the Center for the Advancement of Teaching, and the University Honors Program.  Hesse’s numerous articles and four co-authored books focus on creative nonfiction and the personal essay; on narrative, rhetoric, and belles lettres; and on professional issues in writing programs.  He’s been keynote or plenary speaker at some forty conferences, and he has consulted and completed program reviews at some fifty colleges and universities.  His current projects include a longitudinal study of 60 undergraduate writers, archival work on the correspondence of the first astronomer at the University of Denver, a collection of personal essays, and a defense of journalism in composition studies.  Hesse’s PhD is from Iowa. He’s an avid hiker and photographer, and he sings professionally with the Colorado Symphony Orchestra Chorus. 

Scott Howard

Scott Howard

Associate Professor
PhD, University of Washington 
Areas:  Renaissance & early modern literature and culture; modern & postmodern American poetry; poetics & historiography; literary & cultural theory; digital humanities
Phone: 303-871-2887 / Office: 387E
Email: showard@du.edu
Portfolio

More about Dr. Howard

W. Scott Howard received his Ph.D. in English and Critical Theory from the University of Washington. His teaching, research, and publications engage the fields of Renaissance and early modern literature & culture, modern and postmodern American poetry, poetics and historiography, literary & cultural theory, and digital humanities. He teaches in the Department of English and also in the Emergent Digital Practices Program, the University Honors Program, the Gender and Women’s Studies Program, and the DU-Iliff Ph.D. Program. Professor Howard is the recipient of fellowships and grants from the Modern Language Association, the Pew Charitable Trusts, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Yale University. 

Portfolio:

Laird Hunt

Laird Hunt

Associate Professor; Editor of Denver Quarterly
MFA, Naropa University
Areas: Fiction writing; postmodern literature
Phone: 393-871-2885 / Office: 387C
Email: lhunt@du.edu

More about Professor Hunt

Laird Hunt is the award-winning author of a book of short stories, mock parables and histories, The Paris Stories (2000), originally from Smokeproof Press, though now re-released by Marick Press, and five novels from Coffee House Press: The Impossibly (2001), Indiana, Indiana (2003), The Exquisite (2006) Ray of the Star (2009) and Kind One (2012), which was a finalist for both the 2013 Pen/Faulkner award and the 2013 Pen USA Literary Award in Fiction and the winner of a 2013 Anisfield-Wolf Book Award for Fiction. A new novel, Neverhome, will be published in the United States by Little, Brown and by Chatto in the UK. His translation of Oliver Rohe’s Vacant Lot was published by Counterpath Press, who also published his co-translation with Anne-Laure Tissut of Arno Bertina’s Brando, My Solitude. He is published in France by Actes Sud, and has novels either published or forthcoming in Japan, Italy, Spain, Germany and Turkey. His writings, reviews and translations have appeared in the United States and abroad in, among other places, the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, McSweeney’s, Ploughshares, Bomb, Bookforum, Grand Street, The Believer, Fence, Conjunctions, Brick, Mentor, Inculte, and Zoum Zoum. On faculty in the University of Denver’s Creative Writing Program since 2004, where he edits the Denver Quarterly, he has had residencies at the MacDowell Colony and the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France, and was in residence at Marfa (Lannan Foundation) this past summer.

Brian Kiteley

Brian Kiteley

Professor
MA, City College of New York
Areas: Fiction writing; travel writing; postcolonial fiction; historical fiction
Phone: 303-871-2898 / Office: 487C
Email: bkiteley@du.edu

More about Professor Kiteley

Brian Kiteley is the author of three novels, Still Life with Insects, I Know Many Songs, But I Cannot Sing, and The River Gods. He’s also published two collections of fiction exercises, The 3 A.M. Epiphany and The 4 A.M. Breakthrough. He has received Guggenheim, Whiting, and NEA fellowships. Kiteley recently finished The Liar's Paradox, a novel set in Crete in 1988, about love, sun, sex, and the CIA, with cameos by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard

Eleanor McNees

Eleanor McNees

Professor
PhD, University of Colorado-Boulder 
Areas: Victorian and modern British literature; Virginia Woolf
Phone: 303-871-2855 / Office: 486C
Email: emcnees@du.edu

More about Dr. McNees

Eleanor McNees is Professor of English specializing in 19th and 20th century British literature with an emphasis on Virginia Woolf and her Victorian predecessors. She received her BA from Colgate University, her MA from Northwestern University and her PhD from the University of Colorado, Boulder. In addition to her book, Eucharistic Poetry, she has edited collections of essays on the history of the novel, the Brontë sisters and Virginia Woolf, as well as an annotated edition of Virginia Woolf’s penultimate novel, The Years.  Her essays have appeared in a variety of journals from Victorian Periodicals Review to the Dickens Quarterly

Maik Nwosu 2

Maik Nwosu

Associate Professor
PhD, Syracuse University
Areas: African, African Diaspora, postcolonial, and world literatures; fiction and poetry; semiotics and critical theory.
Phone: 303-871-2879 / Office: 387A
Email: mnwosu@du.edu

More about Dr. Nwosu

Maik Nwosu is an associate professor of African and world literature. He worked as a journalist (and received the Nigeria Media Merit Award for Journalist of the Year) before moving to Syracuse University, New York for a Ph.D in English and Textual Studies. His research areas include African, African Diaspora, postcolonial, and world literatures; fiction, non-fiction, and poetry; semiotics and critical theory. Nwosu is a fellow of the Akademie Schloss Solitude, Stuttgart, Germany and the Civitella Ranieri Center in Umbertide, Italy, as well as a member of the Phi Beta Delta Honor Society for International Scholars.

Bin Ramke

Bin Ramke

Professor and Phipps Chair
PhD, Ohio University 
Areas: Creative writing, poetry; 20th century literature; contemporary poetry; visual arts and literature; issues of science and mathematics in contemporary thought and writing
Phone: 303-871-2889 / Office: 384
Email: bramke@du.edu

Adam Rovner

Adam Rovner

Associate Professor, Director of Graduate Studies
PhD, Indiana University; MA, Hebrew University, Jerusalem, Israel
Areas: American Jewish literature and culture; modern Hebrew literature; narrative theory; literature & Jewish nationalisms, translation.
Phone: 303-871-2861 / Office: 387D
Email: adam.rovner@du.edu

More about Dr. Rovner

Adam Rovner is Associate Professor of English and Jewish Literature. He came to DU in 2008 after serving as Assistant Professor of Hebrew and Director of the Hebrew Program at Hofstra University (2006-08), and Assistant Professor at the DigiPen Institute of Technology (2005-06). Adam received his M.A. in comparative literature from the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (1998) and his Ph.D. from Indiana University-Bloomington (2003). His articles, essays, translations and interviews have appeared in numerous scholarly journals and general interest publications. His book, In the Shadow of Zion: Promised Lands Before Israel is forthcoming from NYU Press (2014). For more information, please see: www.adamrovner.com

selah saterstrom coffee house

Selah Saterstrom

Associate Professor, Director of Creative Writing
MFA, Goddard College
Areas: Creative writing, fiction; philosophy and literature
Phone: 303-871-2902 / Office: 387B
Email: selah.saterstrom@du.edu

Eleni Sikelianos

Eleni Sikelianos

Professor
MFA, Naropa University
Areas: Creative writing, poetry, translation, creative nonfiction; 20th century and contemporary poetry; modernist women
Phone: 303-871-3136 / Office: 487D
Email: esikelia@du.edu

stratton book

Billy Stratton

Assistant Professor, Director of Undergraduate Studies/Honors
PhD, University of Arizona
Areas: 20th/21st century American/Native American literature and poetics, Indian captivity narratives, apocalyptic literature, ecocriticism, continental philosophy, creative writing, and film studies.
Phone: 303-871-4157 / Office: 486D
Email: billy.stratton@du.edu
 More about Dr. Stratton

For more on Dr. Stratton, please see his portfolio site.

Barbara Wilcots

Barbara Wilcots

Associate Professor and Associate Provost for Graduate Studies
PhD, University of Denver
Areas: 20th century American literature, especially African-American, Caribbean and postcolonial literatures
Phone: 303-871-2057
Email: bwilcots@du.edu