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Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

Department of Sociology & Criminology

Phillips

Faculty & Staff

Scott Phillips

Phillips headshot

Scott Phillips

Associate Professor 
Sturm Hall 418
Phone: 303-871-2059
Email: Scott.Phillips@du.edu
View CV

 

 


 

areas of expertise/research interests


Capital Punishment and Conflict Management

professional biography


Scott Phillips is an Associate Professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminology. His research examines capital punishment and conflict management. Focusing on the arbitrary administration of the death penalty in Houston, his recent research has been featured in several media outlets including: the New York Times, the Houston Chronicle, the Dallas Morning News, Mother Jones, and the Death Penalty Information Center. 

education


PhD    Sociology, University of Georgia, 2000
MA     Sociology, Louisiana State University, 1996
BA      History, Texas Christian University, 1993

selected publications


Lin, Jeffrey and Scott Phillips. 2014. "Media coverage of capital murder: Exceptions sustain the rule." Justice Quarterly 31(5): 934-959.

Phillips, Scott. 2009. "Status disparities in the capital of capital punishment." Law and Society Review 43(4): 807-837.

Phillips, Scott. 2009. "Legal disparities in the capital of capital punishment." Journal of Criminal Law and Criminology 99(3):717-756.

Phillips, Scott. 2008. "Racial disparities in the capital of capital punishment." Houston Law Review 45(3):807-840.

Phillips, Scott, Jacqueline Hagan, and Nestor Rodriguez. 2006. "Brutal borders? Examining the treatment of deportees during arrest and detention." Social Forces 85(1):93-110.

Phillips, Scott and Mark Cooney. 2005. "Aiding peace, abetting violence: Third parties and the management of conflict." American Sociological Review 70(2):334-354.

Phillips, Scott. 2003. "The social structure of vengeance: A test of Black's model." Criminology 41(3):673-708.

Phillips, Scott and Ryken Grattet. 2000. "Judicial rhetoric, meaning-making, and the institutionalization of hate crime law." Law and Society Review 34 (3):567-606.