Skip navigation

Urban Studies

Degree Programs

Urban Studies

Faculty

FACULTY

William Anderson

Eric Boschmann, PhD

Associate Professor, Geography
Boettcher Center West, 106
2050 E. Iliff Ave.
Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-4387
eric.boschman@du.edu

More..

PhD, Ohio State University

Areas of specialization include: urban geography; the economic and transportation dimensions of social inequalities in cities; urban sustainability; mixed methodologies, including spatial analysis, geographic information science (GIS), and qualitative techniques.

Courses taught: Urban Landscapes

William Anderson

Bernadette Marie Calafell, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Communication Studies
Sturm Hall, Room 291
2000 East Asbury Ave
Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-4322
Email:bernadette.calafell@du.edu

More..

PhD University of North Carolina

Bernadette Marie Calafel is Professor of Communication Studies. Her research is focused within queer of color theories and women of color feminisms. Working from a performance and critical rhetorical perspective her scholarship is focused on Chicanx and Latinx communities. She is author of Latina/o Communication Studies: Theorizing Performance and co-editor of Latina/o Discourse in Vernacular Spaces: Somos de Una Voz.  Her most recent book, Monstrosity, Performance and Race in Contemporary Culture examines how monstrosity comes to signify Otherness in popular culture and everyday life.

William Anderson

Andy Goetz, PhD

Professor, Chair of Geography
Boettcher Center West, Room 117
2050 E. Iliff Ave
Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2674
Email: agoetz@du.edu

More..

PhD, Ohio State University

Areas of specialization include urban geography, urban and regional planning, urban transportation planning, land use, and economic geography.

Andrew R. Goetz is a Professor in the Department of Geography and the Intermodal Transportation Institute at the University of Denver. His research and teaching interests include urban geography, urban and regional planning, urban transportation planning, land use, and economic geography. Most of Dr. Goetz' research has been in the transportation field, including studies on transportation planning at metropolitan planning organizations and state departments of transportation, airport planning, and the airline industry. He has conducted research on the linkages between transportation and urbanization at the global scale as well as relationships between transportation and urban form at the local scale. Dr. Goetz also has research interests in issues of neighborhood change, environmental justice, and regional economic development.

Dr. Goetz has worked with a number of graduate students on urban-related research projects including studies of affordable housing, gated communities, use of urban trails and adjacent land use, light rail transit and land use, geography of migration into Colorado, hazardous waste sites and nearby residential areas, spatial patterns and socioeconomic factors related to health in metropolitan areas, effects of beltways on land use, and school desegregation.

Dr. Goetz currently teaches a course on Urban Landscapes that focuses on topics such as worldwide urbanization and globalization processes; the study of cities as nodes within global, regional, and national urban systems; the internal spatial structure of land uses within cities; the spatial dimensions of economic, social, political, and cultural processes in cities; and environmental elements, involving human interrelationships with the natural environment in an urban setting. He also teaches a course on Urban and Regional Planning that introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of planning, and addresses such topics as planning theory; the history of planning; contemporary planning processes; and the legal, political, economic, social, and environmental aspects of planning.

Joyce D. Goodfriend, PhD

Professor, Department of History
Sturm Hall, Room 371
2000 E. Asbury Ave
Denver, CO 80208

More..

PhD, UCLA

Dr. Goodfriend researches urban life in early America, with a particular focus on relations between ethnic, racial and religious groups. She is the author of Before the Melting Pot: Society and Culture in Colonial New York City, 1664-1730 (Princeton University Press, 1992) as well as numerous essays. Her courses on Immigrants in Modern America frequently examine immigrants in urban settings. She is a member of the North American Editorial Board of the journal Urban History published by Cambridge University Press.

William Anderson

Carol Helstosky, PhD

Associate Professor, European Cultural History
Sturm Hall, Room 368
2000 E. Asbury Ave.
Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-3987
Email: chelstos@du.edu

More..

Carol Helstosky is an Associate Professor of History at the University of Denver, where she teaches European cultural history, as well as service learning courses in history and thesis writing seminar. She teaches "History in the Community," a course where students use their skills as historians to assist community partners, through teaching and research. Her research is in the field of Italian history, where she has published numerous articles and several books, including: Garlic and Oil: Food and Politics in Italy (2004); Pizza: A Global History (2008); and Food Culture in the Mediterranean (2009)

Rafael Ioris

Rafael Ioris, PhD

Assistant Professor, History
Sturm Hall, Room 367
2000 E. Asbury Ave.
Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2950
Email: rafael.ioris@du.edu

More..

Focus: Latin America, comparative development, cultural and intellectual history

Background: PhD Emory University, 2009

My work is primarily centered on the political and cultural debates involved in the promotion of fast-pace state-led programs of development in Brazil in the aftermath of World War II.  In a broader perspective, my research speaks to a larger intellectual agenda dealing with the dissemination of industrial projects in late-developing societies, and I am presently focused on investigating the history of developmental ideologies in Latin America vis-a-vis other parts of the emergent world in the second half of the twentieth century.

My research interests are closely tied to my pedagogical philosophy which seeks to answer some of the big questions involved in the broad patterns of development undergone by late-coming societies.  My teaching experiences span into different fields and settings and I have taught both in Brazil and the United States.  The list of courses I am currently teaching includes colonial and modern Latin American survey history courses, an introduction to Latin American Studies through movies, and a comparative history of Latin American development.



Lopezheadshot

Juan Lopez, PhD

Assistant Professor, Economics
Sturm Hall, Room 246
2000 E. Asbury Ave.
Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2685
Fax: 303-871-2605
Email: juancarlos.lopez@du.edu

More..

PhD, Economics, University of California, Riverside

Focus: My primary research fields are in urban and spatial economics, public finance and the economics of water provision. My most recent research has dealt with the implications of interbasin water transfers on household location patterns with a particular emphasis on the American West. In addition, for the last three years I have been involved in the WaterSENSE IGERT program, which aims to develop a coherent interdisciplinary approach to water resource management and policy by integrating researchers from both the natural and social sciences. A second research focus is on the endogenous location of cultural development i.e. where do artists choose to live and work.



William Anderson

Lisa M. Martinez, PhD

Associate Professor, Sociology and Faculty Affiliate of the Latina/o Center at the University of Denver
Sturm Hall Room 442
2000 E. Asbury Ave.
Phone: 303-871-2994
Email: Lisa.Martinez@du.edu

More..

PhD, Sociology, University of Arizona

Research Interests include Latina/o sociology, political sociology, race/ethnic and gender inequality, immigration and minority health. She is currently engaged in research examining the individual-and state-level determinants of Latino/a political participation and is launching a new project on the role of organizations in mobilization and political action in minority communities. She teaches classes in social inequality, Latina/os in American society, sociology of gender, race and ethnic relations, political sociology and research methods.

William Anderson

Dean Saitta, PhD

Professor, Department of Anthropology
Sturm Hall, S105
2000 E. Asbury Ave.
Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2680
Email: dsaitta@du.edu

More..

PhD, Anthropology, University of Massachusetts 
MA, Anthropology, University of Massachusetts 
BA, Anthropology, Wake Forest University

Dean Saitta is Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Director of the Urban Studies program. He has taught at DU since 1988, offering courses in urban anthropology, archaeology, and evolutionary anthropology. He is co-author of Denver: An Archaeological History (University of Pennsylvania Press, 2001), a book which examines the "deep history" of the Denver region from prehistoric times up to the late 19th century.  He blogs at Intercultural Urbanism (his personal blog) and Planetizen, a public interest urban planning website.  Within the Urban Studies minor he teaches "Culture and the City," a comparative study of contemporary urban form and the political, economic, and cultural factors that shape it. He also teaches "The Ancient City", an analysis of urban planning in the great original cradles of civilization, including ancient Mesopotamia, India, Africa, and Central and South America. His portfolio of research, teaching, and public scholarship is available at http://portfolio.du.edu/dsaitta.

William Anderson

Paul Sutton, PhD

Professor, Department of Geography
Boettcher Center West, Room 116
2050 E. Iliff Ave
Denver, CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2767
Email: psutton@du.edu

More..

PhD, University of California, Santa Barbara

Dr. Sutton's interest in urban areas is from a global perspective of sustainability. Much of his research focuses on the use of nighttime satellite imagery to estimate the urban populations and the ecological footprint of the nations of the world. His course THe Human Population is a primer on basic demography with a geographic perspective.

Roberta Waldbaum

Roberta Waldbaum

Teaching Professor of Italian and the Anna Maglione-Sie Endowed Professor in Italian Culture
Department of Languages and Literatures
Sturm Hall, Room 331
2000 E. Asbury Ave
Denver CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-2186
Email: roberta.waldbaum@du.edu

More..

Roberta Waldbaum is a Teaching Professor of Italian and the Anna Maglione-Sie Endowed Professor in Italian Culture in the Department of Languages and Literatures at the University of Denver (DU) where she teaches Italian language, literature, film and culture in the Italian Program and general education courses. The recipient of two teaching awards at DU, her research, publications, conference papers and presentations are in the areas of Italian cinema, literature and culture; language competencies and study abroad; late 19th century Italian education; and international service learning and civic engagement. Her most recent publication is a book chapter, "Keeys to the City: Opening the Gates to Italian Culture Through Literature and Film" in Fostering Culture Through Film, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, May 2016. Dr. Waldbaum teaches courses on the city of Rome in literature and film and Italy through Cinema: Screening the Italian City in which students travel virtually throughout Italy in search of the qualities that make up the good city and the good citizen. She co-founded and served as co-director from 2001-2010 of the International Center for Civic Engagement in Bologna, Italy where she was faculty director-in-residence.

 

William Anderson

Kate Willink, PhD

Associate Professor, Department of Communication Studies
Sturm Hall, 295
2000 E. Asbury Ave
Denver CO 80208
Phone: 303-871-4970
Email: kate.willink@du.edu

More..

Dr. Willink's work centers on critical intercultural communication with a focus on cultural memory in particular how performances of cultural memory shape contemporary debates over public education. As a communication scholar, she researches this lived history of education policy as it illuminates a deeper relationship between pedagogy and cultural politics and shapes contemporary cultural debates about public education. Her book, Bringing Desegregation Home (Palgrave MacMillan, 2009), addresses the extent to which the everyday experiences of desegregation are entangled with broad scholarly concerns such as pedagogy, social and cultural capital, the economy, cultural memory, and racism. The book argues for a deeper understanding of how everyday memory performance works as a form of public pedagogy, shaping contemporary understandings of racial inequality and interracial communities, and inspiring or subverting ongoing attempts to bring about social change. She is currently working on a multiyear fieldwork project that explores race, education, and equity in the Southwest United States. Her publications include articles in Text and Performance Studies, Cultural Studies Critical Methodologies, Qualitative Inquiry, and Communication and Critical/Cultural Studies. Dr. Willink completed her B.A. at Cornell University, her M. A. at the University of New Mexico and her Ph.D. at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.