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Diversity Summit on Inclusive Excellence

Workshops

Full details on the 2016 Summit workshops are below, and will be included in the e-program and on posters/signs on site.

We also have a PDF Schedule Summary Grid .

FYI: Due to large registration numbers, we have repeated several sessions. These "extra" options are listed below, and will be posted on signs/posters and announced at the Summit.

Presenters: We have emailed all lead presenters with room, parking, AV, and other details.

We are no longer accepting new workshop proposals this year. Please consider whether your workshop idea might be appropriate for the DU Women's Conference(4/1), Sexual Assault Awareness Summit (4/8), Internationalization Summit (4/15) or future Diversity Summits.

MORNING workshops: 10.15-11.30am

Click on each title for a session description.

%^!*&!! People Say to People Who Have Disabilities

This session will explore how the best of intentions in interactions with people who have disabilities/ medical conditions can backfire, possibly resulting in lost opportunities for real connections and meaningful work. Participants will begin with feeling very uncomfortable exploring their thoughts, words and actions; then they will feel relief and a sense of confidence knowing that they aren't alone in their discomfort and that there are easy-to-use ways for appropriate conversations and actions.

STURM 233

Administrators' Roundtable (by invitation only)

By invitation only. DU Senior Administrators will spend time with Dr Damon Williams as he shares strategies on transforming institutions of higher education into more inclusive campuses through leadership.

SNYDER BOARDROOM (DCB 6th floor)

ART: Disruptive Reflections of Bias and Oppression

Addressing our biases requires us to lean into our vulnerabilities, which is understandably an uncomfortable and even disturbing process. However, if we are unable to gain the reflective skills necessary to address our implicit biases, the most well-intended of us might impact a great deal of harm onto others and perpetuate a culture of both individualized prejudice as well as systemic oppression. Thus, the aim of this workshop is to discuss the kaleidoscopic facets of society where oppression occurs, how our biases are often born out of and perpetuate these systems of oppression, and how we can harness our creativity in order to use art as a means of addressing these biases and catalyzing metamorphosis in our society. Participants will engage in meaningful discussions around these topics and work in groups to innovate various forms of art—poetry, mural, performance piece, etc—that transforms their intentions into social action. DOUBLE-LENGTH SESSION

STURM 491

Change from Within: Becoming Aware of Our Internal Biases

Confronting our own and others’ biases in order to enact change is a noble goal - but where do we start? This workshop aims to help participants become aware of their own internal biases and consider how to change them. We will present research findings from social and cognitive psychology to help normalize the experience of coming to terms with our biases. Next, participants will each privately take the Implicit Association Test (IAT), a research tool that will help participants identify their own unconscious biases. Finally, as a group, we will discuss strategies for combating our internal biases, supplementing this discussion with evidence from research studies that have attempted to change implicit bias in a variety of ways. This workshop aims to increase awareness of our internal biases, improve our level of comfort about confronting these biases, and empower ourselves to enact change in our own lives.

STURM 353

Dr Eddie Moore, Jr, student discussion (by invitation only)

By invitation only. During this session, Dr Moore will spend time with student leaders to discuss the challenges, responsibilities and blessings associated with leadership on a predominately white institution.

STURM 287

Examining Biases: Reflections from a Community-Engaged Research Project

The session will examine the biases that occur in community-engaged research where work and knowledge are being co-constructed with underrepresented and marginalized populations and in communities of color. The workshop will explore how the presence of research expectations, values, cultural biases, learned behaviors and beliefs, preconceived notions, and stereotypes may influence forging authentic community-partnering experiences. This workshop illustrates the use of critical reflective processes to promote awareness and more informed understanding of encountered biases during engagement with refugee women from the Democratic Republic of Congo. The sharing of Lessons Learned during the research project will allow participants to use the Constructivist Dyad to consider self-reflection and reflective processes for building community partnerships that involve role flexibility and recognition and valuing of cultural differences. The session will also explore how workshop participants have addressed biases in their own cross-cultural work and/or research.

STURM 492

From Fragility and Shame to Resiliency and Accountability: On Whiteness and Wholeness in Racial Justice Work

Research and practice have shown that when white people are confronted about whiteness, privilege, and racism, they often respond with anger, defensiveness, silence, and/or withdrawal. The #BlackLivesMatter movement and increased public dialogue about privilege and systemic racism continue to highlight the need for white people, individually and collectively, to further develop perspectives and skills that support them to be active initiators of change for racial justice. This interactive workshop is being facilitated by white people, for white people. Through group dialogue and personal exploration, participants will begin to 1) understand the definitions of privilege, shame, white fragility, resiliency, and accountability; 2) identify personal reactions to shame; and 3) envision how to show up in allyship with accountability.

STURM 335

I'm Not Racist, but...: Exploring the implicit bias on DU's campus

Do you know where your campus really thinks about diversity, equity, and Inclusive Excellence? This workshop is design to engage participants in an exploration of the campus climate regarding issues of inequity in higher education. This is an opportunity for those interested in understanding the roots of implicit bias by sorting through anonymous responses to key words, phrases, and concept related to diversity. These responses will be collected during the week prior to the Diversity Summit in different locations around campus and include the thoughts of our students, faculty, and staff. Through this experience, participants will engage in a collaborative effort to address findings, implications, and solutions relevant to the theme of the Summit. How does racism permeate our spaces of work? What does that look like in a time of social discord and a growing distaste for political correctness?

STURM 490

Leveraging Identity and Critical Reflection to Increase Community Impact

Critically reflecting on one’s identity is essential to effective community work and helps us to understand our actions. From the guidance of current DU Service & Change (DUSC) student organization leaders, participants will learn specific tools and strategies for critical reflection that will strengthen their ability to make an impact on campus and in the community. This workshop will focus on the community organizing concept of self-interest, provide participants with the resources needed to facilitate critical reflection activities, and the development of individual action plans that integrate identity, reflection, and community change.

STURM 410

Sharing Empowerment through Narrative

Do you ever feel the focus is all on the negative? Or that the “bigger issues” feel too big and complicated? Ever feel the desire to share and connect with your community? If so, you’re in the right place! This workshop focuses on diversity by honoring the individual story. We invite everyone from all backgrounds (and writing levels) to be courageous and share the stories of defining moments, positive and negative, that played a role in your recognition of a diverse outlook. We understand that everyone has a unique lens, through which they experience the world, one that is equally as important to the entire picture. By attending this workshop, you will feel empowered by others stories as they highlight their own diversity and also gain the confidence and support that comes with sharing your own.

STURM 412

Turning Good Intentions into Good Teaching: Common Principles for Inclusive Pedagogy

Many well-intentioned instructors and university professionals do not have formal backgrounds in the literature about learning science, universal design, culturally relevant pedagogy, or globally/culturally inclusive pedagogy. These theories can seem overwhelming and feel like yet one more aspect to understand and master. However, many of these learning theories have common principles that in the end support all learners. In this interactive session we will pull together and share a few of the principles that are common to each of these different areas of literature. Participants will leave with a better understanding of what is considered best practice for different learners, and at the same time is simply good teaching practice for everyone.

STURM 435

What Should I know about Islam?

Whether you get your news through TV, the radio, on-line or social media you have been exposed to reports and stories about Islam, Muslim extremists, and xenophobic political rhetoric. But what do you know about the tenets of Islam, its history and Muslims around the world? This session will include an introduction to Islam and the Islamic word and a panel discussion with Muslim members of the DU and Denver-area community. Participants are encouraged to also attend the all-afternoon session on practical ways to address Islamophobia.

STURM 134

White Bodies and Racial Justice Work: Understanding Ally Identities in the Black Lives Matter Movement

This session explores the role of allies, intersectional identities, and racial activism. Looking at the Black Lives Matter movement, we will discuss the process of identifying communities to engage with and finding place and belonging in those communities. We will be having blatant, honest discussions about race, whiteness, privilege, and social identities. This session will provide tools to be a "good ally" through: understanding your own positionality, knowing its impact on behavior and thought, and being aware of your space in racial justice development.

STURM 234

**SPECIAL TIME & LOCATION:** 10am-12noon: The United States, Extremism and Muslims: panel

Featuring Joanne Cummings, career foreign service officer of the US Department of State, and DU faculty members Nader Hashemi (Korbel School), Seth Masket (Political Science) and Andrea Stanton (Religious Studies). Part of the two-day Extremism and Islamophobia in Perspective series, offered in conjunction with the Summit, by the DU Department of Religious Studies, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies and various other departments/institutions on campus for a thoughtful address, panel and workshop about Islamophobia and extremism.

ANDERSON ACADEMIC COMMONS 290

1st Afternoon workshops: 1.45-3.00pm

Click on each title for a session description.

ART: Disruptive Reflections of Bias and Oppression (continued)

This double-length session continues for those who attended first-half during the morning session.

STURM 491

Beyond Good Intentions

Focusing on the higher education learning environment, this session bridges the gap from thought to action and illuminates the global relevance of critical and inclusive pedagogies (CIP) by demonstrating how its application can transform the teaching and learning process and promote more equitable educational outcomes among all students. Session participants will be introduce CIP to explore how these pedagogies not only promote deep learning and cultural competence among students, but also better equip instructors to attend to the needs of diverse students by prioritizing their intellectual and social development; creating identity affirming learning environments that foster high expectations; recognizing the value of the cultural and national differences that learners bring to the educational experience; and engaging the “whole” student in the teaching and learning process.

STURM 254

Curing Health of Unconscious Biases: The intersection of race, gender, class, and health outcomes

According to the World Health Organization’s Commission on the Social Determinants of Health, “the social conditions in which people are born, live and work are the single most important determinants of good health or ill health, of a long and productive life, or a short and miserable one.” This session will introduce participants to health as a social justice issue by dissecting how systemic inequalities with regards to race, gender, and class can create and perpetuate health disparities. Through the exploration of campus and community case studies, participants will examine how the utilization of a harm reduction approach can offer a framework for meeting individuals “where they are at” in order to address health behaviors and disparities in an unbiased manner.

STURM 410

Disability and the Real World, an Inside perspective: What Haven't You thought of?

This program is an interactive and collaborative experience designed to provide participants with exposure to the discussion surrounding what it means to live life as a person who identifies as having a physical disability in today’s society. Often times, disability is glossed over or not thought of as relevant above and beyond accommodation and compliance. The reason for this may be lack of understanding on the part of the individual; certain biases or prejudices, or just a lack of the acknowledgment that disabled people are complex beings above and beyond their basic physical modification requirements. Through utilizing this program, the hope is to begin a productive well informed dialogue which will allow the participants to have an open and honest conversation around disability, and thus, enable them to serve their community in a more holistic manner.

STURM 233

Dr Eddie Moore, Jr: White Privilege 101: Getting in on the Conversations

This interactive, informational, challenging and energetic session examines and explores white privilege/oppression and the imperative that those promoting diversity must “get in on the conversations.” Participants will leave with the skills and knowledge necessary to begin addressing issues of white privilege/oppression individually, in their classroom and in their institutions.

STURM 187

Including Speakers of Other Languages

Discover what it means to be culturally competent and how to promote inclusion. Learn workable ways to include speakers of other languages and cultures where multicultural workplaces and classrooms are the norm. Learn various verbal and nonverbal methods of inclusivity. What is in-group membership? How does it affect communication, conversation, and interaction in the work and school environment? Become more cognizant of your attitudes and behavior at work or school. The focus of this session is identifying 1) your motivations and behaviors in interactions, 2) developing a plan for change, and 3) strategies to increase inclusivity of speakers of other languages.

STURM 480

Inclusive Excellence as a Spirit of Compassion in achieving equity education and access

In light of recent events occurring at the University of Missouri and other Universities across the US, many questions arise. This workshop will look at the racial, gender, and class inequities in education through a Problem-Based learning model, and will ask participants to work collaboratively with fellow participants in constructing and identifying ways to achieve inclusive excellence as a spirit of compassion in achieving equity education and access.

STURM 492

Innovative Community Organizing Strategies to Develop Inclusive, Socially Just Communities

DU’s Center for Community Engagement and Service Learning (CCESL) believes community organizing is a more effective strategy than activism because rather than bringing people together around issues, community organizing brings diverse people together to achieve social change based on their shared values. Participants will gain an understanding of Community Organizing principles, such as how to work with others to take collective public action, and how they may be strategically used to address social inequalities. The rich traditions of Community Organizing have been applied to develop creative solutions in diverse communities for decades. Learn innovative strategies to take advantage of these skills in order to create and support inclusive communities here in Denver. We will also discuss current civic engagement initiatives through CCESL that can build skills and provide opportunities to take action to address community needs.

STURM 435

Performing Reflexivity in Learning Environments

This session introduces reflexivity as a best practice to building Inclusive Excellence. We define reflexivity as a practice of heightened self-awareness of one’s privileges and communication, a way of making oneself vulnerable to critique in encounters with others. We introduce performance as fostering Inclusive Excellence, particularly in environments characterized by climates of defensiveness or suspicion (e.g., predominantly white institutions). Performance theory and practice (in fields like Theater, Education, Communication), invites practitioners to “rehearse for the revolution” by permitting a range of possibilities, not constrained by the realist dictum of “this is the way things must be.” Through performance, communicators may play with their power, revising old “scripts” (e.g., a teacher “letting things slide” to promote civility, or a student criticizing multiculturalism as “reverse racism”). We invite participants to practice reflexivity through a small group performance, and discuss how reflexive communication can (and cannot) promote greater agency, accountability, and inclusive relationships.

STURM 412

Supporting Inclusive Practices for International and ELL Students in our Residence Halls, and beyond

Traditionally, international and ELL (English Language Learner) students have been under-supported in residence hall settings. Through our experiences with Housing and Residential Education at DU, we have seen many of these students treated unfairly or disregarded due to cultural boundaries and barriers, especially those that speak English as a second language. This is mainly due to lack of education for housing professionals and other residents regarding this issue. During our session, we will talk about research and best practices regarding working and connecting with these students in various housing settings (programming, conduct, etc.), and beyond, in order to allow them to reach their potential as Pioneers. We will also have time for discussion about this topic, so feel free to bring your own stories and advice about working with international and ELL students!

STURM 490

White Bodies and Racial Justice Work: Understanding Ally Identities in the Black Lives Matter Movement

This session explores the role of allies, intersectional identities, and racial activism. Looking at the Black Lives Matter movement, we will discuss the process of identifying communities to engage with and finding place and belonging in those communities. We will be having blatant, honest discussions about race, whiteness, privilege, and social identities. This session will provide tools to be a "good ally" through: understanding your own positionality, knowing its impact on behavior and thought, and being aware of your space in racial justice development.

STURM 275

**SPECIAL TIME & LOCATION:** 1:30-3:30pm: Addressing Islamophobia: action workshop

Catherine Orsborn (facilitator), with Nabil Echchaibi (CU Boulder), Tay Minshall (Muslim Law Students Association), and others.  Part of the two-day Extremism and Islamophobia in Perspective series, offered in conjunction with the Summit, by the DU Department of Religious Studies, the Center for Middle Eastern Studies and various other departments/institutions on campus for a thoughtful address, panel and workshop about Islamophobia and extremism.

ANDERSON ACADEMIC COMMONS 290

2nd Afternoon workshops: 3.15-4.30pm

Click on each title for a session description.

Art as a Narrative and the Responsibility of the Audience

This workshop will provide participants with an opportunity to interact with a variety of art and forms of expression. The facilitators will provide tools for interpreting the art and using it as a catalyst for conversation as it relates to identity, culture, and social justice. Participants will also engage in dialogue that challenges ones world view. At the end of the workshop, these participants will develop a responsibility in recognizing art as a method of communication for stepping in someone else's shoes and will be challenged to use this critical lens in documenting our community.

STURM 491

Communicating with Non-Neurotypical Students, Staff and Faculty in the Context of Higher Education

This session explores the concept of non-neurotypicality, particularly as it impacts students, staff and faculty in the context of higher education. After defining non-neurotypicality, presenters Joshua Hanan and Shaundi Newbolt will each share how non-neurotypicality affects them and how they are currently addressing non-neurotypicality in their research and teaching. Hanan will pay particular attention to Attention Deficit Disorder and its prominence in the 21st century. He will also focus on the struggles of being a professor with ADD. Newbolt will pay particular attention to the complexities of neurodiversity as it relates to autism, Asperger’s, AD(H)D, dyslexia, dyspraxia, and generalized anxiety. As a self-advocate, she will share some of her struggles as a graduate student. Both presenters will make recommendations about how to effectively communicate with people with non-neurotypical needs by sharing best practices for fostering inclusivity in interpersonal and classroom interactions.

STURM 275 (note room change!)

Confronting Faith-based Bias: Examining Religion the Media

This workshop will explore portrayals of various faiths in the media and how this creates a need, more than ever, for interfaith cooperation today. Participants will have the opportunity to discuss their personal perspectives in small and large groups and understand how their personal identities affect their positionality in relation to this topic. Discussions will be facilitated by group leaders and guiding questions will be provided. Materials for consideration, such as an article and a video clip, will also be provided. The need for interfaith dialogue and interaction to solve real-world problems will be emphasized.

STURM 287

Disability and the Real World, an Inside perspective: What Haven't You thought of?

This program is an interactive and collaborative experience designed to provide participants with exposure to the discussion surrounding what it means to live life as a person who identifies as having a physical disability in today’s society. Often times, disability is glossed over or not thought of as relevant above and beyond accommodation and compliance. The reason for this may be lack of understanding on the part of the individual; certain biases or prejudices, or just a lack of the acknowledgment that disabled people are complex beings above and beyond their basic physical modification requirements. Through utilizing this program, the hope is to begin a productive well informed dialogue which will allow the participants to have an open and honest conversation around disability, and thus, enable them to serve their community in a more holistic manner.

STURM 233

From Fragility and Shame to Resiliency and Accountability: On Whiteness and Wholeness in Racial Justice Work

Research and practice have shown that when white people are confronted about whiteness, privilege, and racism, they often respond with anger, defensiveness, silence, and/or withdrawal. The #BlackLivesMatter movement and increased public dialogue about privilege and systemic racism continue to highlight the need for white people, individually and collectively, to further develop perspectives and skills that support them to be active initiators of change for racial justice. This interactive workshop is being facilitated by white people, for white people. Through group dialogue and personal exploration, participants will begin to 1) understand the definitions of privilege, shame, white fragility, resiliency, and accountability; 2) identify personal reactions to shame; and 3) envision how to show up in allyship with accountability.

STURM 187

"I look at the media and whom do I see?" Exploring issues of power and privilege in media

This workshop focuses on issues of power & privilege in news, and how these reflect and reinforce power dynamics in society that give preferential treatment to dominant (privileged) groups, and ignores, distorts or stereotypes many marginalized groups.

STURM 186

Including Speakers of Other Languages

Discover what it means to be culturally competent and how to promote inclusion. Learn workable ways to include speakers of other languages and cultures where multicultural workplaces and classrooms are the norm. Learn various verbal and nonverbal methods of inclusivity. What is in-group membership? How does it affect communication, conversation, and interaction in the work and school environment? Become more cognizant of your attitudes and behavior at work or school. The focus of this session is identifying 1) your motivations and behaviors in interactions, 2) developing a plan for change, and 3) strategies to increase inclusivity of speakers of other languages.

STURM 480 (note room change!)

Making #BlackLivesMatter in Historically White Institutions

The #BlackLivesMatter movement – started by three Black women Alicia Garza, Patrisse Cullors, and Opal Tometi – aims to center and affirm the ways that Black people engage resilience and meaningfully contribute to society, even as policies and practices in the U.S. “systematically and intentionally [target them] for demise” (Garza, 2014, p.1). The rallying cry for All Black Lives to Matter has not been regulated to the streets of major urban cities. On college campuses across the US racially minoritized faculty, staff, and students (and their allies) at our nation’s finest HWIs including but not limited to University of Texas Austin, University of Missouri, Duke University, Yale University and the University of Michigan have been speaking out in resistance to their daily encounters with racism. In this session, the participants will engage in a facilitated dialogue on the implications of the #BlackLivesMatter Movement and the search for racially inclusive campus environments.

STURM 254

Many Voices, Many Actions

While at DU, have you ever felt excluded? While at DU, have you ever excluded someone? If you answered yes to either of these questions, then this workshop is for you. Many Voices, Many Actions provides a safe and friendly space for participants to reflect on their experience while at DU - the good, the bad, and the ugly. During the workshop, we will challenge ourselves to try to unpack the reasons as to why we have been excluded or why we have excluded someone else. We will brainstorm as a group to find ways to move towards a more inclusive campus.

STURM 435

Power, Privilege and Oppression: Understanding White Cultural Capital

Participants will be taking part in learning about the various aspects of marginalization, white privilege and various ways oppression is manifested. Participants can expect to gain insight on the subtleties of systemic racism and various micro-aggressions that people (students) of color deal with on a daily basis not just on predominantly white campuses (PWC’s), but all throughout the community. This workshop is designed to enlighten (not accuse) and will be conducted in a most sensitive manner. Participants will leave with a greater understanding of not only the privileges that the dominant culture is afforded, but how to take those privileges and use them to become allies of the marginalized.

STURM 410

The Rewards and Challenges of Working in a Diverse Learning Community

Our backgrounds and identities influence how we see the world and communicate with others. Unfortunately, we don't often realize just how much our background biases our perceptions of others, which can lead to a variety of unintentional miscommunications. To complicate matters, we also work with young adults that define themselves very differently than prior generations. This interactive workshop is an introduction to human development and diversity concepts that will allow you to reflect on your own background, challenge you to think about your own identities and prejudices, and consider how they influence the way you negotiate a diverse working environment in the 21st century.

STURM 134

Understanding Labels: Do I fit in that box? Do you?

Student. Professor. Native. Immigrant. Graduate. Dropout. Labels help us understand the people around us. We may think we understand what it means to be a dropout, bilingual or a Latina, but do we really? This interactive session provides opportunities for participants to examine their own assumptions about labels through participatory activities and opportunities for reflection. Understanding how and why we use labels is a foundational step towards confronting our own personal biases.

STURM 412