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Diversity Summit on Inclusive Excellence

Workshops

Below, you'll find basic information on the Friday breakout workshop sessions for this year's Summit.

We are providing this initial workshop information to help participants indicate interest in specific sessions as part of their registration. The actual schedule of workshops will be published closer to the Summit day.

The abstracts are grouped by the expected prior experience level of participants (Introductory | Intermediate | Advanced), and tagged with the intended audience (by University affiliation) and up to three descriptive focus areas:

  • #Best/promising practices: Developing and/or sharing useful how-to's that participants can apply in their own settings.
  • #Creative: Sharing the process, presentation and impact of performing, studio, digital and other creative activities.
  • #Leadership/management: Motivating and empowering others around inclusiveness.
  • #Research: Sharing findings and implications from research projects.
  • #Specific population(s): Experiences of and issues facing specific segments of the campus community.
  • #Teaching & curriculum: Designing content and leading learning.

Please CLICK on each title below to expand details for each confirmed workshop.

Please contact diversitysummit@du.edu with questions.

Introductory Level

AMERICAN HORROR STORY: TOKENISM IN MEDIA

Film, television, and magazines share stories about the U.S. society that may not always reflect its reality. It's a real Scandal! Media can validate, reaffirm, and give voice to a community, culture, and individuals. Media can also invalidate, misrepresent, and silence a community, culture, and individuals. In this workshop, we will look back at the trends of storytelling and tokenism of identities and cultures in media and discuss how it has influenced our perceptions of community, culture, and individuals. It's a Titanic of an issue!

#Leadership/management #Teaching & curriculum

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Staff, Community Members

BRINGING THE CAMPUS TOGETHER: INTERCULTURAL PROGRAMMING AT DU

DU's internationalization efforts are incredible assets and tools for developing students into global leaders. Among these efforts are a growing international population (11%) and more opportunities for study abroad. But challenges remain on our campus in terms of engagement between international students and domestic students, faculty and staff. There is still room for improvement to create an inclusive environment at DU where the international and domestic communities are connected and integrated. This session will share the efforts of four departments -- Daniels College of Business, Housing & Residential Education, International Student & Scholar Services, and Student Activities -- to develop pathways for deeper engagement and intercultural competence. Examples of programs and services will be presented briefly, and then presenters will use case studies and participant input to lead a discussion on further ways to develop an inclusive campus community for international and domestic students, faculty and staff.

#Best/promising practices  #Leadership/management  #Specific population(s)

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Staff, Faculty

HOW TO BE AN ALLY: TOOLS, SKILLS, AND DISCUSSION

This workshop will explore how we can function as effective allies within our social and professional communities. Together with participants, we will describe what an ally is, why allies are important, and specific strategies that allies can use to be supportive and effective. We will share strategies for discerning when certain action strategies are likely to yield positive results. For example, there are some situations in which private conversations are likely to yield more effective results than public confrontations, and vice versa. We will focus on how to assess problematic situations to determine how we can help to maximize awareness and growth. We will also address common feelings that allies experience, such as insufficiency, guilt, and exhaustion. We will explore questions including "Am I a 'bad ally' if I do not confront every inappropriate comment or action I witness?" and "How can I restore and maintain emotional strength when ally efforts become exhausting?" Participants will be provided with booklets containing relevant materials and resources for continued support.

#Best/promising practices  #Leadership/management

Audience: all

iDU: TOOLS AND TECHNIQUES FOR INCLUSIVE COURSE DESIGN IN THE DIGITAL AGE

This session integrates the needs of DU learners with inclusive strategies, addressing the varied student abilities found in classroom and online learning environments. We will discuss potential barriers to learning, identify tools and techniques to minimize these barriers, and familiarize attendees with campus and online resources through the sharing of experiences, live demonstration, and group activities. Specific topics will include effectively utilizing a Learning Management System (e.g. Blackboard/Canvas) to present and facilitate courses in an accessible manner, and identifying inclusive considerations for multimedia use (e.g. videos, online documents). The goal of this session is to increase awareness about potential access barriers to instructional material and provide tools and techniques to support the inclusion of diverse learners.

#Best/promising practices  #Specific populations  #Teaching & curriculum

Audience: Staff, Faculty

LET'S TALK ABOUT SEX: DE-STIGMATIZING CONVERSATIONS ABOUT SEX TO ENCOURAGE BETTER RESEARCH, TEACHING, AND CLINICAL PRACTICE

Social norms regarding discussing sexuality limit our abilities to consider and openly address the range of human sexual behaviors. This workshop will create a space to encourage discussion of all aspects of sexual behaviors. We will address sexual stigma affecting specific communities, identities, and age groups. We will review the negative effects of stigma, as well as the positive effects of open discussion about sex. Participants will take part in a discussion about the intersection between sexual violence and stigma, including the psychological effects regarding sexual assault, legal implications such as reporting assault, and sexual violence on college campuses. We will suggest strategies for challenging stigma in order to discuss sex in a positive and comprehensive way. Participants will have an opportunity to talk about creating healthy sexual discussions in their work and home environments.

#Best/promising practices  #Leadership/management  #Specific population(s)

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Faculty, Community members

PACIFIC ISLANDERS IN THE UNITED STATES NAVIGATING EDUCATION

When most Americans think of the Pacific Islands, sandy beaches, palm trees, and elements of luxury come to mind. Yet beneath that popular perception lies a completely different reality and community: the Pacific Islands as a home of indigenous people, sharing complex political ties to the United States. According to the 2010 Census there are over 1.2 million Pacific Islanders in the U.S., and is one of the fastest-growing ethnic groups in the country. What do we really know about Pacific Islanders? Why are Pacific Islanders choosing to leave their homelands and come to the continental U.S.? This workshop seeks to answer these questions.

#Specific Population(s)

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Community Members

Phitnus: A Journey of Entrepreneurialism, Community Impact and Healing

We will discuss the art of including one’s passion and purpose with the skills that you already possess to turn your dream into a viable business. Phitnus creator, Phoenix Jackson will share her journey thru higher education, entrepreneurialism, and her work in creating a culturally relevant wellness program for women. Participants will observe the marketing around Phitnus, get a sample of the workout, what’s to come within our advocacy for wellness in our communities, and do a fun activity to explore their “Lifestyle PhlyStyle.” (1st 10 attendees receive a copy of the Phitnus DVD!)

#Specific Population(s) #Creative #Best/Promising Practice

Audience: all

REAL LIFE INDIANS

"Do you still live in a Tipi?" is a question Native Americans are still asked today. From the comic, White-starring Tonto in Disney's 2013 Lone Ranger, partially shot in Colorado, to campus dismissals of concerns with the retired Boone figure, mass and social media sadly continue portraying false, outdated and damaging images of Native American people; society has forgotten that we are real people. In this interactive session, we'll deconstruct these stereotypes and analyze media images in context of the struggles Native American populations face today (e.g., high levels of poverty, high rates of domestic violence against Native American women, and low success in education), learn about Native American people as Real Life Indians, and explore how to become a good ally.

#Best/Promising Practices  #Creative  #Specific Population(s)

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Faculty

Revisiting the 2012 DU Campus Climate Assessment (DOUBLE SESSION)

In the early 2012, University of Denver administered a campus climate assessment to students, faculty, and staff, garnering responses from 3,747 participants (a 26.2% response rate). Over the course of the following year both qualitative and quantitative analyses were completed, providing an understanding of the climate realities at DU. University representatives and outside assessment consultants will discuss the context of the survey, including the process of construction and implementation. The consultants will discuss the quantitative and qualitative analyses and findings of the assessment, illustrating the purpose and utilization of campus climate research with the hope of creating more welcoming and affirming campus environments. The presentation will continue with a time of dialogue, as associate provost Tuitt highlights the questions, struggles, and concerns present during the study, and engages participants in considering how climate studies can further the work of diversity and inclusion in hostile campus environments. We will conclude with responses to and/or initial implications underway, stemming from the assessment.

#Best/Promising Practices  #Research  #Leadership/Mgt

Audience: All

THE DRUG WAR IN OUR BACKYARD: HISTORICAL, NATIONAL, AND EDUCATIONAL PERSPECTIVES

The legalization of marijuana is currently a widely discussed topic, but one largely ignored factor is its impact on higher education. We will address this issue by first providing a historical background of drug laws and how they relate to racial and economic disparities. Then, we will discuss how these laws and policies continue to perpetuate social and economic inequality currently. Our main emphasis will be on the way that these issues relate to access to and discrimination within higher education. From this viewpoint, we will open up discussion on the future direction of drug laws and policies, and specifically, how these recent changes in marijuana legislation in Colorado affect policies and practices at universities.

#Leadership/management

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Administrators, Community members

"WHAT KIND OF ASIAN ARE YOU?" STEREOTYPES AND MICROAGRESSIONS IN THE EXPERIENCES OF ASIAN AMERICAN PACIFIC ISLANDER COLLEGE STUDENTS

"What kind of Asian are you?" This is one example of many microaggressions committed against Asian American Pacific Islander (AAPI) students both inside and outside of the classroom. The model minority myth is a pervasive stereotype that considers all AAPI students to be academically successful and well-adjusted. However, this is far from the reality and lived experiences of many AAPI students. We will explore the diversity of ethnicities and experiences in this group, as well as address the serious inequities that impact each individual's experience using the concepts of intersectionality. As a group we will work together to recognize and address racial microagressions committed against members of the AAPI group. Participants will gain knowledge and tools to understand AAPI student experiences and to act as allies for these students both within and outside of the classroom.

#Best/promising practices # Specific population(s) #Teaching & curriculum

AUDIENCE: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Staff, Faculty, Administrators, Alumni, Community members

WHERE ARE YOU FROM?: THE CHALLENGES AND ASSETS OF MILITARY AND TRANSIENT STUDENTS IN THE CLASSROOM

While this workshop focuses on the challenges faced by military-connected children, much of what is discussed is applicable to any student of any age who has led a transient lifestyle. Many military-connected children see the challenges of life as insurmountable obstacles while others embrace the opportunities for personal growth and development. As service providers to military-connected children we can help them acclimate to and assimilate in to new environments, offering support and understanding during times of need arising from personal, local or national crisis.

#Research  #Specific population(s)

Audience: All, and Educators, administrators, or other service-providers working with children who have led a transient lifestyle

WHITENESS, WOMANHOOD, AND WORKING AGAINST RACISM: DEVELOPING CURRICULA FOR IDENTITY EXPLORATION AND SOCIAL ACTION PLANNING

Through the lens of my research on White college women, this session will explore means of developing transformative curricula to facilitate identity development and allied behavior development. Participants can expect to engage in learning opportunities exploring their own identities and privileges and will walk away with tangible ideas about how to engage in social justice action within their spheres of influence.

#Teaching & curriculum

Audience: Graduate Students, Staff, Faculty

Intermediate Level

ACCESS TO WHAT AND FOR WHOM?: AFRICAN AMERICAN MALES IN HIGHER EDUCATION

When faced with the declining presence of African American males in higher education, K-12 and higher education institutions should feel pressure to collaboratively develop intervention initiatives that produce a critical mass of African American-Black Males engaging in academics of higher education that mirrors the critical mass of African American-Black males represented on athletic fields. Tedesco (2005) asserts engaging students of color in higher education is all about building and filling the pipeline through college access programs and outreach initiatives. Topic discussions of this workshop will focus on inclusive practices that value and recognize identity development, students’ origin of culture, and the engagement of social networks. Additionally, the workshop will feature discourse around disrupting systemic barriers as it relates to increasing access to higher education for African American male students.

#Best/promising practices  #Research #Specific population(s)

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Staff, Faculty, Administrators, Alumni, Community members

The Be(A)ware Campaign: Building Brave Spaces and Amplifying Student Voice Through Social Media

On October 28, 2013, an extremely hurtful message was written on a mirror within a multicultural floor in a DU first year residence hall. In an effort to combat this issue and bring awareness to our entire Pioneer community, the Be(A)ware campaign utilized social media to highlight the incredible diversity on our campus, while also tackling what campus cultures allow incidents like this to take place. The campaign received over 50 anonymous submissions and coverage from 9News. We believe it is crucial to address this event, in addition to deconstructing the response to the campaign in order to encourage Summit participants to think critically about how we can better work together to recognize the many layers of Inclusive Excellence, challenge our own biases, educate and support one other, and shift culture through social media.

#Best/promising practices #Creative #Leadership/Management

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Faculty, Administrators

ENVISIONING RACIAL INCLUSIVITY IN THE COLLEGE CLASSROOM

How does race impact the college classroom and the teaching and learning experiences therein? In this interactive workshop, we will use activities, storytelling, and scenarios to identify how white privilege and racism impact the collegiate learning environment. We will look specifically at racial micro aggressions and identify what they are and discuss examples. We will conclude the workshop with a brainstorming exercise to identify ways that we as learners and educators can build racial inclusivity in the college classroom.

#Best/promising practices  #Specific population(s)  #Teaching & curriculum

Audience: all

DEVELOPING AN INCLUSIVE EXCELLENCE LEADERSHIP CERTIFICATE PROGRAM

Inclusive Excellence is one of the key components of DU's diversity statement, as well as the university's mission, values, and goals, as the University strives to create a welcoming and inclusive environment, one that values the experiences and worldviews of all individuals and groups. Working together with campus partners, the Center for Multicultural Excellence will soon launch an Inclusive Excellence Leadership Certificate (IELC) to enhance the awareness and everyday practice of Inclusive Excellence for students at DU. The IELC will not only benefit the University by improving the overall campus climate, but also participating students dedicated to increasing their cultural awareness and leadership involvement. This session will examine the DU campus climate, discuss components of Inclusive Excellence, and take an in-depth look at the development of the IELC. With that background, participants will help shape the initiative by discussing interest in and opinions of the program, and suggesting areas for improvement and ideas for implementation.

#Best/promising practices  #Research  #Specific population(s)

Audience: all

How we won ASSET: Brief history of tuition equity policy in Colorado and snapshot of what has happened across the country

In this session, we’ll explore Colorado policy prior to 1997, undocumented students and higher education during this time, changes in the state and the country between 1997 and 2013; a current look across the country – what other states are doing in regards to undocumented and/or DACAmented students and higher education policy; where the FAFSA comes in; and how undocumented students are overcoming the hurdle of still expensive In-state tuition.

#Leadership/management #Research #Specific population(s)

Audience: Graduate Students, Faculty, Staff, Administrators and Community Members

Impact of Microaggressions in Higher Education: From the Employees' Perspective

Although there has been substantial research examining the effects of microaggressions in the public sphere there has been little research that examines microaggressions and their relationship to campus climate. This workshop explains from empirical data the types of microaggressions that affect campus climate for employees at universities. Additionally, the workshop provides an interactive component that allows participants to evaluate their own encounters and participation in acts of microaggressions. The larger aims of the workshop will spark university dialogue and begin the education of a workforce on cultural competence. As a result of these findings, coping strategies are suggested along with implications for professional development training.

#Best/promising practices #Leadership/management

Audience: Graduate Students, Staff, Faculty, Administrators

IN SOLIDARITY: PERFORMING ALLIANCES ACROSS DIFFERENCE IN ACADEMIA

Alliances across difference are an important part of any social justice movement. However, the nuances of privilege and oppression condition these alliances and warrant thoughtful and critical discussions. In this session, two doctoral students facilitate a critical, praxis-based conversation about the challenges and benefits of performing intersectional alliances across difference in academia. Using examples from their own lived experiences and personal alliances across race, gender, sexuality, and other categories of identity, the facilitators survey pertinent interdisciplinary literature about alliance building and critique discussions about alliances in popular culture. They define "ally" as an identity that is performed intersectionally, reflexively, and continually – rather than simply declared. The presenters also address the contentious nature of alliances among members of marginalized communities. Finally, they invite participants to reflect on the ways in which they perform alliances across difference in their daily lives. The workshop ends with a small group activity, which will help participants to brainstorm ways in which they can continue to forge and strengthen alliances across difference.

#Best/promising practices #Leadership/management  #Teaching & curriculum

Audience: All

PROJECT AVA: SHARING MEANINGFUL STORIES THAT INSPIRE MEANINGFUL CHANGE

Why can't a video about healthcare reform be just as popular as a cat video? Why can't a piece on cultural identity be just as compelling as the gossip column? Why can't a campaign on sex trafficking be just as viral as the launch of the next iPhone? They can, and the key is telling meaningful stories. Attendees will learn our unique approach to sharing meaningful stories and how we use them to launch successful social campaigns that raise awareness, raise money,or call people to action. They will learn through interactive participation how social media, community resources, and the Internet can inspire meaningful change. This is Project Ava's 4-Step Action Plan to social campaigning.

#Best/promising practices  #Creative  #Leadership/management

Audience: Undergraduate Students

(RE)VISITING THE NEED FOR INCLUSIVE LEADERSHIP WITHIN STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS: A YEAR LATER

Creating a space for inclusivity within student organizations begins with its leaders. Building off of the experiences of the Graduate Student Government's implementation of inclusive excellence as a main goal of the organization, this workshop will provide guidelines for incorporating inclusive leadership and cultivating the need for inclusivity within the membership of student organizations. Beginning with actively recruiting leadership with similar goals to creating events that uphold the agenda of the organization, this workshop will discuss how to engage inclusivity at all levels of the student group.

#Best/promising practices  #Leadership/management

Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students, Staff, Faculty, Administrators

Advanced Level

HOW INCLUSIVE IS YOUR RESEARCH? CREATIVE REPRESENTATIONS OF QUALITATIVE DATA

Traditional representations of qualitative data often limit researchers’ impact on minoritized communities. Data in the form of art, performance(s), and stories, become points of entry to a phenomenon, culture, or individual truths. Most people use a variety of ways to convey what they know: stories, pictures, theater, demonstrations, and poetry-and that most of these approaches are "as old as the hills" (Eisner, 1997, p. 5). Inclusive Excellence calls for a campus that engages in intentional conversations that are intellectually and culturally responsive. Hence, the orienting question of this session, “How inclusive is your research?” forces us to consider the representation of qualitative data that are relevant to communities we hope to help. Participants will discuss potential implications of using creative representations of data on practice, research, policy, advocacy and change, and participate in an activity applying what we’ve learned.

#Creative #Leadership/management #Research

Audience: Graduate Students, Faculty, Administrators, Community Members