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Facility Waste

 

Facilities Rennovation/Modifications

Residence Halls

Grounds/Vehicles

Power Plant

Waste Storage

 

Facility Renovation/Modifications

Whenever building materials will be disturbed during renovation or modification activities, asbestos and lead hazards should be considered.  Disturbing materials which may cause airborne asbestos fibers or airborne lead dust from lead-based paint is both a personal health issue and an environmental pollution issue. 

The following best management practices are recommended:

Asbestos

  • A comprehensive building asbestos inspection should be performed to identify asbestos materials, locations and condition.  Materials may include insulation, floor tiles, roofing material, valve gaskets and other common building materials.
  • Label all known Asbestos Containing Material (ACM).
  • Perform periodical inspections of ACM to assess changes in condition.  
  • ACM should be abated by State qualified personnel in accordance with state and federal regulations wherever the potential exist that ACM may be disturbed during planned maintenance, repair and modification work.
  • All personnel who may potentially disturb any ACM should have two hour asbestos awareness training.
  • The facility emergency plan should include a scenario for response to an unplanned release of ACM.  The EH&S Manager should be notified immediately of an asbestos fiber release episode. 

Lead

  • Before beginning renovation activities involving painted surfaces, the layers of paint should be sampled and analyzed to determine lead content.  Removal or disruption of significant amounts of lead containing materials may require a written Lead Exposure Plan.  Contact the EH&S Manager for technical support.

Residence Halls

Residence hall waste contain many materials that can be harmful to people and the sanitary sewer system.   Such materials include cleaning detergents and supplies, paints, batteries, chlorine bleach, fire extinguishers, propellants in aerosol cans, lawn care chemicals, and fluorescent bulbs.  Please reference the Hazardous Materials Management policy for guidance on purchasing chemicals, managing chemical waste, and controlling spills. 

Storage of hazardous substances is just as important as their disposal.  It is recommended to always keep hazardous materials in their original containers and never remove the labels.  In addition, household hazardous waste must never be mixed with other products, as incompatible substances may react, ignite, or explode.  Finally, always follow the disposal instructions on the label and take household hazardous waste to a local collection facility, if available. 

The following best management practices should be used:

  • Use and store products containing hazardous substances appropriately.
  • Use household hazardous materials outside or in well-ventilated rooms to avoid breathing in fumes.  Only use the recommended amount of the material, and when possible, buy only the quantity you need.
  • When purchasing products, such as household cleaners, seek out nontoxic alternatives.
  • Purchase non-aerosol products to minimize the release of harmful vapors.
  • Keep products containing hazardous materials in their original containers and never remove the labels.
  • Never mix leftover household hazardous waste with other products.
  • Follow all instructions on product labels for use and disposal.
  • Contact Hazardous Materials Management for any questions regarding disposal.

Cathode Ray Tubes

The proliferation of consumer electronics has led to electronics waste becoming one of the fastest growing waste streams in America.  From an environmental perspective, this is important because most electronic appliances contain hazardous materials, such as lead, mercury, or hexavalent chromium.  Of particular concern is the waste generated by discarded computer monitors which contain cathode ray tubes (CRTs).  CRTs contain large quantities of lead, in some cases up to eight pounds of lead in a single CRT.  This has led EPA recently to propose that CRTs be treated as Universal Waste, which hopefully will increase reuse and recycling of these products.

One of the best management practices for reducing the environmental impact of electronics waste is to buy “greener” electronic products.  Reusing and recycling electronics is another way to reduce waste generation.  When purchasing new electronics, look for models that:

  • Are energy-sufficient (e.g. show the “Energy Star” label).
  • Are designed for easy upgrading or disassembly.
  • Use minimal packaging.
  • Offer leasing or “take back” options.
  • Have been recognized by independent certification groups as environmentally preferable.
  • Are made with fewer toxic constituents.
  • Use recycled content.

Fluorescent Bulbs

Fluorescent bulbs consume only one quarter of the electricity consumed by incandescent lighting.  However, the phosphor powder inside fluorescent bulbs contains mercury, which is toxic, making a broken bulb a potential hazard.  If a fluorescent lamp breaks indoors, close off the room and contact Hazardous Materials Management and the EH&S Manager.

A number of companies recycle fluorescent light bulbs according to the appropriate federal and state regulations for later reuse.  Always take care not to break bulbs to avoid releasing mercury vapors to the air.  Follow these best management practices for disposal of spent fluorescent lamps:

  • Store unbroken lamps in a box or fiber drum to prevent breakage.
  • Label the container “Universal Waste - Spent Fluorescent Lamps”.
  • Use an authorized lamp recycler to collect lamps or deliver the lamps to a hazardous waste transporter.

Mercury-Containing Items

Mercury is very toxic and has contributed to significant pollution of the environment.  It can be found in thermometers, thermostats, barometer, switches, and fluorescent bulbs. The good news is that through alternative uses such as digital thermometers and mercury-free thermostats, the mercury hazard has decreased.  When feasible buy products containing little or no mercury.  To ensure that the disposal of a mercury-containing item is done appropriately follow these best management practices:

  • Never put mercury-containing items in the trash, outdoors or down drains.
  • Never touch or vacuum spilled mercury.
  • If spilled (1) isolate the area; (2) prevent the mercury from flowing into drains, cracks or crevices; (3) notify Hazardous Materials Management for approved clean up and disposal.

Asbestos

Asbestos is a naturally occurring fibrous mineral.  It is almost indestructible and can only be positively identified with a special type of microscope.  Asbestos may be found in many different products and many different places.  Examples of products that might contain asbestos are:

  • Sprayed-on fire proofing and insulation in buildings.
  • Insulation for pipes and boilers.
  • Wall and ceiling insulation.
  • Ceiling tiles.
  • Floor tiles.

Asbestos materials present a potential hazard only if the asbestos containing material (ACM) can be easily broken up by hand (called friability) and becomes airborne.  ACM that is not friable and in good condition can be safely managed in buildings.

The DU Asbestos policy must be followed when suspected or confirmed asbestos materials may be disturbed.  Follow these best management practices regarding asbestos:

  • If a damaged or deteriorated material that may be asbestos is observed, avoid contact with the material.  Notify the EH&S Manager so that the material can be verified as to its asbestos content.
  • Prior to beginning demolition or renovation work, an asbestos inspection must be conducted by a Colorado State licensed inspector to identify all ACM in the areas where work will be performed.
  • Any ACM that remains in the building should be labeled to prevent inadvertent disturbance.  
  • Inspections of ACM should be performed every six months by a Colorado State licensed inspector to assess the condition of ACM.
  • All personnel who may potentially disturb any ACM should complete two hour asbestos awareness training.
  • The facility emergency plan should include a scenario for response to an unplanned release of ACM.  The EH&S Manager should be notified immediately of an asbestos fiber release episode. 

Lead Paint

Lead is a very toxic material that can enter the body by inhalation (breathing) or ingestion (eating).  Lead exposure is perhaps the oldest know occupation health hazard.  Long term exposures can cause disorders such as headaches, poor appetite, dizziness, and muscle weakness.  It has the potential to cause irreversible health effects to the nervous system and the reproductive system.  Children are at the greatest risk to lead poisoning due to the rapid development of the neurological system.

The predominant workplace source for lead is in lead–based paint (LBP).  The good news is that almost all of the paint used in the industry is lead-free paint.  If LBP is present it does not become a hazard unless the paint material is eaten or the material becomes airborne whereby it could be inhaled.  Removal or disruption of lead containing materials must be conducted in accordance with appropriate regulating agencies and with the University of Denver Lead Exposure Plan.  Even when not required by environmental regulations, the following best management practices are recommended:

  • Leftover paint should be labeled as "latex" or "oil-based".  New latex paint is usually labeled as such or has instructions to clean up with water.  
  • Lead-free latex paint may be allowed to dry completely and then discarded in the trash as a non-hazardous solid waste.   
  • Oil-based materials should not be disposed of through the trash stream.
  • Liquid paint should never be put in the trash or poured down the drain.

Conservation/Recycling Measures

Below are strategies that provide both environmental and economical benefits:

  • Encourage suppliers to minimize the amount of packaging they use to protect their products.
  • Use durable, reusable products rather than single-use materials.
  • Reduce the use of hazardous constituents in your waste streams by using substitute products that are free of hazardous materials.
  • Design a system of collection that sorts the waste generated on campus, such as bottles, cans, paper and corrugated cardboard, for recycling.
  • Promote recycling efforts on campus to students, faculty and staff, and periodically report the status of the recycling program and the progress that has been made.
  • Establish a campus-wide double-sided photocopying policy.
  • Reuse envelopes for intra-campus use or use two-way (“send-n-return”) envelopes.
  • Send bulletins via electronic mail or set up a central bulletin board for posted information to reduce the use of flyers.
  • Install reusable furnace and air conditioner filters in the residential life buildings.

Best management practices for individual water use:

  • Take short showers: turn water on to get wet, turn off water to lather up, and back on to rinse.
  • Don’t let water run while shaving or washing your face.  Brush teeth first while waiting for the water to get hot, then wash or shave after filling the basin.
  • Avoid flushing the toilet unnecessarily.  Dispose of tissues, insects and other similar waste in the trash rather than the toilet.
  • Operate automatic dishwashers and clothes dryers only when they are fully loaded.
  • When washing dishes by hand, fill one sink or basin with soapy water and quickly rinse under a slow moving stream from the faucet.
  • Store drinking water in the refrigerator to avoid letting the tap run while waiting for cool water to flow.
  • Avoid using running water to thaw meat or other frozen foods.  Defrost food overnight in the refrigerator.

Best management practices for Facilities-level water use:

  • Verify that buildings are “leak free” by reading the water meter before and after a two-hour period when no water is being used.
  • Repair dripping faucets by replacing washers.
  • Periodically inspect toilets for operational efficiency.
  • Replace malfunctioning toilet handles.  When purchasing new or replacement toilets, consider low-volume units, which use less than half the water of older models.

Grounds/Vehicles

At the Physical Plant there are many activities relating to hazardous waste.  Please reference the Hazardous Materials Management policy for guidance on purchasing chemicals, managing chemical waste, and controlling spills.    Review the following best management practices, for ways to enhance worker safety and reduce operating costs by minimizing waste and preventing costly clean up. 

Aboveground Storage Tanks

Governmental regulations have specific requirements for aboveground storage tank (AST) such as the reporting of certain chemicals at various quantities.  To minimize the potential for fuel spills and during vehicle and equipment fueling:

  • Cover catch basins with storm drain covers while fueling.
  • Make certain that spill kits containing dry, absorbent materials for spill response are located near the area of fueling and that staff are trained in their use.
  • Ensure that the transfer of fuel from and to fuel tanks and/or aboveground storage tanks is monitored by an attendant.
  • Provide spill response training for personnel.
  • Post signs that give fueling instructions, spill response procedures, emergency contact information and best management practices.
  • Check loading/unloading equipment (valves, pumps, flanges, and connections) regularly for leaks.  Replace worn or broken equipment.
  • Avoid transferring materials close to storm drain inlets.

Employee Training

Training employees in proper procedures helps to reduce the risks associated with environmental pollution and accidents.  The Supervisor or Manager is responsible for ensuring his/her employees are adequately trained on the following: 

  • Spill response for personnel who handle hazardous material
  • Fork lift training
  • Stormwater pollution prevention education
  • Right-to-know awareness training
  • Hazardous materials management
  • Emergency preparedness
  • Awareness-level training, for example, a general overview of the school's environmental management system

Conservation/Recycling

To minimize the consumption of fresh water associated with your campus' landscaping and grounds maintenance activities, consider the following best management practices:

  • Use native or other low water use plants (e.g., ground cover).
  • Plant drought resistant grass and consider reducing the turf area of lawns.
  • Avoid over fertilizing lawns.
  • Use fertilizers that contain slow-release, water-insoluble forms of nitrogen.
  • When mowing, raise the blade to at least 3 inches high, or to its highest level.
  • Use a layer of mulch around plants to reduce evaporation and promote plant growth.   
  • Adjust watering habits so that the optimal range of moisture in the soil is maintained at all times.
  • Water lawns only as needed, and always water during the coolest time of the day to minimize evaporation.
  • Adjust sprinklers so that only the lawn is watered and not paved surfaces or buildings.
  • Do not water on windy days.
  • Install rain shut-off devices on in-ground irrigation systems to avoid watering lawns during rain events.
  • Use a rain gauge to determine how much rain or irrigation the lawns have received.
  • Consider using cisterns or rain barrels to capture rainwater for use for watering plants and flowers.  Place a mesh fabric, a lid or several drops of baby oil on the water surface to prevent mosquitoes from breeding.

Drums

Regulations provide the requirements for proper storage, containment, and labeling of drums.  In addition to these requirements, these best management practices should be followed to protect the environment:

  • Perform regular housekeeping activities in waste storage areas.
  • Reuse or recycle materials whenever possible.
  • Inspect waste management areas for spills and waste management containers for leaks.
  • Track waste generated, evaluate the process generating the waste and look for ways to reduce waste generation.
  • Characterize waste streams.
  • Find substitutes for harmful chemicals and properly dispose of unusable chemical inventory.
  • Segregate and separate wastes.
  • Do not dispose of liquid wastes such as oils or hazardous materials into dumpsters.
  • Maintain adequate supplies of spill response equipment and materials in accessible locations near areas where spills may be likely to occur.
  • Equip waste transport vehicles with spill containment equipment.
  • Perform and document in a logbook periodic inspections of hazardous and non-hazardous waste storage areas.  Inspection items should include the following: external corrosion, structural failure, spills and overfills due to operator failure, failure of piping system (pipes, pumps, flanges, couplings, hoses, and valves), visually inspect new tanks or containers for loose fittings, poor welds, and improper or poorly fitted gaskets, and inspect tank foundations and storage area coatings.

Floor Drains

Pouring or dumping chemicals down the floor drain can damage the municipal waste disposal system.  Make sure you understand what chemicals can be put down the floor drains.  When performing general vehicle repair/maintenance work near floor drains, the following best management practices are recommended.

  • Drain and crush oil filters before recycling or disposal. 
  • Drain and properly dispose of all fluids and remove batteries from vehicles, and equipment.
  • Use biodegradable products and substitute materials with less hazardous properties when feasible.
  • Use water-based cleaning agents or non-chlorinated solvents to clean equipment.
  • Store mechanical parts and equipment that may yield even small amounts of contaminants (i.e., oil or grease) away from drains.
  • Sweep or vacuum the shop floor frequently.
  • Designate specific areas indoors for parts cleaning.
  • Clean up any spills promptly.
  • Keep rags, mops, absorbents, and other cleanup supplies readily accessible to all work areas.
  • Never sweep or flush wastes into a floor drain.
  • Promptly transfer drained fluids to a designated waste storage area.
  • Place bulk fluids, waste fluids, and batteries in secondary containment to capture accidental spills.
  • Service bays within the facility should be segregated by operation (brakes, radiator, oil changing, etc.) to avoid cross-contamination.

Lead-acid Batteries

Lead-acid batteries are a significant concern health hazard due to the associated toxicity of lead and the corrosive sulfuric acid that is a constituent of lead-acid.  Additionally, improperly disposing of lead-acid batteries can pollute soil and water.  Consider these best management practices for handling lead-acid batteries:

  • Wear acid-resistant gloves and safety glasses.
  • Double-bag damaged batteries in polyethylene plastic bags that are at least 6-mils in thickness.
  • Small quantities of lead-acid batteries should be stored in acid-resistant tubs; large quantities should be stored in an isolated area with no floor drains; and spent lead acid batteries should be stored indoors and on an impervious surface.
  • Storage areas should be sealed with an acid-resistant material and have a containment berm.
  • Do not stack lead-acid batteries because it increases the risk of short circuits and acid leaks.
  • Keep the following supplies in your lead-acid battery storage area: acid-resistant gloves; a supply of polyethylene plastic bags; rags or disposable wipes for acid leak clean-up; appropriate absorbent for spill clean-up; and a weather-resistant pen or marker for marking used or damaged batteries with the date they were taken out of service.
  • Provide an eyewash station in the area, or a sign indicating the location of the nearest eyewash.
  • Keep a supply of lime or baking soda on hand to neutralize acid spills.
  • If there is a battery acid spill: a) double-bag the leaking battery in 6 mil polyethylene plastic bags; b) clean the spilled battery acid with rags or disposable wipes and use appropriate absorbent; and c) manage the clean-up material as hazardous waste by placing it in an acid debris waste accumulation container. Contact Hazardous Materials Management regarding proper disposal. 

Paints/Aerosols

Paint materials and aerosol cans present potential environmental hazards.  Listed below are best management practices to follow:

  • Implement a "first in, first out" use pattern for aerosol cans and order new cans on an as needed basis to ensure that cans are used up prior to opening new cans.
  • Carefully determine whether spent aerosol cans are hazardous or non-hazardous. If contents and/or propellant remain(s) in the can, it is likely a hazardous waste. 
  • To minimize disposal costs, ensure that truly empty aerosol containers are either sent to a scrap-metal recycler or disposed of in the trash.
  • Minimize excess liquid paint by making efficient use of paint "poured" for use.
  • Require contractor/hauler adherence to best management practices.  Verify proper waste disposal practices of contractors.
  • Protect all loading/unloading activities from rainfall, run-on and wind dispersal to the maximum extent practicable. 
  • Maintain adequate supplies of spill response equipment and materials in accessible locations near areas where spills may be likely to occur.
  • Clean-up minor spills immediately.
  • Conduct regular inspections of storage and containment equipment and promptly correct deficiencies to this equipment as necessary.  
  • Store all materials in their original containers or containers approved for that use. Ensure that all containers are appropriately sealed.
  • Properly label all chemical containers with information, including their contents, hazards, spill response and first aid procedures, manufacturer's name and address, and storage requirements.  Maintain copies of Material Safety Data Sheets on file for any materials stored and/or handled.
  • Reduce the quantities of chemicals stored outside to the minimum volume required based on variables such as release potential, usage, storage capacity, and chemical shelf life.
  • Post signs at all chemical storage locations in clearly visible locations noting the materials stored, emergency contacts, and spill cleanup procedures.
  • Perform and document periodic inspections in a logbook.  Inspection items should include the following: external corrosion, structural failure, spills and overfills due to operator error, failure of piping system.

Pesticides

The environmental hazards associated with pesticides vary from being relatively innocuous to extremely harmful to the groundwater or surface water and to animals.  The associated hazards may be due to toxicity, amounts used, and concentration of the material.  Even when not required by regulations, the following best management practices are recommended:

  • Keep pesticides dry and out of the way of activities that might puncture or knock over a jug or rip open a bag or box.
  • Put a curb around the floor to prevent chemicals from spreading to other areas, if pesticides spill.
  • Clean up any spills immediately to avoid absorption into the ground and flooring including concrete or asphalt which can absorb material.     
  • Post best management practices related to pesticides on the walls of the grounds/vehicle maintenance facility so that they are easily accessible and remind the staff to handle pesticides properly.
  • Provide secondary containment around the storage area, which will minimize theamount of pesticide seeping into the ground if a bulk liquid pesticide storage container should leak.
  • Store pesticides in original containers that are closed, labeled, and in a secure area out of reach of unauthorized personnel.
  • When handling pesticides use the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), including respiratory protection as indicated by the hazardous assessment.
  • Do not use or give away banned pesticides or pesticides that are no longer registered for use.
  • Do not reuse pesticide containers.
  • Follow the manufacturer’s recommendations for disposal.  Contact Hazardous Materials Management for any questions about disposal.

Solvents/Parts Washings

The best way to mitigate the accumulation of hazardous waste regarding solvents is to replace chlorinated solvents with safer, environmentally friendly chemicals.  This substitution not only makes it safer for the workers, it reduces certain compliance issues if the material is not considered to be hazardous waste.  Here are prudent practices when working with parts cleaners and degreasers and during the handling or disposal of hazardous waste:

Keep the parts cleaner closed when not in use.

  • Reduce solvent evaporation by increasing freeboard and placing hoods or coverson all parts cleaning tanks.
  • Use one multi-purpose solvent instead of many different solvents to increase the recycle potential of the solvent.
  • Consider using a service to maintain your parts cleaning unit.
  • Consider pre-cleaning parts with a rag or wire brush.
  • Perform regular housekeeping activities in waste storage areas.
  • Reuse or recycle materials whenever possible.
  • Inspect waste management areas for spills and waste management containers for leaks.
  • Track waste generated, evaluate the process generating the waste and look forways to reduce waste generation.
  • Characterize waste streams.
  • Segregate wastes by compatibility.
  • Do not dispose of liquid wastes such as oils or hazardous materials into dumpsters.
  • Maintain adequate supplies of spill response equipment and materials in accessible locations near areas where spills may be likely to occur.
  • Equip waste transport vehicles with spill containment equipment.

Transformers

Transformers are an environmental concern if they contain polychlorinated biphenyls or PCBs.  The EPA treats all PCBs as being potentially hazardous.  Although PCBs are no longer produced or used in the United States today, some transformers may still contain PCBs.  All transformers on campus should be labeled identifying the owner, i.e. the electrical company or the university, and whether or not it contains PCBs.  The following best management practices are recommended for PCB containing transformers:

  • Secondary containment should be provided that prevent release of material into building floor drains, soil, or water, in the event of a spill or leak.  
  • Transformer oil should be stored in proper storage containers such as steel drums without a removable head designed, constructed and operated with safety requirements for flammable and combustible liquids.

Underground Storage Tanks

Federal regulations apply to underground storage tanks (UST) storing petroleum or certain hazardous substances.  The following best management practices should be followed regarding the fuel USTs on campus:

  • Cover catch basins with storm drain covers while fueling.
  • Make certain that spill kits containing dry, absorbent materials for spill response are located near the area of fueling and that staff are trained in their use.
  • Ensure that fuel transfers from/to vehicle fuel tanks and/or underground storage tanks are monitored by an attendant.
  • Provide spill response training for personnel.
  • Post signs that give fueling instructions, spill response procedures, emergency contact information, and best management practices.
  • Check loading/unloading equipment (valves, pumps, flanges, and connections) regularly for leaks.  Replace worn or broken equipment.

Vehicle use

The following best management practices are recommended for vehicle use:

  • Keep tire pressure at the recommended level to improve fuel efficiency.
  • Ensure the vehicle's exhaust meets inspection requirements.
  • Ensure that your equipment/vehicles undergo regular tune-ups.
  • Avoid idling to conserve fuel.

Waste Oils

The following best management practices are recommended regarding waste oils:

  • Recyclewaste oil instead of disposing of it.
  • Check to see whether mixing used oil with other petroleum products or solvents triggers a different waste classification.
  • Avoid transferring materials close to storm drain inlets.
  • Transfer liquids only in paved areas.
  • Protect all loading/unloading activities from rainfall, run-on and wind dispersal to the maximum extent practicable.   
  • Maintain adequate supplies of spill response equipment and materials in accessible locations near areas where spills may be likely to occur.
  • Clean up minor spills immediately.
  • Conduct regular inspections of storage and containment equipment and promptly correct deficiencies to this equipment as necessary.
  • Properly label all chemical containers with information, including their contents, hazards, spill response and first aid procedures, manufacturer's name and address, and storage requirements.  Maintain copies of MSDS on file for any materials stored and/or handled.
  • Reduce the quantities of chemicals stored outside to the minimum volume required based on variables such as release potential, usage, storage capacity, and chemical shelf life.

Power Plant

Blowdown Water

Blowdown water is water that is released from a boiler to remove impurities and sediment.  Since blowdown water is an industrial wastewater it is essential to mitigate the potential impact to the environment by reducing the volume and hazardous make-up of blowdown water.  Follow these best management practices:

  • Minimize the volume of blowdown water by optimizing the frequency of cleaning boilers.
  • Consider controlling the composition of the boiler feed water through an elevated oxygen treatment process.
  • Consider inspecting for and replacing seals on the steam cycle appurtenances.
  • Consider establishing a boiler cleaning frequency that is set according to the build-up of scale, rather than simply a predetermined schedule. 
  • Consider using on-line cleaning, which entails cleaning the boiler with a sodium polyacrylate injection while it continues to operate.  

Cooling Water

Regulations are in place with regard to cooling water discharges and what chemical additives are acceptable.  The cooling tower(s) should be properly maintained according to the manufacturer's specifications.  Schedule routine monitoring and maintenance activities to ensure the cooling tower(s) operate effectively.

Recycling

Recycling programs are a great way to reduce various types of waste.  Consider these best management practices:

  • Maintain an inventory of used equipment, tools, solvents, paints and cleaners that can be used by other departments at the school.  Train employees to check inventory of materials on hand before purchasing new items, chemicals, paints and cleaners.
  • Used oil, and lubricants can be added to fuel oil and burned in oil burners and furnaces or sent off site to be refined and reused.
  • Investigate the potential for using your local community for recycling programs for the following:
    - Lead acid batteries
    - Pallets
    - Drums and containers
    - Toner cartridges
    - Paper and cardboard
    - Glass
    - Copper and other metals

Stormwater

Stormwater, which is essentially any precipitation that flows onto building structures, including construction sites, and into a nearby water body, can potentially damage water systems.  State and federal regulations are in place to control stormwater from municipal and industrial discharges, in order to protect water quality.  Even when not required by regulations follow these best management practices:

  • Keep outdoor areas clean and free from litter.  Sweep walkways and roadways.
  • Cover all dumpsters to prevent the infiltration of rainfall or snow and the leach out of oil and other contaminants.
  • Prevent and respond to spills quickly.  Keep adequate spill response kits and equipment available to respond to spills of oil, fuel, grease and other material.
  • Minimize the use of fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, perhaps by implementing an Integrated Pest Management (IPM) program.
  • Clean up leaves and lawn clippings so they don't enter and clog the stormwater collection systems.
  • Encourage employees not to litter by placing trashcans in strategic locations.
  • Train employees in the importance of stormwater pollution control.  Some employees should be trained in spill response techniques.  
  • Invest in appropriate treatment and stormwater control infrastructure including drop inlets, channels, retention and detention basins, treatment vaults, infiltration galleries, filters, oil/water separators, etc.
  • Perform periodic inspections to identify potential sources of stormwater pollution and assess effectiveness of control measures.

Waste Storage   

Waste is generated everyday so it’s important that proper waste management be maintained.  Please reference the Hazardous Materials Management policy for guidance on managing chemical waste and controlling spills.  Good management practices include identifying, containerizing, and segregating waste.  It also includes ensuring personnel are adequately trained on waste procedures and on emergencies that may arise. 

Follow these best management practices for waste storage:

  • Chemical waste should be appropriately labeled and segregated from incompatible materials.  Each container must have a label when waste is first placed in it that includes the name, room #, building, and department or unit.  A list of all components of commingled waste should be provided.
  • Train employees on proper procedures for storing waste.
  • Maintain good general housekeeping, including keeping aisles and walkways clear.
  • Minimize the amount of chemicals stored to the minimum quantities needed to avoid having to dispose of chemicals that expire or deteriorate during storage.
  • Inspect waste storage areas for integrity of containers and secondary containment, and proper identification of chemicals.  Inspections should be documented, including findings and recommended corrective actions.

For Emergency Planning:

  • Each hazardous waste storage area should have a written emergency response plan that identifies potential emergencies with associated hazards, the rolls and responsibilities of personnel, what personal protective equipment will be worn, and how the spill or emergency will be controlled, evacuation or isolation procedures.
  • Maintain emergency equipment, including emergency eyewash stations and showers, spill kits, fire extinguishers, fire blankets, and first aid kits.
  • Perform periodic inspections to ensure emergency equipment is adequate.