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Featured Events

Presentation: "Community Land Trusts: Using Legal Land-Use Mechanisms to Combat Spatial Inequality"

Thursday, May 26, 3:45-5 p.m.—Boettcher Auditorium, Room 101
The Department of Geography and the Environment Colloquium series present a lecture by Jennifer-Grace Ewa, Postdoctoral Fellow in Open Space, Interdisciplinary Research Incubator for the Study of (In)Equality (IRISE), University of Denver. Her presentation will examine the extreme pressures exerted on Denver by an increase in population, a phenomenon that has greatly impacted Denver's economy as highly skilled millennials flock to its neighborhoods. There are obvious negative ramifications that impact Denver's poor and minority communities, including gentrification and displacement. In conjunction with the above issues, Ewa will consider Community Land Trusts (CLT), which have the ability to acquire property in order to preserve affordable housing to qualified residents in an effort to mitigate the displacement of poor and underrepresented communities in Denver.

Rising Stars: Denver Civic Ballet and Ballet Guild exhibit currently on display

Reception: Friday, June 10, 6-8 p.m.—AAC, Room 290
The exhibit Rising Stars: Denver Civic Ballet and Ballet Guild is on display through November 2016 on the upper level of the Anderson Academic Commons. A library-made documentary to accompany the exhibit will debut at a reception on Friday, June 10th, 2016 at 6 pm. All are welcome to attend the reception. RSVP for June 10 reception and film. 

This exhibit explores the history and impact of the Denver Civic Ballet, Denver's first semi-professional ballet company, and its support organization, the Denver Civic Ballet Guild. The company hosted world-renowned artistic directors and guest artists from the American Ballet Theatre and other international companies, bringing the sophistication of professional ballet to Denver for the first time. Though the company folded in 1979 after 21 years of performances, it was a launching pad for dance notables who have had a lasting impact on dance, and are profiled in the exhibit. The guild continues today as the Denver Ballet Guild.

2016 Herbert Howe Lecture Series –Exotic Symmetries in String Theory

Tuesday, May 17, 4-5 p.m.—Olin 105
Please join the Division of Natural Sciences & Mathematics for the annual Herbert Howe public lecture. Mathai Varghese from the University of Adelaide, Australia, will present "Exotic Symmetries in String Theory." String theory, also known as the "Theory of Everything," attempts to unify the fundamental theories of physics, including general relativity, quantum theory and electromagnetism. String Theory has peculiar symmetries called dualities. Varghese's goal in this non-mathematical presentation is to illustrate these dualities via examples, as well as to provide an historical introduction to the topic. A reception will follow the talk. Learn more about the Herbert Howe Lecture Series.

Celebration of life: Remembering Theodore R. Zerwin

Thursday, May 19, 1-2 p.m.—Sie Complex, first floor forum
Please join us in remembering and celebrating the life of former Korbel professor Theodore ("Ted") R. Zerwin, July 15, 1937-Feb. 8, 2016. Coffee and pastries provided.

Outdoor movie night—Jurassic World

Thursday, May 19, 7:45 p.m.—Olin Green
Please join the Division of Natural Sciences & Mathematics for games, snacks and an outdoor showing of Jurassic World. Bring a blanket and jacket. Everyone welcome to attend.

"Denver Dialogues: Rigorous and Relevant Research in Global Affairs"—panel discussion

Tuesday, May 24, noon-1:30 p.m.—Sie Complex, fifth floor event space
How can academics "bridge the gap" to make their work relevant and accessible for policymakers, practitioners and the broader community? In October 2014, the Carnegie Corporation of New York granted five premier international affairs schools, including the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, the chance to answer this question. Join the Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy for a Denver Dialogues luncheon, where representatives from all five schools will discuss their innovative projects, share lessons learned and identify future opportunities for universities to contribute to the public good. Learn more and RSVP. Lunch provided

Retirement reception for Don McCubbrey

Thursday, May 26, 3-5 p.m.—Daniels College of Business, Schneider Boardroom
The Daniels College of Business is hosting a retirement reception for Don McCubbrey, who is retiring after 32 years at DU. While at DU he served in various leadership positions at Daniels including 15 years as department chair of Information Technology and Electronic Commerce (now Business Information and Analytics). He also served in the University Faculty Senate and was president from 2010-2012. Active in the Colorado technology community, he was a co-founder, along with Bob Newman, of the Colorado Technology Association and is now an emeritus director. He looks forward to greeting his friends from Daniels and across the University. Please stop by and wish him well.

Documentary screening: How to Survive a Plague

Tuesday, May 17, 5-7 p.m.—Sturm Hall, room 253
Please join the Council of Global Health and Development for a screening of the documentary How to Survive a Plague. It chronicles the story of the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power or ACT UP. Refreshments will be served. Please contact faculty advisor, Sheila Davis (sheila.davis@du.edu) for more information.

OTL (h)Appy Hour: Listly & Piktochart

Thursday, May 19, 3:30-4:30 p.m.—OTL conference room (AAC 345)
Please join us for the next (h)Appy Hour with the Office of Teaching and Learning. (h)Appy Hour is an informal gathering intended to provide a space where DU faculty, staff and students can mingle while discovering new ideas for incorporating web, tablet and mobile applications into the learning experience. During this (h)Appy Hour, we will explore and brainstorm new ways for using Listly (a social bookmarking tool for sharing online content), and Piktochart (a web-based infographic authoring tool).Come as you are and enjoy a truly informal celebration and exploration of ideas. For additional information view the full OTL blog post or register.

Film Screening: ACRONYM: The Cross-Generational Battle with PTSD

Monday, May 23, 5:30 p.m.—Davis Auditorium at Sturm Hall
Please join us for a screening of the documentary, ACRONYM: The Cross-Generational Battle with PTSD. ACRONYM takes an in-depth and personal look at those who are experiencing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), featuring interviews with U.S. veterans from WWII, Korea, Vietnam, Gulf Wars I and II, Somalia, Iraq and Afghanistan. It also presents traditional and non-traditional therapies and treatments. After the film, please stay for a reception to celebrate the opening of the Graduate School of Professional Psychology's new mental health clinic for veterans, service members and their families— The Sturm Center. Film screening and reception are both free and open to the public. Watch the film trailer and RSVP to attend.

Colorado Care and Single Payer Health Care in Colorado—State Senator Irene Aguilar, MD

Tuesday, May 3, 5 p.m.—Sie Complex 5th floor event space
Join Global Health Affairs as we host State Senator Irene Aguilar, MD, who currently serves Colorado's District 32. She is the only practicing physician in the Colorado state legislature. In the Colorado Senate, Dr. Aguilar serves on the Senate Committee on Health and Human Services, the Colorado Health Benefit Exchange Review Committee and the Judiciary Committee. She is the force behind the creation of ColoradoCare, amendment 69, which would create a universal health care system in the state of Colorado. Amendment 69 will be on the November 2016 ballot. Food will be provided.

Presentation: "Managing Disputes Over Science in a Water Resource Agency"

Thursday, May 5, 3:45-5 p.m.—Boettcher Auditorium, room 101
The Department of Geography and the Environment Colloquium series presents the Laurance C. Herold Memorial Lecture, given by Dr. Douglas Clark, U.S. Bureau of Reclamation. The Bureau of Reclamation makes numerous water management decisions to fulfill its mission to "manage, develop, and protect water and related resources in an environmentally and economically sound manner in the interest of the American public." Sometimes, however, disagreements over technical data, scientific methods, research findings, or the interpretation of those findings are sufficiently serious to impede water allocation decision-making. This talk will discuss the types of disputes over science that arise, their prevalence and some possible approaches for managing them.

university of denver new beginnings powwow

Sunday, May 8, beginning at 11 a.m.-Driscoll Green
The 6th Annual New Beginnings Powwow will feature plenty of attractions, including Native American jewelry and crafts, food and traditional dancing. Stop by and experience an incredible cultural event. Organized by the DU Native Student Alliance.

"The Business of Healthcare" lecture given by Linda Rosenberg

Thursday, May 12, 5-6:30 p.m.—Craig Hall, Boettcher Foundation Community Room
The Graduate School of Social Work welcomes Linda Rosenberg, president and CEO of the National Council for Community Behavioral Healthcare. The event is free and open to the public; registration is required by May 6.

Opening reception for the student art show

Thursday, May 12, 5-7 p.m.—Vicki Myhren Gallery
To end this year's exhibition schedule, the Vicki Myhren Gallery will host a Student Art Show, which will run from May 12-27. The show is a compilation of artwork by students across all disciplines at the University of Denver. Viviane Le Courtois, program and gallery manager, Downtown Aurora Visual Arts (DAVA) and DU alum, will serve as juror. Join us for the opening reception for light refreshments and conversation. This event is free and open to the public.

From Principles to Practice: Supporting On-the-ground Implementation of Business and Human Rights Multistakeholder Initiatives

Wednesday, May 18, 12:15 p.m., Sie Complex 1150 (formerly room Sié 150)
The Sié Center and the Daniels College of Business are pleased to present Anne-Marie Buzatu, deputy head of Public-Private Partnerships Division at the Geneva Centre for the Democratic Control of Armed Forces' (DCAF). Buzatu will discuss how to support effective, on-the-ground implementation of the Voluntary Principles on Security and Human Rights and the International Code of Conduct for Private Security Service Providers. Lunch will be served. Please register.

Collecting and Collections, featuring Wesley Brown, collector, student and author of and about old maps

Thursday, May 19, 5:30-7 p.m.—AAC room 290
Co-founder and past president of the Rocky Mountain Map Society, Wes Brown will tell about being a collector–how he got into map collecting, some favorite stories, challenges and unexpected treasures of collecting. Please RSVP

Money Smart Week

April 26-28
Money Smart Week is a national initiative of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and the American Library Association. DU's University Libraries has partnered with Daniels College of Business, DU Bursar's Office, and US Bank to bring free financial literacy presentations and workshops to campus the week of April 25. More information

Marsico Visiting Scholar presentation: "Land Restoration on Easter Island: A Demonstration Project"

Thursday, April 28, 3:45-5 p.m.—Boettcher Auditorium, Room 101
The Department of Geography and the Environment present a Marsico Visiting Scholar lecture by Dr. Pablo A. Garcia-Chevesich, Department of Hydrology and Water Resources/Department of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineering, University of Arizona. Easter Island is a well-known example of how human settlement and forest clearance caused severe soil erosion, land degradation, and societal decline. This talk presents results from a demonstration project aimed at restoring land fertility so that local tribes will be able to reclaim their ancestral land and produce agricultural commodities for export. The project has broad relevance for understanding land management, agricultural sustainability, soil erosion, landscape restoration, and societal resilience.

Resistance and Recovery

Thursday, April 28, 5-7 p.m.—Sturm Hall room 286
How have Latin American countries recovered from state terror and the trauma of repression? Join the University of Denver Museum of Anthropology for a panel discussion with DU faculty: Dr. Esteban Gomez, Department of Anthropology; Dr. Rafael Ioris, Department of History; Dr. Aaron Schneider, Korbel School of International Studies; Dr. Matthew Taylor, Department of Geography. Presented in conjunction with Our Culture is Our Resistance: Repression, Refuge, and Healing in Guatemala, exhibited now in the gallery (Sturm 102) thru May 27, 2016

CEUCE and WorldDenver Present: An EU Day Celebration with The Konection Trio

Thursday, April 28, 6-9 p.m. - Sie Complex room 5025
The Konection Trio will play a mix of their own compositions and well-known Jazz standards arranged in a fresh and contemporary framework. The evening will include registration from 6-6:30, a program from 6:30-7:30 in which the band will perform as well as talk about multiculturalism, integration in the EU and music as a language. The Konection Trio will also reflect on possibilities using music as a tool to facilitate the integration of immigrants/refugees into their communities. The program will be followed by a Q&A session and a reception with appetizers, beer and wine. Tickets are $10, RSVP required.

The New Faces of Human Rights: Google as Government and Newmont as a Transnational Norm Entrepreneur

Friday, April 29, 12:15p.m., SIE COMPLEX 1150 (formerly room Sié 150)
Jason Pielemeier, Special Advisor and Head of the Internet Freedom, Business, and Human Rights Section in the State Department's Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor will discuss his career path and the Department's work in emerging areas of human rights policy and practice. Mr. Pielemeier is visiting the Sié Center at the Josef Korbel School as a practitioner-in-residence. Lunch will be served. Please register.

"Afro-Medieval Literature?" a Symposium on Temporality

Friday, April 29, 2:30-4:30 p.m.—Sturm Hall, room 451
Periodization is the organizing principle for English, History, Art History, and other humanities-related disciplines. It structures undergraduate and graduate curricula, faculty hires and professional conversations within and across these disciplines. And yet, it is fraught with problems, among them, the temporality of "ethnic literatures." Join Assistant Professor Cord Whitaker (Wellesley College), alongside DU professors Davor Balzar (physics), Hillary Hamann (geography), and Esteban Gomez (anthropology), in a discussion on the relationship between temporality and academic disciplinarily. This event is generously sponsored by the Department of English, the AHSS Dean's Office, the Office of Graduate Studies, and the Center for Multicultural Excellence.

Author talk with DU alum Mike Rosen

Wednesday, May 4, 5 p.m.—AAC room 290
Political commentator Mike Rosen BSBA '72, MBA '75 hosts a talk show on radio station 850 KOA in Denver, and writes a weekly opinion column for the Denver Post. He will read from his new book Reality: A Plain-Talk Guide to Economics, Politics, Government and Culture which will also be for sale at the event. Please RSVP

CCUSC Sabel Awards dinner and presentations

Wednesday, May 4, 4:30-9 p.m.—Sie Complex, fifth floor event room
We hope you will join the Center for China—U.S. Cooperation (CCUSC) for a dinner event to celebrate the Inaugural Annual John and Vivian Sabel Award of the best article in The Journal of Contemporary China. This event is open to the public. Register

Chaplain's book discussion: Shared Stories, Rival Tellings by Robert Gregg

Wednesday, May 4, noon—Driscoll North, Commerce Room
Shared Stories, Rival Tellings explores the early exchanges of Jews, Christians, and Muslims, and argues that their interactions were dominated by debates over the meanings of certain stories sacred to all three communities. Robert C. Gregg shows how Jewish, Christian, and Muslim interpreters--artists as well as authors--developed their unique and particular understandings of narratives present in the two Bibles and the Qur'an. As he guides us through the often intentional variations introduced into these shared stories, Gregg exposes major issues under contention and the social-intellectual forces that contributed to spirited, and sometimes combative, exchanges among Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Prof. Andrea Stanton of Religious Studies will co-facilitate. Copies of the chapters and more information

Maureen Cummins: Delving into the Poetics of Torture

Friday, May 6, 2-3 p.m.—The Loft, AAC room 340
Visual artist Maureen Cummins returns to the University Libraries to present on six of her artist's books, all of which delve into the subject of physical and psychological torture. Cummins' works use form, imagery, and language to expose contradictions and challenge received knowledge through her visual narratives. Her works incorporate found and archival objects, which reveal the "bodily trace" and real human impact of torture. Her featured artist books are Crazy Quilt, Cherished, Beloved, and Most Wanted, Divide and Conquer, Femme Fatales, Stocks and Bonds, and The Poetics of Torture*. Visit Maureen Cummins website to learn more about the artist and her works. Program is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Reserve your seat now online or call 303-871-3074.

Higher education public policy event: College Completion in the 21st Century

Tuesday, May 10, 5:30-7:30 p.m.—Ruffatto Hall Commons
The Department of Higher Education at the Morgridge College of Education presents the Higher Education Public Policy Event: College Completion in the 21st Century. All members of the University and the public are invited to attend. The event will include a networking reception, panel discussion moderated by Higher Education faculty Drs. Cecilia Orphan and Laura Sponsler, and opportunity for discussion. Panelists for the event include Alison R. Griffin, Senior Vice President of External and Government Relations, USA Funds; Dr. Demarée K. Michelau, Director of Policy Analysis, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education; Jennifer Sobanet, Chief Operating Officer, Colorado Department of Higher Education; and Dr. Brian A. Sponsler, Director of the Postsecondary & Workforce Development Institute, Education Commission of the States. Register here.

Exhibits in Anderson Academic Commons

Visit the following exhibits currently on display in the AAC:
To the Things That Matter: A Community Collaborative for Social Change
Now through June 6, upper level walls outside The Loft
This exhibit dedicates itself as both a recognition of the work that has been completed by student, faculty and community activists at the University of Denver and a call for greater commitment to making change on the things that matter.
meditate on politics by jayne butler, emergent digital practices MFA
Now through June 6, lower level at the AAC and 4th Floor East in the Bonfils Stanton Music Library
this series studies the candidates of the 2016 U.S. presidential primaries and subsequent election. each candidate is surrounded by shapes and patterns in the form of a mandala to represent their political platform.
Playful & Inviting: Publicity Posters of Theatre Productions at DU in the 1950s
Now through June 17, upper level near main staircase
This exhibit showcases a series of colorful posters usually hidden in the drawers of Special Collections & Archives and silently revives the captivating performances and festivals staged at the University of Denver in the early 1950s.
Rising Stars: Denver Civic Ballet and Ballet Guild
May 3-Nov. 30, upper level near the Dean's Suite (AAC 370)
This exhibit explores the history and impact of the Denver Civic Ballet, Denver's first semi-professional ballet company, and its support organization, the Denver Civic Ballet Guild.
Visit the current exhibits site for more information.

Daniels Finance Forum: Private Equity–Three Perspectives

Wednesday, May 11—The Cable Center (7:30-8 a.m.-networking and breakfast; 8-8:45 a.m.-presentation; 8:45-9:30 a.m.-Q&A and final remarks)
Bain & Company's Global Private Equity Report 2016 offers a comprehensive view of the challenges that private equity faces following a decade of volatility and change, as well as what it will take to succeed in 2016. Hear from private equity professionals Charlie Gwirtsman, John Zimmerman and Dale Martin, in response to Bain's report. RSVP to stefeni.may@du.edu by May 9.

DU Vin Festival

DU Vin Wine Dinner—Thursday, May 12
DU Vin Grand Tasting—Saturday, May 14
The DU Vin Festival features something for everyone including a five-course wine pairing dinner with a special guest chef on Thursday, May 12 and a grand wine tasting event on Saturday, May 14 complete with over 100 different wines to taste and food samplings from Denver area restaurants, three complimentary seminars on wine and food topics, a chef/student pairing challenge with local Denver restaurants and live music! DU faculty, staff and alumni can purchase discount tickets of $38.95 per ticket for the grand tasting. More

DU StoryCorps: Making connections through storytelling

Tuesday, May 19, 4:30-6:30 p.m.—Margery Reed Hall, Reiman Theater
Join the DU Leadership Academy in launching the inaugural storytelling event for students, faculty and staff. Prepare a five-minute true story about the time you were a "Fish Out of Water." ...a time when you felt totally out of your element, whether you felt like an outsider, you were a foreigner traveling in a new country, a rookie on the new job, or in some other unfamiliar and uncomfortable situation. Eight storytellers will share their story on Tuesday, May 10th. For more information, email carolyn.sommers@du.edu. To attend the event, RSVP is requested, though not required. Free and open to all.

student activist speaker: Sofie Karasek

Tuesday, April 19, 6:30 p.m.—Sturm Hall, Davis Auditorium
The Student Coalition to Eradicate Sexual Assault welcomes Sofie Karasek, the Director of Education and Co-Founder of End Rape on Campus. She is a subject in the documentary film "The Hunting Ground" and has spearheaded several federal complaints against UC Berkeley, as well as assisting students nationwide in holding universities accountable to Title IX. Karasek will be speaking on student activism and ending rape on college campuses. Jean McAllister, DU's Title IX Coordinator, will be introducing Karasek and talking about the climate here at DU, followed by Karasek's keynote address, a Q&A session, and book signing.

Taiwan's 2016 elections and the implications for China-Taiwan relations

Wednesday, April 20, 5:15-6:30 p.m.—new SIE COMPLEX, 1st floor forum
The Center for China – U.S. Cooperation is pleased to host Dr. Richard Bush, senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and director of its Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies, and the Chen-Fu and Cecilia Yen Koo Chair in Taiwan Studies. Learn more and register

Sturm College of Law and the Center for Professional Development present DU Marijuana Summit

Wednesday, April 20, noon-5:30 p.m.
The University of Denver Sturm College of Law and the Center for Professional Development are proud to present the DU Marijuana Summit. Featuring speakers representing Denver Law, Daniels College of Business and the state of the science in psychology and biology, attendees can choose two of four workshops on hot topics in the law, business, psychology and biology fields. Discussions and workshops will focus on marijuana, the research behind it and the effects of legalization. Students, alumni, staff, faculty and members of the community are welcome to attend. Visit the site for information on pricing, speakers and to register.

OTL (h)Appy Hour

Thursday, April 21, 3:30-4:30 p.m.—OTL conference room (AAC 345)
During this (h)Appy Hour we will explore and brainstorm new ways for using Powtoon (an online animated presentation/video program), and Picmonkey (a web-based photo editing tool). Come as you are and enjoy a truly informal celebration and exploration of ideas. For additional information view the full OTL blog post or register now.

Research Presentation: 'Mobile Girls': Geo-Social Media and a New Generation of Women Expats

Thursday, April 21, 3:45-5 p.m.—Boettcher Auditorium, room 101
The Department of Geography and the Environment Colloquium series presents a lecture by Dr. Erika Polson, Department of Film, Media, and Journalism Studies at DU. As corporations ramp up "workforce globalization" and young professionals increasingly pursue opportunities to work abroad, social entrepreneurs use online digital platforms to create offline social events where foreigners can meet face-to-face. Polson's talk draws from ethnographic research of expats and geo-social media in Paris, Singapore, and Bangalore to critically reflect on how women's mobility is aided by these innovations. This work makes up part of Polson's forthcoming book, Privileged Mobilities: Professional Migration, Geo-Social Media, and a New Global Middle Class.

In the Next Room, (or The Vibrator Play), staged reading

Friday, April 22—Byron Theatre
Set in the 1880s and based on the bizarre historical fact that doctors used vibrators to treat 'hysterical' women, the play (written by Sarah Ruhl) centers on a doctor and his wife and how his new therapy affects their entire household. Admission is free

Bang for your buck: Investing wisely in brain health

Monday, April 25, 7-9 p.m.
In 2014, U.S. health care revenues topped $1 trillion. One product alone, boasting a boost in brain power, accounted for nearly $30 million. Some interventions bear strong scien¬tific support; others offer little benefit. Still others may be harmful. Clinical Associate Professor of Psychophysiology and Neuropsychology Kim Gorgens helps you separate the snake oil from the sound science in an update of her popular Care and Feeding of Brains lecture. Faculty and staff use code EPZONEW16 to save 20 percent on registration.

Money Smart Week

April 26-28
Money Smart Week is a national initiative of the Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago and the American Library Association. DU's University Libraries has partnered with Daniels College of Business, DU Bursar's Office, and US Bank to bring free financial literacy presentations and workshops to campus the week of April 25. More information

CEUCE and WorldDenver Present: An EU Day Celebration with The Konection Trio

Thursday, April 28, 6-9 p.m. - Sie Complex room 5025
The Konection Trio will play a mix of their own compositions and well-known Jazz standards arranged in a fresh and contemporary framework. The evening will include registration from 6-6:30, a program from 6:30-7:30 in which the band will perform as well as talk about multiculturalism, integration in the EU and music as a language. The Konection Trio will also reflect on possibilities using music as a tool to facilitate the integration of immigrants/refugees into their communities. The program will be followed by a Q&A session and a reception with appetizers, beer and wine. Tickets are $10, RSVP required.

CCUSC Sabel Awards dinner and presentations

(Register by April 27) Wednesday, May 4, 4:30-9 p.m.—Sie Complex, fifth floor event room
We hope you will join the Center for China—U.S. Cooperation (CCUSC) for a dinner event to celebrate the Inaugural Annual John and Vivian Sabel Award of the best article in The Journal of Contempora China. This event is open to the public. Register

"Afro-Medieval Literature?" a Symposium on Temporality

Friday, April 29, 2:30-4:30 p.m.—Sturm Hall, room 451
Periodization is the organizing principle for English, History, Art History, and other humanities-related disciplines. It structures undergraduate and graduate curricula, faculty hires and professional conversations within and across these disciplines. And yet, it is fraught with problems, among them, the temporality of "ethnic literatures." Join Assistant Professor Cord Whitaker (Wellesley College), alongside DU professors Davor Balzar (physics), Hillary Hamann (geography), and Esteban Gomez (anthropology), in a discussion on the relationship between temporality and academic disciplinarily. This event is generously sponsored by the Department of English, the AHSS Dean's Office, the Office of Graduate Studies, and the Center for Multicultural Excellence.

DU StoryCorps: Making connections through storytelling

(Story submissions due April 27) Tuesday, May 19, 4:30-6:30 p.m.—Margery Reed Hall, Reiman Theater
Join the DU Leadership Academy in launching the inaugural storytelling event for students, faculty and staff. Prepare a five-minute true story about the time you were a "Fish Out of Water." ...a time when you felt totally out of your element, whether you felt like an outsider, you were a foreigner traveling in a new country, a rookie on the new job, or in some other unfamiliar and uncomfortable situation. Submit your story pitch no later than midnight on April 27th. 8 storytellers will be selected from story submissions to share their story on Tuesday, May 10th. For more information, email carolyn.sommers@du.edu. To attend the event, RSVP is requested, though not required. Free and open to all.

Chaplain's book discussion: Shared Stories, Rival Tellings by Robert Gregg

Wednesday, May 4, noon—Driscoll North, Commerce Room
Shared Stories, Rival Tellings explores the early exchanges of Jews, Christians, and Muslims, and argues that their interactions were dominated by debates over the meanings of certain stories sacred to all three communities. Robert C. Gregg shows how Jewish, Christian, and Muslim interpreters--artists as well as authors--developed their unique and particular understandings of narratives present in the two Bibles and the Qur'an. As he guides us through the often intentional variations introduced into these shared stories, Gregg exposes major issues under contention and the social-intellectual forces that contributed to spirited, and sometimes combative, exchanges among Jews, Christians, and Muslims. Prof. Andrea Stanton of Religious Studies will co-facilitate. Copies of the chapters and more information

Animals on the Mind: Social Neurobiology of the Human-Animal Bond in Research and Practice

May 12-13—Davis Auditorium
The Institute for Human-Animal Connection (IHAC) at Graduate School of Social Work is pleased to announce our 2nd Biennial Practitioners Conference, Animals on the Mind, exploring the social neurobiology of human-animal interactions in research and practice. This conference will center on the applications and research of animal-assisted interventions specific to social neuroscience in areas such as: Autism Spectrum Disorders, mental health treatment and variants of exposure to animals across the lifespan. Keynote speakers include Temple Grandin, Richard Louv and Aubrey Fine. Registration is free for DU students, faculty and staff. Learn more and register.

The "Liberal" International Order: any room for an illiberal rising power like China?

Tuesday, April 12, 5:15pm-6:30 p.m.—Ben Cherrington Hall, room SIE 1150
The Center for China – US Cooperation presents is pleased to host Dr. Shiping Tang, Fudan University Distinguished Professor and Fulbright visiting research scholar at the School of Global Policy and Strategy (GPS), University of California at San Diego for 2015-16 academic year. Register and get more information

10th Annual University Libraries author's lecture: How to Bake Pi: An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics

Wednesday, April 13, 1 p.m.—AAC Special Events Room (290)
Eugenia Cheng is senior lecturer of pure mathematics at the University of Sheffield and is currently on sabbatical as scientist in residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her YouTube lectures, beginning in 2007, have been viewed over a million times. Cheng's ambition is to rid the world of "math phobia." She brings personality, fun and hilarity to math. At the University of Sheffield, she is known for her wacky math lectures. She likes baking, and uses food to explain math whenever possible. For more information or to RSVP by phone, call 303-871-3016. Register

Senior Capstone Festival, Cycle 1

April 13-17–JMAC Studios
Seniors direct a one-act play using the theatrical skills, techniques, perspectives and styles learned from the Theatre program. Cycle 1 titles include: Hippie Van Gumdrop, I'm Not Stupid, and Porcelain and Pink. All tickets are $10.

Marsico Visiting Scholar presentation: "Rethinking No-Man's Land: From Dead Zones to Living Spaces"

Thursday, April 14, 3:45-5 p.m.—Boettcher Auditorium, room 101
The Department of History and the Department of Geography and the Environment present a Marsico Visiting Scholar lecture by Dr. Noam Leshem, Department of Geography, Durham University (UK). Dr. Leshem's colloquium will provide some insights into the intellectual history of no-man's lands and explores their significance for political and social research. Examples of no-man's lands include: disputed territories between fiefdoms, First World War trenches between the British and Germans, demilitarized zones, unclaimed border regions, the 30km exclusion zone around Chernobyl, evacuated mining towns in Australia, or military sites in North America. Drawing on broad international research, the paper proposes a conceptual framework that addresses the specific genealogies, agendas and intellectual import of no-man's lands in the 21st century.

Our Culture is Our Resistance: Repression, Refuge and Healing in Guatemala

Thursday, April 14, 5-7 p.m. (exhibit opening reception)—Museum of Anthropology, Sturm Hall 102
Jonathan Moller is a fine art/documentary photographer and human rights activist. This exhibit documents his work with the indigenous peoples of Guatemala uprooted by the country's long and brutal civil war—exposing the truth of what happened. These images are stories of life and death, of hope and despair, and of struggles for survival, justice, and truth. There will be a gallery talk with local activist Juan de Dios at 6 p.m. Presented in English with Spanish translations. The exhibit will run April 4 thru May 27. Free and open to the public.

Celebrate National Student Employment Week!

Friday, April 15, 1-3 p.m.—Driscoll Bridge
We hope you can join us this Friday on the Driscoll Bridge for free lemonade and cookies! We will also be passing out some great DU student employment water bottles. As we will be celebrating all student employees and supervisors, this event is open to all of the DU community. All goodies are first come, first served – so please encourage all of your student employees to stop by early. Thank you for your continued support of DU's student employees!

Animals on the Mind: Social Neurobiology of the Human-Animal Bond in Research and Practice

May 12-13—Davis Auditorium (register by Friday, April 15)
The Institute for Human-Animal Connection (IHAC) at Graduate School of Social Work is pleased to announce our 2nd Biennial Practitioners Conference, Animals on the Mind, exploring the social neurobiology of human-animal interactions in research and practice. This conference will center on the applications and research of animal-assisted interventions specific to social neuroscience in areas such as: Autism Spectrum Disorders, mental health treatment and variants of exposure to animals across the lifespan. Keynote speakers include Temple Grandin, Richard Louv and Aubrey Fine. Registration is free for DU students, faculty and staff. Learn more and register.

100 Years of Natural Wonder: History of the National Park Service

Monday, April 18, 7–9 p.m.
Celebrate the 100-year history of the National Park Service with Professor Richard F. Fleck, who will discuss his own experiences at Rocky Mountain National Park as a seasonal ranger and hiking guide, as well as a hiker in other national parks. Learn how conservation¬ists, political figures and magazine editors all played an important part in the creation of the National Park Service and preservation of the parks themselves. Faculty and staff use code EPZONEW16 to save 20 percent on registration.

Taiwan's 2016 elections and the implications for China-Taiwan relations

Wednesday, April 20, 5:15-6:30 p.m.—new SIE COMPLEX, 1st floor forum
The Center for China – US Cooperation presents is pleased to host Dr. Richard Bush, Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution and Director of its Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies, and the Chen-Fu and Cecilia Yen Koo Chair in Taiwan Studies. Learn more and register

Sturm College of Law and the Center for Professional Development present DU Marijuana Summit

Wednesday, April 20, noon-5:30 p.m.
The University of Denver Sturm College of Law and the Center for Professional Development are proud to present the DU Marijuana Summit. Featuring speakers representing Denver Law, Daniels College of Business and the state of the science in psychology and biology, attendees can choose two of four workshops on hot topics in the law, business, psychology and biology fields. Discussions and workshops will focus on marijuana, the research behind it and the effects of legalization. Students, alumni, staff, faculty and members of the community are welcome to attend. Visit the site for information on pricing, speakers and to register.

OTL (h)appy hour)

Thursday, April 21, 3:30-4:30 p.m.—OTL Conference Room (AAC 345)
During this (h)Appy Hour we will explore and brainstorm new ways for using Powtoon (an online animated presentation/video program), and Picmonkey (a web-based photo editing tool). Come as you are and enjoy a truly informal celebration and exploration of ideas. For additional information view the full OTL blog post or register now!

Bang for your buck: Investing wisely in brain health

Monday, April 25, 7-9 p.m.
In 2014, U.S. health care revenues topped $1 trillion. One product alone, boasting a boost in brain power, accounted for nearly $30 million. Some interventions bear strong scien¬tific support; others offer little benefit. Still others may be harmful. Clinical Associate Professor of Psychophysiology and Neuropsychology Kim Gorgens helps you separate the snake oil from the sound science in an update of her popular Care and Feeding of Brains lecture. Faculty and staff use code EPZONEW16 to save 20% on registration.

CCUSC Sabel Awards dinner and presentations

(Register by April 27) Wednesday, May 4, 4:30-9 p.m.—Sie Complex, fifth floor event room
We hope you will join the Center for China—US Cooperation (CCUSC) for a dinner event to celebrate the Inaugural Annual John and Vivian Sabel Award of the best article in The Journal of Contempora China. This event is open to the public. Register

"Afro-Medieval Literature?" a Symposium on Temporality

Friday, April 29, 2:30-4:30 p.m.—Sturm Hall room 451
Periodization is the organizing principle for English, History, Art History, and other humanities-related disciplines. It structures undergraduate and graduate curricula, faculty hires, and professional conversations within and across these disciplines. And yet, it is fraught with problems, among them, the temporality of "ethnic literatures." Join Assistant Professor, Cord Whitaker (Wellesley College), alongside DU professors Davor Balzar (physics), Hillary Hamann (geography), and Esteban Gomez (anthropology), in a discussion on the relationship between temporality and Academic disciplinarily. Prof. Whitaker will open the symposium with a short keynote that sketches out the problem of periodization and its relationship to race and ethnicity. Then faculty from other disciplines will talk briefly about how time (and space) function in their fields. After a break for food and drink, Prof. Whitaker will moderate a conversation among attendees on how non-humanities disciplines might offer models or strategies that enable humanities departments to re-think how we might imagine and structure knowledge. This event is generously sponsored by the Department of English, the AHSS Dean's Office, the Office of Graduate Studies, and Center for Multicultural Excellence.

More Than Words: Overcoming Language Barriers with Older Adults

Wednesday, April 6, 8:30-10 a.m.—Craig Hall, Boettcher Foundation Community Room
Panel discussion sponsored by GSSW's PROGRESS gerontology program. Breakfast and networking from 8:30-9 a.m., discussion from 9-10 a.m. The event is free and open to the public, but prior registration is required.

AHSS Faculty Lecture: "The HeA/R/T Projects: Using Art, Research and Teaching to Empower Families and Educate Communities About Baby Loss"

Thursday, April 7, 4 p.m. reception, 4:30 p.m. lecture—AAC Special Events Room (290)
Learn about community-based research and service-learning projects that use creative means to understand and heal those experiencing miscarriage, stillbirth and early infant death. Hear from Erin Willer, associate professor of communication studies, about The Scraps of the Heart Project, a collective of parents, health care providers and researchers working together to help families grieve and educate about baby loss through scrapbooking. She'll also share her work with Drawings from the Heart, a program that uses art as a means of coping for children who have experienced the death of a baby. Register

#SleepRevolution is coming to DU

Friday, April 8, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.—Driscoll Green
The Health and Counseling Center, in collaboration with The Huffington Post, will put on a sleep fair on Driscoll Green. It will be a chance to recharge and relax with healthy snacks, pajamas, meditation tools, and mind-blowing sleep gadgets from leading tech entrepreneurs. There will also be a presentation by Arianna Huffington from 11-11:30 a.m.

2016 J. Fagg Foster Awards Ceremony

Friday, April 8, 3 p.m.—Sturm 286
The Department of Economics presents the 2016 J. Fagg Foster Awards Ceremony featuring guest speaker, Professor Stephanie Seguino, University of Vermont. Seguino will be presenting, "Can macroeconomists afford to ignore race and gender stratification."

Early Women Artists of Colorado symposium

Saturday, April 9, 9:30 a.m.-noon—Shwayder Art Building
The symposium features student researchers and curators of "Pushing Boundaries: Early Women Artists of Colorado." Using slide presentations and discussion, faculty and students will explain the collaboration between Kirkland Museum and DU, more about the art and artists, and their own experiences researching and curating women artists of Colorado. Free for DU ART contributors and all students. The exhibition will be on view during registration and from noon-5 p.m. in the Vicki Myhren Gallery.

unraveling the facts and fictions of the zika virus

Tuesday, April 12, noon—BMC 301
Sandy Johnson, PhD, will be facilitating a discussion about the facts and fiction surrounding the reemergence of the Zika virus.

chaplain's "book" discussion on trigger warnings

Tuesday, April 12, noon—Driscoll North, Commerce Room
Join Chaplain Gary Brower and Thomas Walker from the Center for Multicultural Excellence for a discussion on triggers and related warnings–NOT as a debate on any policy, but to acknowledge and engage the emotional, inclusion and freedom impacts on our campus community. We want to increase understanding, not settle the question. This will not be a "book" discussion, but will refer to a variety of readings/podcasts. Bring your lunch and engage in this important discussion!

www.wnyc.org/story/trigger-warnings-spark-debate-over-free-speech/

www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/09/the-coddling-of-the-american-mind/399356/ or https://youtu.be/Dj5QmZPzvlQ

http://diverseeducation.com/article/63360

www.nytimes.com/2015/09/20/opinion/sunday/why-i-use-trigger-warnings.html

http://drkathyobear.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/04/navigating-triggering-events.pdf 

Ethical Leadership in American Business—A Dialogue

Tuesday, April 12, 6-7:30 p.m.—Margery Reed Hall, Reiman Theater
What do leaders of some of America's largest and most successful corporations think about this "integrity challenge?" What is their opinion about the ethical standards and behavior in corporate America today? Plan to attend Elevate Ethics 2016 and learn what three senior executives from three diverse industries and backgrounds have to say about ethical leadership in today's business world. Panelists include Robert Swieringa, Deborah DeHaas and Gary Burandt. Register

10th Annual University Libraries author's lecture: How to Bake Pi: An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics

Wednesday, April 13, 1 p.m.—AAC Special Events Room (290)
Eugenia Cheng is senior lecturer of pure mathematics at the University of Sheffield and is currently on sabbatical as scientist in residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her YouTube lectures, beginning in 2007, have been viewed over a million times. Cheng's ambition is to rid the world of "math phobia." She brings personality, fun and hilarity to math. At the University of Sheffield, she is known for her wacky math lectures. She likes baking, and uses food to explain math whenever possible. For more information or to RSVP by phone, call 303-871-3016. Register

Our Culture is Our Resistance: Repression, Refuge and Healing in Guatemala

Thursday, April 14, 5-7 p.m. (exhibit opening reception)—Museum of Anthropology, Sturm Hall 102
Jonathan Moller is a fine art/documentary photographer and human rights activist. This exhibit documents his work with the indigenous peoples of Guatemala uprooted by the country's long and brutal civil war—exposing the truth of what happened. These images are stories of life and death, of hope and despair, and of struggles for survival, justice, and truth. There will be a gallery talk with local activist Juan de Dios at 6 p.m. Presented in English with Spanish translations. The exhibit will run April 4 thru May 27. Free and open to the public.

Animals on the Mind: Social Neurobiology of the Human-Animal Bond in Research and Practice

May 12-13—Davis Auditorium (register by Friday, April 15)
The Institute for Human-Animal Connection (IHAC) at Graduate School of Social Work is pleased to announce our 2nd Biennial Practitioners Conference, Animals on the Mind, exploring the social neurobiology of human-animal interactions in research and practice. This conference will center on the applications and research of animal-assisted interventions specific to social neuroscience in areas such as: Autism Spectrum Disorders, mental health treatment and variants of exposure to animals across the lifespan. Keynote speakers include Temple Grandin, Richard Louv and Aubrey Fine. Registration is free for DU students, faculty and staff. Learn more and register.

100 Years of Natural Wonder: History of the National Park Service

Monday, April 18, 7–9 p.m.
Celebrate the 100-year history of the National Park Service with Professor Richard F. Fleck, who will discuss his own experiences at Rocky Mountain National Park as a seasonal ranger and hiking guide, as well as a hiker in other national parks. Learn how conservation¬ists, political figures and magazine editors all played an important part in the creation of the National Park Service and preservation of the parks themselves. Faculty and staff use code EPZONEW16 to save 20 percent on registration.

Sturm College of Law and the Center for Professional Development present DU Marijuana Summit

Wednesday, April 20, noon-5:30 p.m.
The University of Denver Sturm College of Law and the Center for Professional Development are proud to present the DU Marijuana Summit. Featuring speakers representing Denver Law, Daniels College of Business and the state of the science in psychology and biology, attendees can choose two of four workshops on hot topics in the law, business, psychology and biology fields. Discussions and workshops will focus on marijuana, the research behind it and the effects of legalization. Students, alumni, staff, faculty and members of the community are welcome to attend. Visit the site for information on pricing, speakers and to register.

Book Art: One Theme, Three Interpretations

Wednesday, March 30, 5:30-8:00 p.m.—AAC Special Events Room (290)
"Book Art: One Theme, Three Interpretations" features open book presentations from Lang Ingalls, Sammy Lee and Gail Watson—three artists from the Rocky Mountain region with varied concentrations and practices in the book arts. Alicia Bailey, studio artist, curator and owner/director at Abecedarian Gallery, will introduce the presenters and moderate the discussion. Each artist will discuss one artwork in detail exploring the materials, methods and meanings involved and revealing their creative process along the way. These diverse presentations review a variety of book arts approaches that are also visible in the 43 works on display in Vessel: The Guild of Book Workers 2015-2017 Exhibition concurrently on view at the University of Denver Libraries. Come early to view Vessel and enjoy an informal reception with appetizers and beverages beginning at 5:30 p.m. This program is free and open to the public, but seating is limited. Reserve your seat online or call 303-871-3074.

Latino Psychology's Spring Junta—"Noche de Chile"

Thursday, March 31, 5-7 p.m.—Craig Hall, Community Room
Please join the Graduate School of Professional Psychology for an evening of updates from the Latino Psychology Specialty. Director Melanie Heto and seven students traveled to Santiago and Concepcion, Chile, in December, where they partnered with Universidad del Desarrollo to participate in clinical activities, patient interviews and psychiatry rounds. They also visited area jails, mental health clinics, hospitals and residential treatment programs. We'll screen a video the students made about their travels and enjoy authentic catering by Adelitas Cocina y Cantina. Free of charge. Registration

2016 Symposium on Prisoner Justice: Reimagining Punishment in America

Friday, April 1, 8:30 a.m.-7 p.m.—Sturm Hall
Saturday, April 2, 8:30 a.m.-5 p.m.—Sie Complex 1150
Please join the Prisoners' Justice League of Colorado, LLC, the National Academy of Prisoner Rights Lawyers, and the Center on Rights Development to learn about and become involved in the discussion of society's treatment of persons convicted of crime. The 2016 Symposium on Prisoner Justice is open to the public and will offer more than a dozen sessions addressing such topics as the state of criminal punishment in America today, prison profiteering, obstacles to ex-offenders' successful re-entry, and a workshop on anti-violence. Symposium speakers include some of the country's leading voices and experts. Information and free registration

UNIVERSITY LICENSED STARTUP SUCCESS

Friday, April 1, 10-11:30 a.m.—Margery Reed Hall, room 201
Project X-ITE and the Office of Entrepreneurship invite faculty and staff to the first colloquium of the 2016 academic year, featuring Paul C. Godfrey of Brigham Young University, who will present his work on University Licensed Startup firm success. Register

AHSS Distinguished Speaker Series presents Winona LaDuke

Tuesday, April 5, 5:30 p.m. reception, 7 p.m. lecture—Davis Auditorium (room 248)
In a country founded on religious freedom, Native religious freedom remains an unresolved problem in America. At her lecture entitled "Creating a Multicultural Democracy: Religion, Culture and Identity in America," LaDuke will argue that there is a need for a new paradigm in America's legal, legislative and regulatory policy realms. Sacred sites and the reaffirmation of Native religions are the basis of Native religious freedom, yet the U.S. legislature threatens that freedom even in the new millennium. For instance, sacred Apache land in Arizona was recently re-appropriated to a mining company. By citing emergent international regulations and case studies, LaDuke will address broader questions of public policy to make the case that the U.S. needs to reevaluate the rights of nature versus the rights of corporations. Register

DOCUMENTARY SCREENING: PROGRAMMING HOPE, GAME DESIGNERS. GAME CHANGERS. rescheduled

Tuesday, April 5, 6-8 p.m.—Morgridge College of Education (1999 E. Evans Ave.)
Join DSST Public Schools and the University of Denver for a screening of Programming Hope. The film will be followed by a conversation about how computer science can support and provide post-secondary opportunities for individuals with autism and cognitive disabilities. Please RSVP

2016 Spring Symposium: Beyond the Battlefield: the Intersection of Gender and Conflict

Tuesday, April 5-Friday, April 8—Sie Complex, 5th floor event space
The Center on Rights Development is happy to announce its 17th annual symposium, Beyond the Battlefield: The Intersection of Gender and Conflict. The Center on Rights Development is a non-profit, academic center affiliated with the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. For the past 27 years, the center has sought to promote the universal recognition of human rights by cultivating a deeper understanding of the issues surrounding economic, social and cultural rights through events and advocacy, with global and local partnerships. Our conversations will be centered around the following discussions: gendered recruitment into armed forces, women as agents (military, militia, terrorism and civil resistance), gendered violence, the vulnerabilities of forced migration, and countering expectations. The symposium will include panel discussions in the evenings and a combination of other speaking engagements throughout the day. Register and view the full schedule of events

More Than Words: Overcoming Language Barriers with Older Adults

Wednesday, April 6, 8:30-10 a.m.—Craig Hall, Boettcher Foundation Community Room
Panel discussion sponsored by GSSW's PROGRESS gerontology program. Breakfast and networking from 8:30-9 a.m., discussion from 9-10 a.m. The event is free and open to the public, but prior registration is required.

UNIVERSITY LECTURE FEATURING JEANNE ABRAMS-REVOLUTIONARY MEDICINE: AMERICA'S FOUNDERS IN SICKNESS AND HEALTH

Thursday, April 7, 5 p.m.—Cable Center-The Center Theater
This lecture will examine the health and illnesses of George and Martha Washington, Benjamin Franklin, John and Abigail Adams, and Thomas Jefferson against the backdrop of 18th-century American medicine. These founders were all highly knowledgeable about medicine and as national leaders occupied an influential position regarding the development of public health in the new republic. They recognized early on that government had compelling reasons to shoulder some new responsibilities to ensure the health and well-being of its citizenry. Space is limited; please RSVP

AHSS Faculty Lecture: "The HeA/R/T Projects: Using Art, Research and Teaching to Empower Families and Educate Communities About Baby Loss"

Thursday, April 7, 4 p.m. reception, 4:30 p.m. lecture—AAC Special Events Room (290)
Learn about community-based research and service-learning projects that use creative means to understand and heal those experiencing miscarriage, stillbirth and early infant death. Hear from Erin Willer, associate professor of communication studies, about The Scraps of the Heart Project, a collective of parents, health care providers and researchers working together to help families grieve and educate about baby loss through scrapbooking. She'll also share her work with Drawings from the Heart, a program that uses art as a means of coping for children who have experienced the death of a baby. Register

#SleepRevolution is coming to DU

Friday, April 8, 10 a.m.-2 p.m.—Driscoll Green
The Health and Counseling Center, in collaboration with The Huffington Post, will put on a sleep fair on Driscoll Green. It's part of the #SleepRevolution College Tour outreach for Arianna Huffington's new book, The Sleep Revolution. The book explores the dangers of sleep deprivation and the importance of sleep for overall health and wellness. The event will be a chance to recharge and relax with healthy snacks, pajamas, meditation tools, and mind-blowing sleep gadgets from leading tech entrepreneurs. There will also be a presentation by Arianna Huffington from 11-11:30 a.m.

ETHICAL LEADERSHIP IN AMERICAN BUSINESS—A DIALOGUE

Tuesday, April 12, 6-7:30 p.m.—Margery Reed Hall, Reiman Theater
What do leaders of some of America's largest and most successful corporations think about this "integrity challenge?" What is their opinion about the ethical standards and behavior in corporate America today? Plan to attend Elevate Ethics 2016 and learn what three senior executives from three diverse industries and backgrounds have to say about ethical leadership in today's business world. Panelists include Robert Swieringa, Deborah DeHaas and Gary Burandt. Register

10th Annual University Libraries author's lecture: How to Bake Pi: An Edible Exploration of the Mathematics of Mathematics

Wednesday, April 13, 1 p.m.—AAC Special Events Room (290)
Eugenia Cheng is senior lecturer of pure mathematics at the University of Sheffield and is currently on sabbatical as scientist in residence at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Her YouTube lectures, beginning in 2007, have been viewed over a million times. Cheng's ambition is to rid the world of "math phobia." She brings personality, fun and hilarity to math. At the University of Sheffield, she is known for her wacky math lectures. She likes baking, and uses food to explain math whenever possible. For more information or to RSVP by phone, call 303-871-3016. Register

Sturm College of Law and the Center for Professional Development present DU Marijuana Summit

Wednesday, April 20, noon-5:30 p.m.
The University of Denver Sturm College of Law and the Center for Professional Development are proud to present the DU Marijuana Summit. Featuring speakers representing Denver Law, Daniels College of Business and the state of the science in psychology and biology, attendees can choose two of four workshops on hot topics in the law, business, psychology and biology fields. Discussions and workshops will focus on marijuana, the research behind it and the effects of legalization. Students, alumni, staff, faculty and members of the community are welcome to attend. Visit the site for information on pricing, speakers and to register.

Pushing Boundaries: Early Women Artists of Colorado exhibit

Opening reception Thursday, March 24, 5-7 p.m.—Vicki Myhren Gallery
Please join us for an opening reception celebrating Pushing Boundaries. This exhibition explores the lives and artwork of 18 Colorado artists from the late 1800s to early 1900s. Students at the University of Denver's School of Art and Art History planned and presented this exhibit with featured artwork on long-term loan from the Kirkland Museum of Fine Decorative Art. Enjoy light refreshments co-hosted by the Kirkland Museum. This event is free and open to the public. The exhibit runs through May 1. 

VESSEL: A GUILD OF BOOK WORKERS EXHIBITION

Feb. 18-April 12—AAC main and upper levels
Vessel, the Guild of Book Workers triennial members' exhibition, features 43 works from book artists and craftspeople from across the country. Inspired by the theme, participants interpret "vessel" in diverse ways and create some of the finest examples of book arts today. The University of Denver Libraries is one of six venues showcasing these works, which tour the U.S. from October 2015 through March 2017. Information on associated events and programs available on the AAC Exhibits website. Read more about the exhibition and the Guild of Book Workers at the GBW website.

Brain Rounds: New monthly lecture series from the Center for Professional Development

Starting Wednesday, Jan. 13, 12-1 p.m., Ruffatto Hall
Thought leaders in neurology, psychology, biology, neuroscience and more will be delivering interdisciplinary lectures in this monthly series called Brain Rounds. Events are free and open to the public. For psychologists attending, DU’s Graduate School of Professional Psychology is offering continuing education credit for $20. For registration and questions, please contact cpd@du.edu or 303-871-4161.