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Graduate School of Professional Psychology
PsyD Requirements

PsyD Courses

Required PsyD Courses (2014-15)

Intro to Statistics

General statistical principles and techniques and their application to psychological and psycho-legal issues. Students will develop computer analytic skills to assist in answering professionally relevant questions.

Radical Behaviorism/Functional Contextualism Models

CPSY 5000 is designed to provide a historical, philosophical and conceptual background to better understand and appreciate Behaviorist views of "being-in-the world". The course lays the foundation for the sophisticated application of a science of behaviorist theories and methods to the assessment of clinical problems and the art of doing psychotherapy. The course will invite a little discomfort, disturb some preconceptions, and compel students to address some difficult questions and thorny issues. Among the goals of this course are to see students commit to being more than a psychologist technician; to encourage them to develop a guiding philosophical core in their practice as a psychologist; to assist them in clarifying or deepening of whatever philosophical worldview they may hold; and achieve an informed understanding of radical behaviorism/functional contextualism - whether or not they choose to further pursue these models.

Cognitive & Affective Models

This is the first in a three part sequence that includes Psychophysiology and Clinical Neuropsychology and is designed to introduce students to the current research in cognitive neuroscience and consciousness. This first course focuses on sensation/perception, learning, memory, emotion, language and other higher cognitive functions. Lectures will emphasize current technologies and historical inquiry and the unique contributions made by psychosocial and cultural variables.

Psychoanalytic Models

Psychoanalytic theories, including Freud's topographic and structural theories, ego psychology, object relations theory and modern relational theories, including self-psychology and intersubjectivity.

Systems Models

Basic concepts of general systems theory and its applications in psychology, focusing on family systems, groups and organizations.

History and Systems in Psychology

Basic psychological concepts surveyed from a historical point of view, tracing the development of psychological bases of professional practice.

Advanced Statistics

This course is designed to increase your understanding of advanced analytical techniques in statistics, particularly as they pertain to psychology. We will take an applied approach, i.e., the course material will emphasize the feasibility, application, and utilization of these analyses rather than the theories upon which they are based.

Research Methods

Sequential course that cover fundamentals of structuring, analyzing and critiquing research reports and proposals; strategies to guide and facilitate the writing process; attitude and thinking skills necessary for function as a local clinical scientist; research design tools, methods and strategies for answering different types of questions.

Qualitative Research Methods

Qualitative research involves obtaining in-depth information about the behaviors and beliefs of people in naturally occurring social settings. This course introduces students to the philosophical underpinnings, history, and key elements of five qualitative approaches: narrative research, phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, and case study. We compare theoretical frameworks and methodologies, experience the use of data, and discuss writing strategies. In addition, we read articles that are exemplars of each approach.

Program Evaluation Technique

This course explores theory and techniques for developing management information and assessment systems for human service programs.

Diagnosis and Classification

This course focuses on psychopathology in terms of DSM-IV system of diagnosis and classification; process of deriving a complete 5-axis diagnosis.

Issues in Measurement

Validity, reliability and standardization issues in psychological testing; statistical properties of commonly used tests.

Life Cycle: Infancy to Mid Childhood

Understanding normal development of children (0-12 years), integrating theory, research and a phenomenological perspective.

Life Cycle: Adolescent - Adult

Understanding normal adolescent development (13-18 years), integrating theory, research and a phenomenological perspective. Major theories, life events, crisis and the adult life phases. There will be an emphasis on the diversity of adult experiences.

Life Cycle: Late Adulthood

Theories of aging; social, psychological and biological changes; assessment and intervention methods, emphasizing issues impacting older adults. (65 years and above).

Group Dynamics & Interventions

Provides psychologists-in-training with multiple learning experiences focusing on groups and organizations as intensely psychological environments. Highlights how psychologists function professionally and personally and have the potential for positive impact.

Social Psychology

This course explores how social psychologists approach psychology, concentrating on key concepts, research findings, and critical thinking strategies that students can integrate into their own clinical work.

Physiological Psychology I

Terminology and principles of and research in physiological psychology. Where possible, application made to content and practice of clinical psychology.

Clinical Neuropsychology

Historical, conceptual and clinical foundations for, as well as current developments related to, the field of clinical neuropsychology. Includes exposure to: developmental neuropsychology and neuroanatomy; higher cognitive functions; neuropsychologically informed interviews and standard neuropsychological test batteries; neuropsychological profiles associated with a variety of acquired disorders (both neuropsychological and psychological in nature); ethnic, cultural, age and gender considerations; and current status of a variety of professional/ethical issues. Prerequisites: CPSY 5270

Ethical Issues in Psychology

In-depth consideration of ethical standards applicable to the science and practice of psychology; pertinent laws and legal standards governing the practice of psychology; areas in which legal and ethical standards suggests contradictory actions on the part of the clinical psychologist.

Professional Issues in Psychology

Issues, concerns and controversies impacting the current practice of professional psychology at the state and national levels; preparation for future alternative systems of service delivery. Emphasis is on professional life after the PsyD. Required for first year students.

Social Psychology of Racism and Oppression

Theoretical and experimental nature of racism and oppression, primarily in the United States, definition of such terms as stereotypes, prejudice. racism, white supremacy and privilege; exploration of various theories regarding these terms and how they manifest themselves historically and contemporarily.

Racial & Ethnic Identity Development

This course will explicate the concept of ethnic identification, and the process by which this central aspect of a person's overall identity develops. Accordingly, this course will address two central questions: who are they? and how did they get that way? These questions will be examined utilizing a Descriptive Psychology perspective.

Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual & Transgender Issues

Various aspects of gay, lesbian life explored cross- culturally; nature of homosexuality, including the controversy of heredity vs. choice. Issues of oppression and discrimination will also be explored. The role of psychology and the politics of homosexuality will be studied. Students will also be asked to explore their personal awareness regarding homosexuality in their everyday lives and in a therapeutic context.

Culturally Competent Psychotherapy

As the final class in the year-long multicultural course sequence, this class will integrate the theoretical content of the preceding classes and focus on their psychotherapeutic implications. This course will address psychotherapy with the following groups - African Americans, Asian Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, and the GLBT community.

Pro Sem: Beginning Psychotherapy

The beginning seminar is designed to introduce students to the practice of psychotherapy. Students will explore basic theories and techniques of counseling, with an emphasis on the therapy relationship. Students will examine the development of the therapeutic alliance, the process of setting goals in treatment, and the establishment of a therapy contract. In addition, students will explore ethical and legal issues in the therapy process. Finally, students will also look at issues of professionalism and self care. A combination of readings, case presentations, videos, and role plays will be used to cover the material. Students are expected to carry two cases through the PPC in conjunction with the seminar.

Pro Sem: Child & Adolescent Psychotherapy

In this seminar we will take an Integrative Approach to the treatment of children, adolescents and families. While various integrative approaches will be considered, Cyclical Psychodynamics (Wachtel) will be one example that is thoroughly covered. This approach conceptualizes functioning through the integration of individual developmental dynamics and systemic factors. Interventions occur through a combination of individual child/adolescent, parent and parent-child/adolescent sessions. The developmental details of working with children at various ages will be a focus, from play techniques with young children to the developmental dynamics of working with adolescents. Understanding interpersonal and intrapersonal dynamics as influenced by attachment variables, and the ways in which this informs the treatment of children, adolescents and their parents will be discussed as it relates to seminar cases.

In the early weeks of each quarter, we will determine a variety of topics in child and adolescent evaluation and treatment that are of interest to cover. Brief, informal presentations on these topics will be made by students throughout the year and guest speakers of interest may be arranged.

There are no prerequisites for taking this seminar, although it may be useful to you if you have taken the Diagnosis and Treatment of Children/Adolescent courses, or will be in the process of doing so next year.

Pro Sem: Psychological Assessment

This seminar will focus on clinical material related to aspects of psychological assessment. It demands more of a time commitment than most other seminars because assessment requires longer sessions with clients to administer tests, time to score and interpret tests, and report writing. There will be opportunities to complete personality, ADHD, and learning disability assessments, for both children and adults. You are required to complete a minimum of 3 cases during the course of the year (one per quarter). We will not be providing neuropsychological testing services, although we will discuss some neuropsychological issues as they arise. Students will have the chance to present their cases and consult with the seminar. We hope you will find it enriching and fun.

Requirements for enrollment in the seminar include: prior completion of Cognitive Assessment and Self-Report Assessment, as well as completion of or at least concurrent enrollment in the Introduction to Rorschach class. The seminar co-leaders provide supervision and enrich the experience. Supervision of assigned small subgroups typically takes place either before (11:30 to 1) or after (3 to 4:30) seminar or on Fridays (1 to 2:30).

Pro Sem: Behavior Therapy

This advanced professional seminar draws upon pragmatic philosophy and contextualistic worldview as it informs and guides contemporary behavior analytic theory and practice. Seminar students will gain experience using functional analysis as a method for describing and integrating clinical observations and they will learn to implement a variety of evidence based, acceptance inspired interventions designed to facilitate psychological flexibility and values-congruent living in clients from diverse backgrounds. Therapeutic work will be conducted in an atmosphere of care, respect, compassion, and commitment, and will challenge the client (and therapist) to be more open, aware, vulnerable, and present in their lives.

Seminar time will be devoted to case presentations primarily. Some emphasis may be given to experiential exercises as time permits.

Prerequisites: Seminar enrollment requires that students must have completed, or be concurrently enrolled in, the yearlong behavior analysis sequence courses, including Behavior Analysis Principles 1 (fall), Behavior Analysis Principles 2 (winter), Behavioral Case Formulation (spring), and Behavior Therapy Interventions (summer).

Pro Sem: Forensic Issues

This seminar will introduce students to the various areas and ways in which psychology interacts with the legal and criminal justice systems. Students will develop their capacity to perform evaluations relating to psychological questions, dilemmas, and disputes that are most frequently requested of forensic psychologists. Focus of the seminar will be on assisting students in clarifying their role as an evaluator and consultant to attorneys, judges, and criminal justice personnel; exploring the ethical responsibilities therein; learning to compose reports for a legal rather than a clinical audience; and preparing to testify as an expert witness. Students will formulate and deliver case presentations and submit reports.

Students in past seminars have conducted child custody evaluations, mental status at time of offense evaluations, SSDI evaluations, asylum evaluations, and juvenile placement evaluations; these evaluations included objective and projective personality assessments and cognitive assessments. In addition, we have been getting more court mandated therapy clients. Thus, students will get assessment experience as well as individual therapy experience with adults and children. Assessment experience required. If you have not completed all assessment courses, please speak to Lavita.

Pro Sem: Psychodynamic Therapy

This seminar will focus on psychodynamic psychotherapy with adults. We will emphasize the practical application of psychodynamic concepts to work with clients. The seminar will afford the opportunity to deepen our understanding of the unconscious dynamics that influence our clients' experience of the world. We will learn to explore and understand clients' underlying self-experience and the nature of their relating with others.

We will come to appreciate the therapeutic relationship as an experiential data point that facilitates the exploration of transferences and enactments. We will come to understand the therapeutic relationship as vehicle in which we can travel with the client through previously uncharted territory, affording them a developmentally relevant experiential shift. We will also learn to explore and make use of your countertransference reactions to inform case conceptualization and guide interventions.

In this seminar, it will also include a segment on dream work. Participants will learn how we can make sense of dreams (our own and our clients') in the context of our understanding of the dreamer. We will also discuss how dreams can be used in psychotherapy to enhance the exploration of the client's underlying experience.

We will learn through videos, group process, supervision and readings. We will draw from various areas of contemporary psychodynamic thought including relational theory, self-psychology, attachment theory, object relations, and the relevant literature on trauma.

Prior or current personal psychotherapy is highly desirable and strongly recommended. Students should be prepared to discuss their clinical work openly and help foster an environment of mutual trust, compassion and respect which facilitates self-reflection and the meaningful exploration of clinical material.

As you may not have had a chance to meet either of us, we each welcome any questions you may have. Please feel free to call Mac at 720-226-6080 or Will at 303-877-4407.

Pro Sem: Couple and Family

This seminar is designed for students who want to develop a specialty in working with families and couples. Prerequisites include Systems Theory. Couples Therapy and Family Therapy must be taken before or during the seminar. Theoretical perspectives utilized include general systems theory and an integration of behavioral, experiential, and historical family therapy approaches. The seminar will combine case presentations and discussions of special topics such as custody evaluations and sex therapy. Guest speakers are sometimes utilized. Students will be asked to explore and discuss their professional development through the use of their own family genograms. Video tape, live supervision, and role plays will also be employed. Students will be required to carry 2-3 cases throughout the seminar.

Pro Sem: ACT

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) belongs to the movement in clinical psychological science that sees acceptance and openness to experience as an essential addition to change-focused psychotherapeutic treatment strategies. Although consciously based on behavior-analytic thinking, ACT is a hybrid therapy in terms of approach and technique, bringing together aspects of Zen Buddhism, Gestalt therapy, and humanist-existential thought. The paradox upon which ACT is founded is that only radical acceptance of what cannot be changed empowers us to recognize and change the things that we can. The ACT approach is about embracing necessary suffering in order to make more committed, life-affirming choices and live in accordance with personal values. ACT emphasizes that in a very deep sense all human beings are in the same boat. The technical and theoretical bases of ACT are transmitted through normal didactics, but the heart and art of the approach occurs through group process, small group and individual supervision, and from observation and modeling. In the end, the core of ACT training is to create an experience of what it is like to stand in the place that we ask our clients to stand in.

Pro Sem: Cog-Behav Therapy

Cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) uses critical thinking and empiricism to guide behavior that arose from fears, habits, outmoded solutions, and superstitions. CBT depends on a solid working alliance, but the therapeutic relationship is not a reworking of past relationships; instead, it is an educational, collaborative, and goal-directed approach to therapy.

After the first quarter, the seminar will focus on radical CBT, meaning we will emphasize the schemas and patterns that operate in the therapy office. We will also explore the skills applicable to all therapies, including frame management, alliance repair, interpretation, and understanding power dynamics, privilege, identity, gender, and metaphor. Couple's therapy cases are welcome.

Pro Sem: Integrative Therapy

This advanced seminar will examine various integrative models of psychotherapy, and students will have the opportunity to develop their own therapeutic "voice" by integrating the major theories already learned at the GSPP. While the seminar will be theoretical in nature, one goal will be to help students prepare for practice in the real world by exploring the common factors of therapy, and how to work collaboratively in a client-directed fashion. Clients may include adults, adolescents, and children with a wide variety of presenting concerns, in individual, couples, family, or group therapy. Students will be expected to present their work regularly on DVD and (in Dr. Cornish's supervision), occasionally behind the two-way mirror. Competency areas covered will include: professionalism, reflective practice, scientific knowledge and methods, relationships, individual and cultural diversity, ethical/legal standard and policy, assessment, and intervention.

Pro Sem: Health Psych


This advanced seminar will focus on the ways that clients' physical health concerns affect psychosocial and emotional well-being. We will focus on the relationship between the mind and the body and take a holistic and contextual approach to understanding work with clients, keeping in mind relational and cultural variables throughout the seminar. Clients in the PPC that have been in this seminar have had cancer, multiple sclerosis, diabetes, heart failure, chronic pain, autoimmune diseases, etc.

As relevant to our work with clients, we will discuss pain management, mindfulness, differential diagnoses of depression and anxiety, sleep hygiene, psychosocial oncology, grief and loss, and other empirically supported treatments for issues that clients present. The overarching theoretical framework of the course will be relationship-focused, client-centered, and strengths-based. We will draw on rehabilitation psychology and medical psychology, and will explore diversity issues in a variety of ways, including examining disability as a multicultural issue. We will use readings from interpersonal psychotherapy, feminist and multicultural therapy, positive-psychology, meaning-centered psychotherapy, humanistic/existential therapy, client-centered therapy and post-traumatic growth to guide our discussions. Particular attention will be paid to helping clients enhance their strengths and find meaning in their lives during times of transition.

Since many health settings are focused on a short-term model of treatment, students in seminar will have the option of taking on shorter-term cases and we will explore the use of time-limited psychotherapy in a health setting. It will be expected that most students take on new cases in this seminar.

Consultation

This course provides an overview of the practice of psychological consultation. Theories and models of consultation in various settings including businesses, organizations, health care, and schools are covered. The process and stages of consultation from entry to termination are analyzed. This class differentiates consultation from other types of psychological interventions. Important legal, ethical and multicultural issues in consultation are addressed throughout the course. Students develop their own model for conducting consultation and refine that model through work with local organizations. Students increase their awareness of their strengths and weaknesses in the practice of consultation. Methods of instruction include lecture, discussion, experiential exercises, and interactions with local organizations and professional consultants.

Cognitive Assessment

Theoretical, professional and clinical issues involving intelligence and its measurement; assessment of cognitive functioning and clinical interpretation of test results, focusing on the WAIS-III (and child equivalents). prerequisites: CPSY 5130

Introduction to the Rorschach

Exner's Comprehensive System for administering, scoring and developing hypotheses with the Rorschach Test. Prerequisite: CPSY 5130

Self Report Assessment

Construction and application of objective instruments, emphasizing the MMPI and MCMI. Students are required to submit test reposts. Prerequisites: CPSY: 5130

Integrative Personality Assessment

This course is the culmination of the assessment sequence, and integrates techniques, approaches and concepts covered in issues in Measurement, Cognitive Assessment, Objective Personality Assessment, and Rorschach. Aspects of the other core courses in the curriculum will also be brought to bear on the question of how to obtain and how to interpret information within various theoretical models for the purposes of answering referral questions and planning interventions. Projective testing will be introduced as a source of behavior samples for which the occasioning environment is known to the psychologist. There will be focus on distinguishing interpretable from irrelevant information, and on integrating interpretable information into meaningful patterns. The goal of using assessment to answer referral question and plan treatments will generate a special focus on report writing.

Supervision

This course is designed to familiarize students with theories of supervision; provide practical, guided experience in peer supervision/consultation; help students understand and critically discuss the supervisory process; aid in gaining awareness of how multicultural issues may affect supervision; and familiarize students with ethical and legal issues in supervision.


Elective Courses (2014-15)

Career Counseling

This course is designed to teach the theoretical framework of career counseling, and introduce the basic counseling tools used in the career counseling process. The course will present major theories of career development, introduce sources of occupational information, and introduce principles of assessment in career counseling. The impact of diversity and difference on career development and choices, as well as the career counseling process, will also be explored.
Topics will include: the role of interests, skills, values and personality in the career development process; social, cultural, and family influences on the career development process; career development across the lifespan.

Introduction to Acceptance & Commitment Therapy

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) belongs to the movement in clinical psychological science that sees acceptance and openness to experience as an essential additional to change-focused psychotherapeutic treatment strategies. Although consciously based on behavior-analytic thinking, ACT is a hybrid therapy in terms of approach and technique, bringing together aspects of Zen Buddhism, Gestalt therapy, and humanist-existential thought. The paradox upon which ACT is founded is that only radical acceptance of what cannot be changed empowers people to recognize and change the things that they can. The ACT approach is about embracing necessary suffering in order to make more committed, life-affirming choices and live in accordance with personal values. ACT emphasizes that in a very deep sense of human beings are in the same boat. The technical and theoretical bases of ACT are through normal didactics, but the heart and art of the approach occurs through experiential exercises, group process, and from observation and modeling. Prerequisite: CPSY 5000.

Introduction to Animal Assisted Interventions

Phil Tedeschi and Laura Meyer will co-teach this course on animal-assisted interventions and best clinical practice. Professor Tedeschi will teach the clinical component; populations of clients and how AAT can best be used to treat them; the difference between animal assisted activities, therapy, and education (AAA/T/E); working animals and assistance animals; operant conditioning and the basic principles of animal psychology and learning theory; intervention techniques. Dr. Meyer will provide information on the various animal species and their characteristics that are salient to therapy; how they can be used in therapy; recent research in the field; review psychological diagnostic and assessment tools and how they might be used. The course will also feature a number of guest lecturers who will share their expertise in the field.

Issues in Measurement Lab

Optional. Focused assistance with basic math skills; review and clarification of class topics.

Existential and Humanistic Theory and Therapy

Historical roots and basic assumption of existential and humanistic views. Students encouraged to integrate materials with their personal values and assumptions about human nature and their interaction with clients.

Physiological Lab I

Optional. Assistance with material covered in CPSY 4170.

Behavior-Analytic Principles 1

This course covers philosophical foundations, assumptions, and principles underlying major systems and models of behaviorism. Emphasis is given to the philosophy of science called radical behaviorism and its behavior-analytic functional-contextualistic tradition. Course I specifically targets contingency-shaping selection processes based upon Pavlovian and operant conditioning paradigms. Recommended prerequisite: CPSY 5000.

Behavioral Analysis Principles Lab
Behavior-Analytic Principles 2

This course covers philosophical foundations, assumptions, and principles relevant to cultural-linguistic practices. Emphasis is given to the philosophy of science called radical behaviorism and its behavior-analytic functional-contextualistic traditions. Course 2 specifically addresses verbal relational contingency selection processes based upon cultural and its verbal community. Prerequisite: CPSY 5420.

Behavior-Analytic Assessment/Case Formulation

This course covers the philosophical foundations, assumptions, and principles relevant to behavioral assessment and case formulation tactics. Emphasis is given to the philosophy of science called radical behaviorism and its behavior-analytic functional-contextualistic traditions. This course specifically targets an empirical data-driven approach to idiographic assessment for purposes of developing conceptual analyses from the contextual- functional analytic perspective. Prerequisites: CPSY 5420, CPSY 5422.

Behavior-Analytic Intervention

This course provides an overview of issues, principles and methods basic to clinical practice and intervention. Emphasis is given to the philosophy of science called radical behaviorism and its behavior-analytic functional- contextualistic traditions. This course specifically targets a range of commonly used methods of intervention (e.g., counter-conditioning and exposure-based treatments, guided action strategies, acceptance-commitment approaches, and Eastern interventions). Issues relevant to the structuring of therapy sessions, the therapeutic relationship, behavioral non adherence, empirical research, and other topics of therapeutic interest will be reviewed. This course will incorporate the use of experiential exercises, modeled demonstration, and behavior rehearsal methods for training purposes. Prerequisites: CPSY 5420, 5422, 5423.

Health Psychology

This course is designed to provide students with a broad overview of the salient empirical and theoretical aspects of health psychology and behavioral medicine. The course will emphasize the role that psychological variables play in the development, exacerbation, treatment and prognosis of both acute and chronic illness. We will also highlight sociopolitical and cultural discourse surrounding end-of-life decision making, healthcare accessibility and the phenomenology of a disabled population.

Health Psychology Service Learning Seminar

The Health Psychology Service Learning Seminar provides the opportunity for students to gain clinical experience with the underserved/underrepresented populations covered in the Health Psychology course (CPSY 5466). Students who enroll in the Seminar must agree to complete 20 hours of supervised clinical service with an agency and supervisor of their choice.

Sport & Performance Psychology Practicum in Collegiate Athletics I

This is the first course in a year long, three-part sequence. This course serves the purpose of providing: a) practice in sport and performance psychology in a NCAA Collegiate Athletic Department under the supervision of licensed practitioners; b) an opportunity for students to learn about sport and performance psychology through observation and experiential opportunities; and c) information on professional development and conduct. The course requires didactic and experiential activities. The didactic component covers the practice of sport and performance consulting, focusing on gaining entry and building working relationships. Current research is integrated with theory, emphasizing empirically validated approaches to best practice.

Sport & Performance Psychology Practicum in Collegiate Athletics II

This is the second course in a year long, three-part sequence. This course serves the purpose of providing: a) practice in sport and performance psychology in a NCAA Collegiate Athletic Department under the supervision of licensed practitioners; b) an opportunity for students to learn about sport and performance psychology through observation and experiential opportunities; and c) information on professional development and conduct. The course requires didactic and experiential activities. Psychological consultation, best practices, and professional development issues in sport and performance psychology are addressed.

Sport & Performance Psychology Practicum in Collegiate Athletics III

This is the third course in a year long, three-part sequence. This course serves the purpose of providing: a) practice in sport and performance psychology in a NCAA Collegiate Athletic Department under the supervision of licensed practitioners; b) an opportunity for students to learn about sport and performance psychology through observation and experiential opportunities; and c) information on professional development and conduct. The course requires didactic and experiential activities. Psychological consultation, best practices, and professional development issues in sport and performance psychology are addressed.

Integrated Primary Care

This course is designed to provide an introduction to the field of Integrated Primary Care (IPC). Primary health care physicians currently serve as the de-facto mental health care providers for approximately 50-80% of the patients they serve. Psychologists are desperately needed to support primary care, yet traditional clinical training does not adequately prepare them to work in this field. Students in this course can expect to acquire a solid knowledge in IPC that will enable them to function effectively in the primary care culture. A clinical exposure component are required so students can experience the pace and problem range seen in the primary care office. Class size is limited. Students not enrolled in the PsyD program must petition the instructor for approval to register.

Diagnosis & Treatment of Children

The focus of this course will be on the evaluation and treatment of children. Considerations concerning the particulars of the evaluation process will be discussed. An integrative approach to child treatment will be presented with a "child-in-family" approach. Play therapy approaches and techniques will be described and contrasted. Behavioral approaches will be discussed. Work with populations common in child work will be discussed, such as children in high-conflict divorce families, learning disabilities, ADHD, mood disorders and situations of physical/sexual abuse.

Diagnosis & Treatment of Adolescents

This course focuses on counseling and psychotherapy with adolescents from a variety of approaches, including developmental, integrative, psychodynamic, person-centered, reality, rational emotive, cognitive behavioral and systemic. Topics will include the ethical and legal issues involved in psychological interventions, culturally responsive counseling, and orchestrating productive family sessions with challenging adolescents.

Couples Therapy

Theory, techniques and research relating to couples therapy, including theoretical perspectives: behavioral couples therapy, emotionally-focused couples therapy and object relations couples therapy. The course also addresses specific problem areas, including domestic violence, infidelity, depression, anxiety, substance abuse and personality disorders. Prerequisite: CPSY 5030.

Family Therapy

Theory, techniques and research relating to family therapy, including several theoretical perspectives: behavioral, experiential, psychodynamic, multigenerational approaches. Special topics covered include working with community resources, addressing developmental issues of children, working with medical and school systems, utilizing cultural factors in planning programs and interventions and adults in family therapy. Prerequisites: CPSY 5030

Adult Psychopathology I

Theoretical understanding and treatment of adults within a developmental, ego analytic framework. The first quarter course focuses on differences between the neuroses, borderline personality disorder, and psychoses. Prerequisite: CPSY 5020

Adult Psychopathology II

Theoretical understanding and treatment of adults within a developmental, ego analytic framework. Second quarter – the neuroses. Prerequisites: CPSY 5020.

Intersubjective Systems Theory

This course will focus on psychotherapy from the perspectives of intersubjective systems theory in working with adults. We will examine the co-creation of the therapeutic relationship, the making of meaning, empathic listening, attuning to the other's affective experience and putting the other's subjective experience into words. We will develop treatment plans and case formulations that are consistent with this perspective.

Introduction to Pediatric Neuropsychological Assessment

Pediatric neuropsychology integrates many basic sciences including behavioral Neurology, developmental psychology, neuroanatomy, psychopathology, and psychological assessment. The role of pediatric neuropsychologist is to provide comprehensive assessment, consultation, and intervention in the context of a developing child. The course will review important concepts, theories, and empirical research in the field of pediatric neuropsychology. Students will learn the basic rationale in conducting a pediatric neuropsychological evaluation, including a brief review of many common pediatric assessment measures. In addition, many common pediatric disorders will be reviewed from a neuropsychological perspective including: Dyslexia, Attention Deficit hyperactivity Disorder, Pervasive Development Disorders, Traumatic Brain Injury, Seizure Disorders, and Mental Retardation. Upon completion of the course the student will have a greater appreciation of a neuropsychological conceptual framework and have a better understanding of specific pediatric disorders.

Suicide Prevention, Intervention and Postvention

Suicide is a serious public health issue and challenge for the nation, Colorado, and our local communities. In 2009, suicide claimed the lives of almost 34,000 people in the United States and is the second leading cause of death for college students and men ages 25-34. In Colorado, there are many more suicides than motor vehicle deaths. While most clinicians are focused on the assessment and treatment of people at high risk for suicide, a more comprehensive approach is needed to prevent people from becoming suicidal in the first place. This course covers best practices in suicide prevention, intervention and "postvention" (suicide crisis response) and will explore the particular issues of several vulnerable populations.

Contemporary Issues in Geropsych

This course addresses issues in aging. Topics include healthy aging, aging issues in diverse populations, contemporary options for care, challenges in service delivery, the interplay of medical and mental health needs, mental health treatment approaches and issues, and end-of-life issues.

Advanced Rorschach Analysis

This course is an exploration of advanced topics in Rorschach interpretation. Topics will include: conceptual understanding of the Comprehensive System; content and sequence analysis; differential diagnosis; integrating alternative systems of interpretation with the Comprehensive System; development and use of special scales; appropriate use of computerized interpretation; and integration of Rorschach analysis with personality theory. Prerequisites include course work in Rorschach administration, scoring and basic interpretation; and in personality theory. Students will be expected to score, analyze, and present Rorschach protocols.

Advanced Personality Assessment

Projective techniques including Rorschach, storytelling tasks and projective drawings, with a focus both on test content and the patient-examiner relationship in the context of the diagnostic consultant. Prerequisites: CPSY 5130, 5680, 5690.

Self Report Assessment Lab

Optional accompaniment to CPSY 5706, for students anticipating a need for extra help with report writing.

Therapeutic Assessment

This course explores the advances made in understanding and enhancing the therapeutic impact that assessment can have on clients. We read broadly in the area: from the genesis of collaborative assessment fueled by Fischer to the empirical foundations and structure of Therapeutic Assessment provided by Finn to novel applications of the approach highlighted by Handler. This important movement in assessment is applicable to personality, cognitive, and neuropsychological assessment as well as any professional endeavor that aims to help clients understand themselves in life-changing ways. The course is designed for those with a solid foundation in assessment who wish to develop greater facility in helping their clients.

Supervision Practicum I

This is a four quarter sequence, 1 quarter credit hour/ quarter, in which advanced students will have the opportunity to supervise on beginning student under the overall supervision of a faculty member. Each quarter practicum will include appropriate level readings, group discussions and report writing. Admission to the course with instructor's approval.

Supervision Practicum II

This is a four quarter sequence, 1 quarter credit hour/ quarter, in which advanced students will have the opportunity to supervise one beginning student under the overall supervision of a faculty member. Each quarter practicum will include appropriate level readings, group discussions and report writing. Admission to the course with instructor's approval.

Supervision Practicum III

This is a four quarter sequence, 1 quarter credit hour/ quarter, in which advanced students will have the opportunity to supervise one beginning student under the overall supervision on a faculty member. Each quarter practicum will include appropriate level readings, group discussions and report writing. Admission to the course with instructor's approval.

Supervision Practicum IV

This is a four quarter sequence, 1 quarter credit hour/ quarter, in which advanced students will have the opportunity to supervise one beginning student under the overall supervision of a faculty member. Each quarter practicum will include appropriate level readings, group discussions and report writing. Admission to the course with instructor's approval.

Professional Issues II

This class provides an organized and comprehensive approach to pre-doctoral psychology internship selection, emphasizing an understanding of "fit." Topics covered include choosing sites; writing cover letters, CVs, and AAPI essays; preparing application materials; interviewing techniques; rank ordering sites; and dealing with emotions related to the process. The course syllabus includes important readings from the current literature. Lectures are balanced with guest appearances by DU Writing Center staff and others. Opportunities are given for role play among the students.

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

This course focuses on clinical applications of cognitive-behavioral theory. Major theorists in the area are reviewed, including Ellis, Beck, Lazarus, and Meichenbaum. Research utilizing cognitive-behavioral therapy as an evidence-based practice are reviewed. In addition, key cognitive behavioral techniques are demonstrated and practiced.

Psychopharmacology

This course focuses on the various medications prescribed by psychiatrists to alter consciousness, modify behavior, and/or alleviate symptoms in the treatment of mental disorders including depression, bipolar disorder, anxiety, eating disorders, and psychoses. Topics such as sleep, pain and addiction will be covered, as well as drug interactions, psychotropic drugs in pregnancy, the treatment of children, geriatrics, and the psychologist-psychiatrist relationship.

Business Issues in Professional Psychology

This course introduces students to business principles as they apply to professional psychology. Students think through various business practice decisions, such as starting, managing, marketing, and diversifying a psychology practice and consider the related legal, ethical, and financial issues.

Doctoral Paper Development

This course is designed to facilitate the development and writing of the doctoral paper. Students are expected to adhere to the GSPP Doctoral Paper Guidelines and the APA style guidelines. A major feature of the class is student-to-student sharing and critiquing of doctoral project ideas and plans. Students are expected to take advantage of this opportunity to hone their writing skills and develop their doctoral paper proposal. Students have complete the proposal phase of their project further develop their research methodology.