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Funded Grants

Kennedy Institute

Funded Grants

Creating Better, Smarter Assessments: The CREMAT Project

Funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), the CREMAT Project is a $2.5 million grant that will fund efforts by Sarama and Clements, along with colleagues (and mother-and-son team) Curtis Tatsuoka and Kikumi Tatsuoka, to create and test a new early mathematics assessment. This assessment will use innovative statistical and computer technology to give teachers more useful and detailed information about children's knowledge of mathematics in less time than existing assessments. Fast but fully informative assessments help teachers really know their students, and support their use of the powerful teaching strategy of 'formative assessment' or individualizing learning.

Connect4Learning (C4L)—Math, Science, Literacy, and Social-emotional Development: An Interdisciplinary Approach to Early Childhood

We have been funded by the NSF to combine our work on the Building Blocks math curriculum with that of colleagues in other fields. The Connect4Learning interdisciplinary curriculum will connect four basic domains of learning. In addition to mathematics, the grant includes experts in science (Kimberly Brenneman, Rutgers University), literacy/language (Nell Duke, Michigan State University) and social-emotional development (M. L. Hemmeter, Vanderbilt University). Early childhood is full of debates about subject matter, with arguments arising about new emphases on mathematics taking too much time away from literacy. Science is rarely mentioned. Further, there is little research on whether an emphasis in one area necessarily means less emphasis in others, or whether they can be combined each to the benefit of others. The researchers believe the latter, and believe Connect4Learning curriculum will encourage all children to develop their full potential in all four areas--a potential that is greater than often realized.

Children's Measurement Project

This project is studying the learning and teaching of measurement in early and elementary education. Conducted in collaboration with Jeffrey Barrett form Illinois State University, we are producing research-based developmental progressions in measurement across a seven-year span. These developmental progressions will build on and elaborate existing research-based learning trajectories (Sarama & Clements, 2009).

This project will test the hypothesis that current learning trajectories for geometric measurement provide specific, generalizable resources and tools to improve instruction, assessment, and curriculum development. In subjecting these LTs to rigorous evaluation, and refining them as necessary, we will produce a more complete research basis for them as well as for the measurement and fraction modeling called for by the Common Core State Standards. We actually wrote the learning trajectory for measurement for the Common Core State Standards (and the standards themselves were based on this learning trajectory), and we wish to take it to the next level.