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MENTAL HEALTH

Geographic Regions with Refugee/Immigrant Populations

Asia

Southeast Asia (general):

Authors: J. Abe, N. Zane, and K. Chun
Title: Differential Responses to Trauma: Migration-Related Discriminants of Post- Traumatic Stress Disorder Among Southeast Asian Refugees
Journal Name: Journal of Community Psychology
Volume, Issue: Volume 22, Number 2
Date: 1994
Page: 121
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: Unavailable

Authors: Lynn R. August and Barbara A. Gianola
Title: Symptoms of War Trauma Induced Psychiatric Disorders: Southeast Asian Refugees and Vietnam Veterans
Journal Name: International Migration Review
Volume, Issue: Volume 21, Number 3
Date: Fall 1987
Pages: 820-32
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: The symptomology of Southeast Asian refugees suffering from mental health disorders is compared with that of Vietnam war veterans suffering from psychiatric disorders related to war trauma, based on a review of published data. Both of these groups share common unresolved feelings and have similar clinical manifestations resulting from the intensity of wartime atrocities. Similarities in the symptoms presented by these two groups suggest that Southeast Asian refugees may also suffer from the same type of war trauma induced psychiatric disorder as the Vietnam war veterans.

Author: M. Beiser
Title: Influences of Time, Ethnicity, and Attachment on Depression in Southeast Asian Refugees
Journal Name: The American Journal of Psychiatry
Volume, Issue: Volume 145, Number 1
Date: January 1988
Pages: 46-51
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: Unavailable

Author: Fred Bemak
Title: Cross-Cultural Family Therapy With Southeast Asian Refugees
Journal Name: Journal of Strategic and Systematic Therapies
Volume, Issue: Volume 8
Date: Summer 1989
Pages: 22-7
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: Yes
Abstract: Unavailable

Authors: R. Chi-Ying Chung and K. M. Lin
Title: Help-Seeking Behavior Among Southeast Asian Refugees
Journal Name: Journal of Community Psychology
Volume, Issue: Volume 22, Number 2
Date: 1994
Page: 109
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: Unavailable

Author: J. P. Hiegel
Title: Psychosocial and Mental Health Needs of Refugees: Experiences From Southeast Asia
Journal Name: Tropical Doctor
Volume, Issue: Volume 21, Supplement Number 1
Date: 1991
Page: 63
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: Unavailable

Authors: Kasumi K. Hirayama, Hisashi Hirayama, and Muammer Cetingok
Title: Mental Health Promotion for Southeast Asian Refugees in the USA Journal Name: International Social Work
Volume, Issue: Volume 36, Number 2
Date: April 1993
Pages: 119-30
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: Unavailable

Author: P. Kelley
Title: The Application of Family Systems Theory to Mental Health Services for Southeast Asian Refugees
Journal Name: Journal of Multicultural Social Work
Volume, Issue: Volume 2, Number 1
Date: 1992
Pages: 1-13
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: This paper describes a training project of work with Southeast Asian refugees using an integrated family systems approach. The author found using a model integrating a structural, strategic, life cycle, and Milan systematic therapy helpful at three levels of the project work: consulting with agencies serving the population, training students for this work, and intervening clinically with the refugees themselves.

Authors: Richard F. Mollica, Grace Wyshak, and James Lavelle
Title: The Psychosocial Impact of War Trauma and Torture on Southeast Asian Refugees
Journal Name: The American Journal of Psychiatry
Volume, Issue: Volume 144, Number 12
Date: December 1987
Pages: 1567-72
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: Yes
Abstract: More than 700,000 refugees from Southeast Asia have settled in the U.S. since 1975. Although many have suffered serious trauma, including torture, few clinical reports have described their trauma-related symptoms and psychosocial problems. The authors conducted a treatment study of 52 patients in a clinic for Indochinese. They found that these patients were a highly traumatized group: each had experienced a mean of 10 traumatic events and 2 torture experiences. Many of the patients had concurrent diagnoses of major affective disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder as well as medical and social disabilities associated with their history of trauma. The authors also found that Cambodian women without spouses demonstrated more serious psychiatric and social impairments than all other Indochinese patient groups.

Author: Carrington U. Nguyen
Title: Counseling Indochinese Refugee Women Rape Survivors
Journal Name: Administration in Social Work
Volume, Issue: Volume 45, Number 3
Date: September 1992
Pages: 19-25
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: This study is based on the author's experience as a counselor of rape survivors and traumatized refugees at two refugee camps in Malaysia. Analysis of the work revealed a particular mental dissonance in the women which resulted from the clash between their culture and new self-concepts necessary for their recovery. It was demonstrated that counseling methods that emphasize self-esteem, personal values, and self-sufficiency are necessary for the recovery of traumatized people in host countries such as Australia and Canada. Information on clients" psychological and social issues and needs can increase the awareness of support groups regarding this matter. Establishment and training of these women's groups, composed of volunteers having the same cultural background as the clients, will facilitate the survivors" access to professional services.

Authors: Z. Porte and J. Torney-Purta
Title: Depression and Academic Achievement Among Indochinese Refugee Unaccompanied Minors in Ethnic and Non-Ethnic Placements
Journal Name: American Journal of Orthopsychiatry
Volume, Issue: Volume 57, Number 4
Date: October 1987
Pages: 536-47
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: A study examined the effects of critical elements in the past and present life experiences of Indochinese minors on their adaptation to the U.S. Of particular concern was whether life satisfaction and depression, the balance of American versus ethnic identity, and academic achievement could be predicted on the basis of placement mode (Caucasian or ethnic foster care, group home, or own family). The refugee adolescents who were resettled with ethnic foster families were significantly less depressed and had higher grade-point-averages than those in foster care with Caucasian families or in group homes. The ongoing presence of an adult of similar ethnicity to the adolescent appeared to mitigate against the stress of adaptation to a new country.

Vietnam

Authors: Dedra Buchwald et al
Title: Prevalence of Depressive Symptoms Among Established Vietnamese Refugees in the United States
Journal Name: Journal of General Internal Medicine: Official Journal of the Society for Research and Education in Primary Care Internal Medicine
Volume, Issue: Volume 7
Date: January 1, 1994
Page: 43
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: Yes
Abstract: Unavailable

Authors: E. Hauff and P. Vaglum
Title: Organized Violence and the Stress of Exile: Predictors of Mental Health in a Community Cohort of Vietnamese Refugees Three Years After Resettlement
Journal Name: The British Journal of Psychiatry
Volume, Issue: Volume 166, Number 3
Date: 1995
Page: 360
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: Unavailable

Authors: E. Hauff and P. Vaglum
Title: Vietnamese Boat Refugees: The Influence of War and Flight Traumatization on Mental Health on Arrival in the Country of Resettlement: A Community Cohort Study of Vietnamese Refugees in Norway
Journal Name: Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica
Volume, Issue: Volume 88, Number 3
Date: September 1993
Page: 162
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: Unavailable

Authors: R. H. Nishimoto, K. L. Chau, and R. W. Roberts
Title: The Psychological Status of Vietnamese Chinese Women in Refugee Camps
Journal Name: Journal of Women and Social Work
Volume, Issue: Volume 4, Number 3
Date: Fall 1989
Pages: 51-64
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: The psychological resources that refugee women bring to bear in refugee camps are important predictors of their and their families" eventual adaptation to their country of final settlement. Reported on is a study of the psychological status of 59 Vietnamese Chinese women in refugee camps in Hong Kong who were awaiting permanent resettlement. The study also examined factors that affected the mental health of these refugees such as the women's report of stressful life events, the availability of social supports, and various aspects of their experience in the refugee camps. Implications for social work services and social policy are presented.

Authors: Tuong Phan and Derrick Silove
Title: The Influence of Culture on Psychiatric Assessment: The Vietnamese Refugee
Journal Name: Psychiatric Services
Volume, Issue: Volume 48, Number 1
Date: January 1997
Pages: 86-90
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: Yes
Abstract: The influence of culture on psychiatric diagnostic assessments remains controversial. The authors outline differences between the emic approach to assessment, which is informed by ethnographic concepts of the centrality of culture in shaping the psyche and its expressions, and the etic approach, which downplays cultural effects and focuses on the universal elements in manifestations of psychological distress. Based on the experience of assessing Vietnamese refugees in Australia, the authors explore semantic, contextual, and conceptual factors that may impede the psychiatric assessment of patients from other cultures. Areas of misinterpretation are illustrated using examples from the Vietnamese language. The authors discuss how variations in politicohistorical experiences within ethnic populations may result in differences in the modes of expressing and understanding mental illness. Recognition of the tension between etic and emic perspectives allows the clinician to draw on the most useful elements of each in assessing and treating individual patients.

Author: T. V. Tran
Title: Psychological Traumas and Depression in a Sample of Vietnamese People in the United States
Journal Name: Health and Social Work
Volume, Issue: Volume 18, Number 3
Date: August 1993
Pages: 184-94
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: This article investigates the relationships among premigration stresses, nightmares, acculturation stresses, personal efficacy, and depression in a sample of 147 adult Vietnamese Americans. The analysis revealed that premigration stresses, nightmares, and acculturation stresses had significant indirect effects on depression. Acculturation stresses diminish personal efficacy, and a weakness of personal efficacy leads to higher depression. Age, gender, marital status, and English language ability also exert differential effects on premigration stresses, nightmares, acculturation stresses, personal efficacy, and depression. Health care professionals, social workers, health care organizations, and social work researchers should be more culturally sensitive when planning and implementing services and developing research instruments.

Authors: Tran T. Van, R. Wright, and C. H. Mindel
Title: Alienation Among Vietnamese Refugees in the United States: A Causal Approach
Journal Name: Journal of Social Service Research
Volume, Issue: Volume 11, Number 1
Date: 1987
Pages: 59-75
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: According to a survey conducted in 1979, alienation is ranked third among the six areas representing serious problems for Vietnamese refugees. It is preceded only by loss of role identity and loss of self-esteem. A study developed and tested a causal model of alienation among a probability sample of Vietnamese refugees. The findings indicated that marital status, social support, social interaction anxiety, self-identity, and length of time in the U.S. directly predict feelings of alienation. The social support variable, however, was the most important predictor. Background variables for the most part had no notable direct effects on alienation.

Cambodia

Authors: Eve Bernstein Carlson and Rhonda Rosser-Hogan
Title: Cross-Cultural Response to Trauma: A Study of Traumatic Experiences and Posttraumatic Symptoms in Cambodian Refugees
Journal Name: Journal of Traumatic Stress
Volume, Issue: Volume 7
Date: January 1, 1994
Page: 43
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: Yes
Abstract: Unavailable

Author: S. B. Strober
Title: Social Work Interventions to Alleviate Cambodian Refugee Psychological Distress
Journal Name: International Social Work
Volume, Issue: Volume 37, Number 1
Date: January 1994
Pages: 23-5
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: The poll taken at random among 102 Cambodian refugees (May-Aug 1989) served to determine the extent of environmental social support and refugee characteristics in the process of acculturation. Fifty percent of the variation is explained by education, the time spent in the country, and the impact of psychological decline. In addition, the date showed that there was a slight correlation between the observed social support and acculturation adjustment, and that there was a strong correlation between the latter and the lack of psychological decline. Furthermore, there was no significant correlation between the observed social support and psychological collapse. Results suggest that the observed family and community support does not promote acculturation, but rather a lower incidence of psychological decline. In addition, it suggests that traditional family and community support does not count when it comes to alleviating emotional problems. Social work, education, psychological collapse, conjugal support and the amount of time spent in the country offer usable information in the application of social work to the task of reducing emotional problems of these people.

Laos

Author: A. Schapiro
Title: Adjustment and Identity Formation of Lao Refugee Adolescents
Journal Name: Smith College Studies in Social Work
Volume, Issue: Volume 58, Number 3
Date: June 1988
Pages: 157-81
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: An exploratory study was undertaken to ascertain how Laotian refugee adolescents are adjusting to life in the U.S., with particular focus on areas that impact identity formation. Potential problem areas examined were family relationships, school functioning, social status and acceptance, peer relationships, and future planning. The primary stressor encountered by the subjects on their arrival in the U.S. was racial prejudice; other significant factors included academic and language deficits, conflicts with parents, difficulty finding an appropriate peer group, and problems adjusting to lowered social and economic status. All but 3 subjects appeared to be functioning well, although 9 showed signs of depression. Outreach to this group by culturally sensitive and compassionate social workers is warranted.

Afghanistan

Author: Juliene G. Lipson
Title: Afghan Refugees in California: Mental Health Issues
Journal Name: Issues in Mental Health Nursing
Volume, Issue: Volume 14, Number 4
Date: 1993
Page: 411
Hard Copy at CRIIC Library: No
Abstract: Unavailable

 

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