Skip navigation

Josef Korbel School of International StudiesSié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security & Diplomacy

Faculty Panel

News

Sié Center News

NPR: Why Civil Resistance Movements Succeed

August 21, 2014

NPR News—Steve Inskeep talks to Erica Chenoweth and Maria Stephan about why non-violent resistance campaigns work better than armed rebellion. Their article on the subject is in Foreign Affairs magazine. Listen Now >>


U.S. RESEARCHERS TO STUDY CANADA'S COUNTER-TERRORISM EFFORTS

August 12, 2014

The Ottowa Citizen—Researchers from Denver and Maryland universities will be in Ottawa this fall trying to find out if Canada's counter-terrorism policies are effective, part of a federally funded research initiative born from the Air India attack. Erica Chenoweth, an associate professor with the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies, was awarded $303,664 for her research team. Read More >>


Job Posting: Assistant Professor at the Korbel School and Sié Center

August 10, 2014

The Korbel School is seeking to fill a tenure-track position at the assistant professor level focused on gender and violence to start September 2015 and be part of the Sié Center's dynamic research program. View the Posting >>


Job Posting: Post-Doctoral Fellows at the Sié Center

July 31, 2014

The Sié Center has openings PENDING FUNDING for three (3) Lecturer/Post-doctoral fellows that will be part of a new research, education, and policy program. The program is focused on nonviolent strategies in violent contexts and endeavors to study the strategies of a wide range of actors (including local civilians, local and transnational businesses, and transnational non-governmental organizations, among others). View the Posting >>


Drop Your Weapons: When and Why Civil Resistance Works

June 16, 2014

In Foreign Affairs, Associate Professor Erica Chenoweth, with Maria Stephan, writes about the success of revolts against authoritarian regimes that embrace civil resistance rather than violence—between 1900 and 2006, campaigns of nonviolent resistance against authoritarian regimes were twice as likely to succeed as violent movements.  Read More >>


Colombia Calls a Draw in the War on Drugs

June 13, 2014

In Foreign Policy, Assistant Professor Oliver Kaplan writes about how after years of bloodshed, Colombia's government is teaming up with its former rebel enemies to beat the drug problem.  Read More >>


Confronting the Curse: The Economics and Geopolitics of Natural Resource Governance

June 4, 2014

Cullen S. Hendrix and Marcus Noland presented the findings of their new book from the Peterson Institute, Confronting the Curse: The Economics and Geopolitics of Natural Resource Governance , on June 4, 2014. Instead of success and prosperity, producers of diamonds, gold, oil, and other commodities—many in the least developed parts of Africa and Asia—often remain mired in poverty and plagued by economic mismanagement, political authoritarianism, foreign exploitation, and violent conflict. The condition is captured in the phrase "the resource curse." Coauthors Hendrix and Noland review recent developments as poor countries struggle to avoid the resource curse but fall too often into that trap. They call for support for international efforts to encourage greater transparency and improved management of natural resource wealth and for new partnerships between the West and the developing world to confront the curse.  Read more or watch the video >>


A Nonviolent Alternative for Ukraine

May 28, 2014

In Foreign Policy, Associate Professor Erica Chenoweth, together with Stephen Zunes, writes about the rising tide of violence Ukraine faces in its restive east, and why nonviolent activism is the best strategy for fighting back.  Read More >>


Department of Defense Awards Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures a $1.05 Million Research Grant 

May 27, 2014

The Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures has been awarded a $1.05 million research grant as part of the Department of Defense's Minerva Initiative. The awarded project, "Taking Development (Im)Balance Seriously: Using New Approaches to Measure and Model State Fragility," will develop a new, more comprehensive index for measuring and monitoring state fragility in the future. Pardee Center Associate Director Jonathan D. Moyer and Director Barry B. Hughes are the principal investigators on this project. Other co-investigators include Sié Center faculty members Erica Chenoweth, Cullen Hendrix, Oliver Kaplan, and Timothy Sisk. This will be the second Minerva grant awarded to both Chenoweth and Hendrix.  Read More >>


Beyond Boko Haram: Nigeria's Human-Trafficking Crisis

May 19, 2014

In an op-ed for The National Interest, Assistant Professor Oliver Kaplan and MA Candidate Lauren Jekowsky analyze recent reports on human-trafficking in Nigeria to get a better sense of the situation there. Read More >>


DU Magazine Profiles Erica Chenoweth

May 12, 2014

Erica Chenoweth, who joined the Korbel School in 2012, has focused her research on investigating whether and when nonviolence works — and influential groups around the world are taking notice.  Read More >>


Kidnapping of 200 girls puts spotlight on human trafficking

May 6, 2014

Denver 9 News—A U.S. team is on the way to help search for more than 200 girls kidnapped from a Nigerian school.The militant Islamic group Boko Haram is threatening to sell the girls into slavery. The incident is putting a spotlight on human trafficking. While it's less prevalent in the United States, assistant professor Oliver Kaplan at the University of Denver says it does happen. Read More >>


Great Debate Transcending Our Origins: Violence, Humanity, and the Future

April 15, 2014

On April 5, Arizona State University held an event titled "The Great Debate, Transcending Our Origins: Violence, Humanity, and the Future." The first panel of the evening, "The Origins of Violence," featured scholars and writers Steven Pinker, Richard Wrangham, Erica Chenoweth, Adrian Raine, John Mueller and Sarah Mathew discussing the development of violence from the brain to world wars. Watch >>


Read in Slate Magazine: Food Prices Are Going to Topple a Lot More Governments

April 9, 2014

"We've known since the times of the Roman poet Juvenal"—he of bread and circuses fame—"that food is an inherently political commodity," says Cullen Hendrix, a political scientist at the University of Denver's Korbel School of International Relations and a leading authority on the relationship between food and conflict. Read More >>


Chenoweth Launches "The Engaged"

April 9, 2014

There is a void in our academy and we would like you to help us fix it. This is the call to action from Associate Professor Erica Chenoweth and co-convener Christian Davenport from the University of Michigan on their newly launched website "The Engaged" part of an initiative to bring together scholars, students and citizens who wish to change the world. Read More >>


Read in Psychology Today: Violent Versus Nonviolent Revolutions: Which Way Wins?

April  8, 2014

During her training as a political scientist, Erica Chenoweth was taught to assume that the most effective tool for achieving political goals is violence. After all, no evil dictator is going to give up his autocratic power without a fight, and throughout history, there have been numerous examples of tyrannical governments viciously crushing their opposition. Read More >>


Global Report on Climate Change Cites Work of Cullen Hendrix

April 1, 2014

Cullen Hendrix, Assistant Professor at the Josef Korbel School and affiliate of the School's Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy, was cited in the just-released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)'s Working Group II report Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability. In its discussion of climate change as a cause of conflict, the report references Hendrix and Idean Salehyan's article in the J ournal of Peace Research which uses data from the Social Conflict in Africa Database (SCAD) to examine the relationship between environmental shocks and social unrest.  Read the report >>


Political Violence @ a Glance Wins Award

March 28, 2014

Political Violence @ a Glance was twice honored at the OAIS Blogging Awards' ceremonies at the International Studies Association Annual Meeting last week. Read More >>


Chenoweth Receives the Karl Deutsch Award

March 27, 2014

The University of Denver's Josef Korbel School congratulates Associate Professor Erica Chenoweth for receiving the International Studies Association's 2014 Karl Deutsch Award. According to the International Studies Association, the Karl Deutsch Award is presented annually to a young scholar who is judged to have made the most significant contribution to the study of International Relations and Peace Research. Read More >>


Watch on C-SPAN: Climate Change, Austerity, and the Return of Authoritarianism

March 6, 2014

On March 6 at the University of Denver, a panel discussion was held on topics such as science, moral issues in economics, climate change and the use of non-violent civil disobedience. Michael Ash is an author of an essay pointing out errors in an economic study widely cited by advocates of austerity programs. Stephanie Herring published a report on human-caused climate change. Erica Chenoweth talked about of non-violent civil disobedience, explaining why sanctions often do not work, with examples from her research on Occupy Wall Street and civil rights era. Former Ambassador Christopher Hill moderated.

"Global Challenges: Climate Change, Austerity, and the Return of Authoritarianism" was a panel of the event, Transformational Voices: An Afternoon with Leading Global Thinkers, featured six of Foreign Policy magazine's "100 Leading Global Thinkers of 2013" held by the Josef Korbel School and its Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy. Watch >>


Obama warns Russia of 'costs' in Ukraine

February 29, 2014

Professor Oliver Kaplan appeared on Denver 9 News to discuss the situation in Ukraine. His remarks centered on President Obama's response to military movements taken by the Russian Federation inside Ukraine.  Watch >>


Power to the Peaceful: Dr. Erica Chenoweth on Nonviolent Resistance

February 14, 2014

Resistance movements, rebellions, and revolutions are some of the most influential forces shaping our world today. Yet, as recent unrest in places like Egypt and Syria make painfully clear, overthrowing a powerful regime is dangerous, difficult business. Dr. Erica Chenoweth—Associate professor at the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies—specializes in the question of what makes a successful resistance movement. Her book, "Why Civil Resistance Works: the Strategic Logic of Nonviolent Conflict", which she co-wrote with Maria J. Stephan, argues that there is no greater and more effective tool for ousting an oppressive regime than non-violent, civil resistance. Dr. Chenoweth, who will be in town for a lecture on Monday, spoke with KRCC's Jake Brownell from her office in Denver. Listen >>


Erica Chenoweth is named to Foreign Policy's list of Top Global Thinkers of 2013

December 3, 2013 

Professor Erica Chenoweth has been named to Foreign Policy Magazine's Top Global Thinkers list. The editors of the December issue of Foreign Policy Magazine indicate that Chenoweth was named as a Top Global Thinker in the Healers category "For proving Ghandi right." They further explain, "She [Chenoweth] uses her data to show that nonviolent campaigns over the last century were twice as likely to succeed as violent ones. She also uses them to make arguments about current events: for instance, why U.S. strikes on Syria aren't wise and why Egypt's pro-government sit-ins over the summer were unlikely to work." Read More >>


Erica Chenoweth on Bloggingheads.tv - "Foreign Entanglements" with Robert Farley, Speaking on Civil Resistance

November 21, 2013

Erica Chenoweth speaks with Robert Farley about the effectiveness of non-violent protest. Erica works through the logic of why non-violence often proves a better practical choice than violent resistance, while discussing why so many movements nevertheless resort to violence. Erica contrasts Egypt's 2011 revolution and 2013 coup. They discuss the possibility of creating a policy infrastructure for supporting non-violent resistance. Is it possible to turn a violent movement toward non-violence? Plus: What Erica's research could have taught the Occupy movement. View Now >>  


Grassroots political participation key to ensure peace in Colombia: Conflict expert

November 21, 2013

While the momentum of peace talks is moving towards a deal, the Colombian people must be involved more to avoid the pitfalls that derailed previous attempts to end the country's armed conflict between the state and rebel group FARC, an expert on the Colombian conflict studies said. Oliver Kaplan of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, is an expert on non-violent response at the community level to the armed conflict in Colombia.  Read More >>


Oliver Kaplan on CNN's Global Public Square: Can Colombia build on its democratic opening?

November 19, 2013

A year ago today, peace negotiators in Colombia began working with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) rebel group to end a nearly 50-year bloody conflict. Although the government and rebels have continued to fight during talks, there is a sense of optimism after progress came on a long-running sticking point: political participation. Indeed, the lead government negotiator, a former vice president, has hailed the breakthrough as a "new democratic opening." So what exactly has changed?  Read More >>


Sié Fellow Pallavi Gulati Discusses her Time at the Sié Center with Fulbright Alumni News

November 18, 2013

Sié Fellow alumna Pallavi was the recipient of a US-UK Fulbright Scholarship to study at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. In the most recent issue of Fulbright Alumni News, Pallavi discusses her experience at the Korbel School and as a Sié Fellow. Read Now >>


View Erica Chenoweth's Presentation at TEDxBoulder

October 31, 2013

Last month, Professor Erica Chenoweth spoke at TEDxBoulder about the success of nonviolent civil resistance. She discussed her research on the impressive historical record of civil resistance in the 20th century and the promise of unarmed struggle in the 21st century. Her remarks focused on the so-called "3.5% rule"—the notion that no government can withstand a challenge of 3.5% of its population without either accommodating the movement or (in extreme cases) disintegrating. The video of this presentation is now available, and there are also write-ups about her presentation at the Washington Post and The Rational Insurgent View Now >>


"The Dissident's Toolkit" by Erica Chenoweth is published in Foreign Policy

October 25, 2013

Over the past few years we've grown used to the iconography of protest. In the wake of the Arab Spring, images of angry young street demonstrators shouting slogans, wielding signs, and confronting security forces have become almost commonplace. But just as often we've seen campaigns of public protest flounder or go into reverse: just look at Egypt and Libya, to name the most prominent cases. The recent surge of street demonstrations in Sudan once again confronts us with a fundamental question: How does public protest undermine authoritarian governments? Are demonstrations really the key to toppling autocrats?  Read More >>