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Natural Sciences & Mathematics

Degree Programs

Natural Sciences & Mathematics

Course Descriptions

Natural Sciences & Mathematics General Courses
0050 The Making of a Scientist (3 or 4 credits)

The principles disciplinary focus for this course is in science and mathematics. It exposes high school students to the societal need for science and mathematics. It will stress the roles scientists and mathematicians have in the technological process, especially their ethical responsibilities to society. The scienctific method is examined and practiced in three different disciplines. Aspects of science- and mathematical-based research are investigated. Course is open to high school students only. Prerequisites: high school algebra and geometry.


Biology
0940 Perspectives-Veterinary Med (2 credits)

Introduction to career areas in veterinary medicine through lectures, guest speakers and demonstrations.

1010 Concepts:Physiological Systems (3 credits)

First class in the 3-quarter introductory sequence required for students planning to major in biology or another science. Emphasis on physiological mechanisms in animals and plants. Co-requisite: BIOL 1020 lab section.

1011 Concepts: Cell & Molec Biology (3 credits)

Second class in the 3-quarter introductory sequence required for students planning to major in biology or another science. Emphasis on molecular and cellular levels of organization. Co-requisite: BIOL 1021 lab section.

1012 Concepts in Biology (3 credits)

Third class in the 3-quarter introductory sequence required for students planning to major in biology or another science. Emphasis on ecology, biological diversity and evolution. Co-requisite: BIOL 1022 lab section.

1020 Concepts:Physiol. Systems Lab (1 credits)

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Co-requisite: BIOL 1010 lecture section.

1021 Concepts:Cell&Mol Biology Lab (1 credits)

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Co-requisite: BIOL 1011 lecture section.

1022 Concepts in Biology Lab (1 credits)

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Co-requisite: BIOL 1012 lecture section.

1207 Ecology for New Millennium I (0 or 4 credits)

First class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors that explores the principles and science of ecology, the nature and consequences of human impacts on the environment, and the role of science in helping to formulate a policy of wise stewardship of the environment on regional and global scales. Examines the principles of ecology through readings, a lecture/discussion format, and field-oriented laboratories for hands on experience with populations, ecological communities and ecosystems.

1208 Ecology for New Millennium II (0 or 4 credits)

Second class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors that explores the principles and science of ecology, the nature and consequences of human impacts on the environment, and the role of science in helping to formulate a policy of wise stewardship of the environment on regional and global scales. Examines the ecology of our own species, beginning first with the biology of human population growth and regulation, then turning to issues of human environmental change and natural resource management with emphasis the role of science in problem identification, evaluation and resolution.

1209 Ecology for New Millennium III (0 or 4 credits)

Third class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors that explores the principles and science of ecology, the nature and consequences of human impacts on the environment, and the role of science in helping to formulate a policy of wise stewardship of the environment on regional and global scales. In-depth look at two environmental issues of global concern, climate change and declines in biodiversity. The emphasis here will be to explore the science of each issue and then to consider how that knowledge might be combined with perspectives from fields of the social sciences and humanities to implement public policies that promote environmental stewardship.

1220 Molecules to Humankind I (0 or 4 credits)

First class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors that examines the mechanisms that sustain life. Emphasis is placed on understanding the human body at the molecular, cellular, and physiological levels. In the fall quarter our discussions start with the atom and basic chemistry. We next consider the properties of complex molecules, including: DNA, proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids, in order to see how such molecules are used and organized by living organisms. Our discussions of large and complex molecules lead naturally to the basic unit of life, the cell.

1221 Molecules to Humankind II (0 or 4 credits)

Second class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors begins with an introduction to the general vertebrate body plan, we emphasize the human body plan but also compare it with other vertebrates. Discussions progress through the major organ and physiological systems of the body, including: circulatory, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, nervous, skin, immune, reproductive, gastrointestinal, and skeletal & muscle systems. Discussions concentrate on the organization and function of these systems.

1222 Molecules to Humankind III (0 or 4 credits)

Third class in a three-quarter sequence focuses for non-majors on cell biology, genetics, and human reproduction and development. After a review of cell structure and function, focusing on how cells are capable of replication with modification, the mechanisms by which information is passed on from one cell to another and from one generation to the next are considered. The second half of the quarter concerns sexual reproduction and early development.

1230 Origin & Evolution of Life I (0 or 4 credits)

The fall quarter of this three-quarter sequence for non-majors examines evolutionary theory, as formulated by Charles Darwin in the 19th century. Two themes are central, the means by which evolution comes about and the significance of evolution for understanding the origins of biological diversity. Lectures encourage student participation and diversity of viewpoints. Goals include understanding of science as a way of knowing and the application of science inquiry to current topics in fields of human concern. Labs include field trips to explore evolutionary theory through personal observations of regional geology and natural history.

1231 Origin & Evolution of Life II (0 or 4 credits)

The winter quarter is the second class this three-quarter sequence for non-majors that examines evolutionary theory in the light of 21st century knowledge of inheritance, including how traits are transmitted from parents to offspring and the role of DNA in shaping those traits. Other topics include the role of new molecular technologies in shaping the evolutionary future of the human species through cloning and genetic engineering. Goals follow from fall term about the nature and applications of science to areas of human concern, including the origin, diagnosis and treatment of human diseases.

1232 Origin & Evolution of Life III (0 or 4 credits)

This is the third quarter in the three-quarter sequence for non-majors that addresses current issues in evolution. It begins with a detailed analysis of 'intelligent design' creationism in order to see if the most recent version of the religious challenges to evolution offers anything new. It then looks at the way in which both new discoveries in the fossil record and new molecular approaches to evolution have converged to provide "proof beyond reasonable doubt" for a key evolutionary hypothesis concerning the origin of whales. The focus then switches to the evidence for the evolution of humans and the role of gene regulatory networks in explaining the origin of novel features. The course culminates with a critical look at the role of mass extinctions in evolution and the possibilities of an anthropogenic extinction episode occurring today.

1270 Human's Unseen Partners I (0 or 4 credits)

Students receive an introduction to the world of microbiology - the good, the bad and the ugly. With the help of the press and movie industry, most "human hosts" believe that microorganisms are to be feared, sterilized and/or destroyed. While this is true for a very small number of microbes, the majority is composed of essential and beneficial microorganisms that help the existence of all life on Earth. This first course in the sequence for non-majors is dedicated to raising the awareness of students to the value and need of our unseen partners. Laboratory included.

1271 Human's Unseen Partners II (0 or 4 credits)

For such a small size, microorganisms can have a large impact on our human world. This second course in the sequence for non-majors brings a new perspective to students on the role microorganisms, and their associated diseases, have played in turning the tide of war victories, immigration of a country, world politics and more. We tend to believe that humans alone can control their world but sometimes the mightiest of all are our unseen partners. Laboratory included. Prerequisite: BIOL 1270.

1272 Human's Unseen Partners III (0 or 4 credits)

In this last course in the sequence for non-majors, students are given an opportunity to challenge their beliefs and understandings of how life came to exist on Earth and the perspective of how humans are the most evolutionarily advanced. Students are guided through time on Earth and examine the development of life and the constant contribution of their unseen partners. Laboratory included. Prerequisite: BIOL 1271.

1990 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2010 General Ecology (0 or 4 credits)

Topics in ecosystems, population and community ecology, as well as behavioral ecology. Lectures are integrated with a combination of field, greenhouse, arboretum and laboratory lessons.

2050 Conservation Biology (0 or 4 credits)

Biological diversity explained, including endangered species small populations, habitat fragmentation and other causes of species extinction. Also preservation and management of biological diversity. Prerequisite: BIOL 1012.

2090 Biostatistics (4 credits)

Statistics in biological research. Computer-aided statistical analysis and hypothesis testing focusing on experiments and data unique to the biological sciences.

2120 Cell Structure and Function (4 credits)

Chemical composition of cells; structure and function of cell organelles; interrelationship of cellular unit with its environment; mechanisms of energy conversion within cells; functions of excitability, contractility and cell growth. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010/1011/1012 or BIOL 1220/1221/1222. Co-requisite: BIOL 2121 lab section.

2121 Cell Structure & Function Lab (1 credits)

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Co-requisite: BIOL 2120.

2200 Medical Terminology (3 credits)

This course presents fundamentals and applications of medical terminology using online learning modules and assessment. This review and application of human anatomy and physiology is suitable for students who have completed introductory biology (BIOL 1010 or its equivalent) and who are working toward a career in medicine or for whom communication with health care providers is essential. Students study basic anatomy and physiology at a level that is intermediate between introductory and advanced courses, discover the medical history behind medical terminology, analyze medical case studies, and work to develop skills for clear and concise articulation of the basic concepts of anatomy and physiology behind medical diagnosis and treatment. This mastery of medical terminology helps to build a strong foundation for advanced coursework in anatomy and physiology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1010 or equivalent with instructor approval.

2450 Human Anatomy (5 credits)

Detailed structural analysis of the tissues, organs and organ systems of the human body. Four lectures and one 3-hour laboratory each week.

2510 General Genetics (0 to 5 credits)

Mechanisms of heredity with application to all forms of life. One 3-hour laboratory per week. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010/1011/1012.

2600 Vertebrate Zoology I (4 credits)

Evolutionary history, morphology, physiology and ecology of fish, amphibians and reptiles.. Laboratory exercises focus on the structure and function of the vertebrate body, especially those of the skeletal, muscle and organ systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 1012 or permission of instructor.

2610 Vertebrate Zoology II (4 credits)

Evolutionary history, morphology, physiology and ecology of birds and mammals. Laboratory exercises focus on the structure and function of the vertebrate body, especially those of the skeletal, muscle and organ systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 1012 or permission of instructor.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3010 Evolution and Speciation (4 credits)

Theories and supporting evidence explaining evolution from origin of universe to complex interrelationships of species. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010/1011/1012.

3020 Aquatic Ecology (4 credits)

An introduction to the ecology of fresh-water and marine organisms including aquatic adaptations, community organization, food chains, nutrient cycling and man's impact on aquatic ecosystems. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 or instructor's permission.

3030 Alpine Ecology (4 credits)

Ecology of alpine and subalpine regions of Colorado; organization and distribution of communities and populations, succession, energy flow, nutrient cycling, population adaptations in life-history physiology, behavior and morphology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1010/ 1011/1012.

3055 Ecology of the Rockies (4 credits)

A week in residence at the Mt. Evans Field Station prior to the start of Fall Qtr includes field projects dealing with ecology and environmental issues. On campus classes involve data analysis and interpretation and formal scientific communication. Themes include terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, taxonomic groups ranging from conifer stands to aquatic insects and mountain goats. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010 or permission of instructor.

3060 Tropical Ecology (0 or 3 credits)

Biological composition of tropical ecosystems; biodiversity, biogeochemistry; causes and biological consequences of tropical deforestation; ecologically based approaches toward sustainable tropical forest use. Includes laboratory Prerequisite: BIOL 2010.

3070 Ecological Field Methods (4 credits)

Series of field exercises for students to learn principles and procedures of field methodology, data analysis and technical writing in ecology; problems drawn from population, community and ecosystem ecology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2010.

3090 Microbial Ecology (4 credits)

Interactions among microorganisms and their environment. Impact of ecological principles on microbial diseases, pollutant degradation, nutrient cycles and global change.

3100 Histology (4 credits)

Microscopic organization of tissues and organs; correlation of organization of organs with functions and pathologies; emphasis on mammalian systems. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 2120.

3110 Special Topics: Biology (1 to 5 credits)

Topics of special interest to teaching/research faculty of department presented as needed to complement and expand existing curriculum. May be repeated for credit.

3120 General Microbiology (0 or 4 credits)

Fundamental principles of microorganisms in the world and in disease; role of bacteria in biological phenomena. Includes laboratory. Prerequisite: BIOL 2120.

3130 Molecular Evolution (4 credits)

Evolution of macromolecules and reconstruction of evolutionary history of genes and organisms. Prerequisite: BIOL 2510.

3135 Topics in Cell Motility (4 credits)

Fibrous elements of the cytoskeleton and associated proteins and their role in cellular motility will be examined in detail. The physical forces involved in cellular motile function will be applied in understanding cellular motile behavior. Prerequisite: BIOL 2120.

3150 Intracellular Dynamics (4 credits)

Focuses on spatial and temporal control of intracellular processes with an emphasis on neuronal and endocrine cells. Topics include vesicular traffic, protein targeting, dynamics and spatial organization of signaling complexes. Emphasis on modern techniques of cell and molecular biology with examples from primary literature.

3160 Biophysics:Ion Channls&Disease (3 credits)

Examines ion channel structure and function and the ways in which this information provides insight into human disease. The focus is on the use of biophysical techniques in combination with molecular and genetic analysis of channel genes. (General Physics and BIOL 2120 are recommended.)

3200 Invertebrate Evolution (4 credits)

Introduction to remarkable diversity of invertebrate life, both in terms of numbers of species, novel body plan, and physiological adaptations. Includes laboratory. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010/1011/1012.

3250 Human Physiology (0 or 5 credits)

Functional relationships of human organ systems with coordinated laboratory activities and experiments that demonstrate and test physiological principles. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010/1011/1012.

3260 Nutrition (3 credits)

From physiological and biochemical perspectives, this course explores the relationships of energy metabolism, nutrients, vitamins and minerals to human health. Prerequisite: BIOL 3250

3300 Biodiversity-Flowering Plants (4 credits)

Basic techniques and principles of systematics with application to the origin, evolution, radiation, classification and biodiversity of flowering plants (angiosperms). Prerequisites: BIOL 1010/1011/1012 or GEOG 1201/1202/1203 or instructor’s permission.

3400 Ornithology (4 credits)

Biology of birds with emphasis on ecology and behavior; field and laboratory work to stress bird identification and ecological relationships of birds. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010/1011/1012.

3410 Animal Behavior (4 credits)

Diversity of animal behaviors and how they enable animals to live in the natural world; the structure, control, and function of behaviors, and some of the factors that shape behaviors.

3560 Molecular Biology Laboratory (0 or 4 credits)

Laboratory based course that covers techniques in gene excision, cloning and reinsertion and gene sequencing. Prerequisite: BIOL 2560.

3570 Proteins in Biological Systems (3 credits)

Proteins considered in their biological setting; protein synthesis and degradation; survey of protein functions in vivo; evolution of proteins; introduction to protein biotechnology. Prerequisites: BIOL 2120, CHEM 2451, CHEM 2452 and CHEM 2453.

3610 Developmental Biology (4 credits)

Processes and mechanisms of development, exemplified by higher animal embryogenesis, with consideration of microbial model systems. Prerequisite: BIOL 2510.

3620 Vertebrate Embryology (4 credits)

Development processes in placental mammals; analysis of vertebrate cyto-differentiation and morphogenesis. Laboratory on embryonic anatomy of amphibians, birds and mammals. Prerequisites: BIOL 1011 and BIOL 2120.

3630 Development of Tissue Shape (4 credits)

Every organism has a stereotypical shape, but how does this shape arise? This course examines the cellular and molecular mechanisms that direct the forming of body and tissue shape. Prerequisite: BIOL 2120.

3640 Introductory Neurobiology (4 credits)

Organization and function of vertebrate central nervous system; nature of action potential, biochemistry of neurotransmitters, neuropeptides, functional anatomy of nervous system, phylogeny of nervous system. Prerequisite: BIOL 2120.

3641 Systems Neuroscience (4 credits)

Structure and function of the brain and spinal cord, emphasis on functional systems including sensory perception, motor control and consciousness. Prerequisite: BIOL 3640.

3642 Neuropharmacology (4 credits)

How psychoactive drugs exert their effects on the nervous system; drugs of abuse and drugs used in the treatment of psychotic and neurodegenerative disorders. Prerequisite: BIOL 3640.

3643 Developmental Neurobiology (4 credits)

This course investigates the mechanisms involved in the maturation of neurons, and signals that direct neurons to their proper position in the central nervous system. Prerequisites: BIOL 3640, BIOL 3641.

3644 Neuromuscular Pathophysiology (4 credits)

Cellular and molecular basis for normal nerve and muscle functions and the alteration of these functions by toxins, trauma and diseases of the brain, nerves and muscles; how specific insults produce clinical symptoms and pathology. Prerequisite: BIOL 2120. Recommended: BIOL 3640 or BIOL 3250.

3646 Seminar:Cognitive Neuroscience (2 credits)

This seminar is the capstone course for the neuroscience portion of the cognitive neuroscience program. Seminar topics will include but are not limited to: neurological disorders, model systems in neuroscience, sensory systems.

3650 Endocrinology (4 credits)

Mechanisms of hormone action, evolution of vertebrate endocrine systems, analysis of function integration of hormonal responses in maintenance of homeostasis. Prerequisite: BIOL 2120.

3655 Molecular Neuroendocrinology (4 credits)

Advanced laboratory course that uses anatomical/immunological, biochemical and molecular approaches to analyze neuroendocrine pathways in the hypothalamus/pituitary system. Prerequisites: BIOL 3650 and instructor's permission.

3670 Molecular Immunology (4 credits)

Organs, cells and molecules that underlie mammalian immune response; relationship of immune system to disease. Prerequisite: BIOL 2510.

3680 Adv Techniques in Cell Biology (4 credits)

Advanced laboratory course that covers current techniques used in cell biology research. Prerequisite: BIOL 2120

3700 Topics in Ecology (1 to 4 credits)

Topics vary; may include plant, animal, biochemical, alpine or aquatic; one topic per quarter. May be repeated for credit. Taught from original literature. Prerequisite: one quarter of undergraduate ecology and/or instructor's permission.

3701 Topics in Genetics (1 to 4 credits)

Topics vary; may include genetic methods, molecular genetics, human genetics, chromosomes or population genetics; one topic per quarter. May be repeated for credit. Taught from original literature. Prerequisite: BIOL 2510 and/or instructor's permission.

3702 Topics in Regulatory Biology (1 to 4 credits)

Topics vary; may include endocrinology, physiology or immunology; one topic per quarter. May be repeated for credit. Taught from original literature. Prerequisite: varies with topic and instructor; instructor's permission usually required.

3703 Topics Developmental Biology (1 to 4 credits)

Topics vary; may include gene expression in development, developmental immunogenetics, developmental biochemistry or aging; one topic per quarter. May be repeated for credit. Taught from original literature. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

3704 Topics in Cell Biology (1 to 4 credits)

Topics vary; may include supramolecular structure, microscopy, membranes and techniques. May be repeated for credit. Taught from original literature. Prerequisites: varies with course and instructor; instructor's permission usually required.

3705 Topics in Molecular Biology (1 to 4 credits)

Topics vary; may include biochemistry, supramolecular structure and function, molecular genetics, membrane biology. May be taken more than once for credit. Taught from original literature. Prerequisites: varies with course and instructor; instructor's permission usually required.

3706 Topics in Evolution (1 to 4 credits)

Topics vary, but may include molecular evolution, plant evolution and animal evolution. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

3707 Topics in Conservation Biology (1 to 4 credits)

 

3800 Human Molecular Biology (4 credits)

Molecular basis of heredity and genetic control, using in-vitro systems and microbial and eukaryotic models; molecular basis of heredity and genetic regulation considering in-vitro systems as well as prokaryotic and eukaryotic models. Prerequisite: BIOL 2510.

3910 Virus & Infectious Human Dis (3 credits)

Organization of viruses at the molecular level with consideration of diseases that these agents cause in humans. The mechanism of action of viruses is a major theme of the course. Prerequisite: BIOL 3800.

3950 Undergraduate Research (1 to 10 credits)

Participation in faculty research programs by agreement between student and faculty member. Maximum of 5 quarter hours of BIOL 3950 and/or BIOL 3991 may be applied to the 45-quarter-hour requirement for a major in biological sciences.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

Topic in biology studied under faculty supervision. Student's responsibility to identify faculty supervisor before registering for class. Maximum of 5 quarter hours of BIOL 3991 and/or BIOL 3950 may be applied toward the 45-quarter-hour requirement for a major in biological sciences.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

4010 Cellular Motile Function (2 credits)

Current literature in area of cell motility; role of cytoskeletal elements as motile agents.

4020 Microbial Genetic Model Syst (2 credits)

 

4030 Current Concepts in Evolution (2 credits)

New ideas and theories in field of evolutionary biology.

4040 Current Concepts-Animal Phys (2 credits)

Selected topics in animal physiology.

4050 Topics in Plant Biology (2 credits)

Varying topics; areas of plant-animal interactions, co-evolution, plant ecology, plant biochemistry/physiology.

4060 Gene Expression-Development (2 credits)

Varying aspects of gene control in developing systems, a different apsect each time course is offered.

4070 Hormone-Receptor Interaction (2 credits)

Series of lectures; understanding molecular, cellular basis of hormone action; experimental analysis of binding of hormones with their receptors; structure-function relationships of hormone-receptor interactions; nature and action of mediators generated by hormone-receptor interaction.

4080 Biological Membranes (2 credits)

 

4085 Accelerated Biostatistics (2 credits)

This is an accelerated online statistics course for graduate students in Biology. Basic probability and hypothesis testing is the foundation of teaching applied statistics, including simple statistics (t-tests, F-tests, and chi square) and more advanced procedures (regression, correlation, analysis of variance). In addition, students learn more complex tools (multiple regression, multi-classification ANOVA, Student-Newman-Keuls tests), including non-parametric Tests (Mann-Whitney U, Sign test, Wilcoxon Rank Sum).

4090 Biostatistics (4 credits)

Statistic on biological research; emphasis on procedures, applications of regression, correlation, analysis of variance, and nonparametric tests. Include instruction on computeraided (Mac and PC) statistical analysis and presentation of results.

4091 Research Methods (1 credits)

This course builds upon the concepts in BIOL 4090, Biostatistics, by covering in more detail and specificity issues involved in designing one's experiment to adequately test the hypotheses or describe the data of interest. Students bring and discuss their specific research projects as case studies to maximize the utility of the course.

4100 Microbial Structure & Function (2 credits)

 

4110 Essentials of Immunology (2 credits)

 

4120 Hmn Chromosomes & Mutagenesis (2 credits)

 

4130 Microevolution (2 credits)

Microevolution, the change of gene frequencies within populations; examination of forces that cause it, evaluation of its contribution to process of speciation.

4140 Protein Biosynthesis (2 credits)

Processes of protein synthesis in cells; emphasis on posttranslational modicfications that occur to secretory proteins prior to secretion.

4150 Special Topics in Adv Biology (1 to 4 credits)

Topics of special interests to teaching and research faculty presented as needed to complement and expand existing curriculum. May be taken morethen once for credit.

4190 Biometry (3 credits)

 

4210 Grad Sem: Cell Biology (2 credits)

A series of student presentations fousing on varied topics involving cell biology. May be taken more than once for credit.

4211 Advanced Cell Biology (3 credits)

Students study the subcellular structure and organization of the cell. Organelle structure and function are examined in detail as well as biogenesis and degradation (turnover) of these subcellular structures. Cytoskeltal dynamics are also a major focus. Specific topics covered include cell division, macromolecular synthesis, membrane transport, cell-matrix and cell-cell communication, cell migration, cell differentiation, and mechanisms of cell death. The course follows a lecture format in conjunction with selected journal article presentations and discussions by the students.

4212 Advanced Molecular Biology (3 credits)

This course focuses on a detailed analysis of regulated gene expression. The topics include lectures and readings of relevant literature in areas covering gene regulation at multiple steps, including transcription, RNA processing, and translation. In particular, the logic of experimental design and data analysis are emphasized.

4213 Advanced Cell Signaling (3 credits)

Students in this course investigate a large array of cellular signal transduction cascades. Specific signaling pathways to be covered include growth factor receptors, cytokine receptors, steroid receptors, integrin-extracellular matrix, heterotrimeric G-protein coupled receptors, monomeric G-proteins, transcription factors, lipids, cytoskeleton, cell cycle, and apoptosis. Each of these topics is examined in the context of normal cell physiology as well as their roles in specific disease processes. The course follows a lecture format in conjunction with selected journal article presentations and discussions by the students.

4220 Grad Sem: Ecology & Evolution (2 credits)

A series of student presentations focusing on varied topics involving ecology and evolution. May be taken more than once for credit.

4230 Grad Sem: Molecular Biology (2 credits)

A series of student presentations focusing on varied topics invoving ecology and evolution. May be taken more than once for credit.

4231 Responsible Conduct in Rsrch (1 credits)

This course covers several topics regarding guidelines for ethical practices in research. Topics include: data ownership, conflict of interest and commitments, human subjects, animal welfare, research misconduct, authorship, mentoring, peer review, and collaboration. The course includes an online training component and meets one hour each week to discuss these topics.

4300 Fall Graduate Reviews in Biol (1 credits)

Students will participate in a required review session that precedes selected departmental seminar presentations by faculty and outside speakers, and will participate in a discussion session with the seminar speaker.

4301 Wntr Graduate Reviews in Biol (1 credits)

Students will participate in a required review session that precedes selected departmental seminar presentations by faculty and outside speakers, and will participate in a discussion session with the seminar speaker.

4302 Sprg Graduate Reviews in Biol (1 credits)

Students will participate in a required review session that precedes selected departmental seminar presentations by faculty and outside speakers, and will participate in a discussion session with the seminar speaker.

4303 Reviews in Biology (1 credits)

The experience is built around the departmental seminar series offered every quarter.

4310 Foundations: Cell & Molecular (2 credits)

Students participate in a weekly discussion group that focuses on recent papers from the primary literature in Cell and Molecular Biology.

4311 Wntr Selected Top: Reg Bio (2 credits)

Students will participate in a weekly discussion group that will focus on recent papers from the primary literature in regulatory biology.

4312 Sprg Selected Top: Reg Bio (2 credits)

Students will participate in a weekly discussion group that will focus on recent papers from the primary literature in regulatory biology.

4320 Selected Tpc: Molecular Biol (2 credits)

The syllabus for the Selected Topics series will vary each quarter. Each quarter a faculty member will set the theme for the quarter and identify a set of review articles to introduce the topic. The instructor will lead the first session and provide important background material on the topic. Students will select a paper from the primary literature to present to the class on the topic designated for the quarter.

4321 Selected Tpc: Molecular Biol (2 credits)

The syllabus for the Selected Topics series will vary each quarter. Each quarter a faculty member will set the theme for the quarter and identify a set of review articles to introduce the topic. The instructor will lead the first session and provide important background material on the topic. Students will select a paper from the primary literature to present to the class on the topic designated for the quarter.

4322 Selected Tpcs: Molecular Biol (2 credits)

The syllabus for the Selected Topics series will vary each quarter. Each quarter a faculty member will set the theme for the quarter and identify a set of review articles to introduce the topic. The instructor will lead the first session and provide important background material on the topic. Students will select a paper from the primary literature to present to the class on the topic designated for the quarter.

4330 Foundations: Ecology I (2 credits)

Students participate in a weekly discuss group that focuses on recent papers from the primary literature in Biodiversity, Ecology, and Evolution.

4331 Foundations: Ecology II (2 credits)

Students participate in a weekly discussion group that focuses on recent papers from the primary literature in Biodiversity, Ecology, and Evolution.

4332 Foundations: Ecology III (2 credits)

Students participate in a weekly discussion group that focuses on recent papers from the primary literature in Biodiversity, Ecology, and Evolution.

4440 Current Concepts-Animal Phys (2 credits)

 

4610 Developmental Biology (4 credits)

The processess and mechanisms of development, exemplified by higher animal embryogenesis, with consideration of simipler model systems. Laboratory sessions use live materails; course finishes with individual projects. Prerequisite(s): BIOL 2510 or equivalent

4700 Human Molecular Biology (4 credits)

Molecular basis of heredity and genetic control, using in-vitro systems and microbial and eukaryotic models; molecular basis of heredity and genetic regulation considering in-vitro systems as well as prokaryotic and eukaryotic models. Restricted to MBA Bioenterprize students.

4710 Endocrinology (4 credits)

Mechanisms of hormone action, evolution of vertebrate endocrine systems, analysis of function integration of hormonal responses in maintenance of homeostasis. Restricted to MBA Bioenterprize students.

4720 Neuropharmacology (4 credits)

How psychoactive drugs exert their effects on the nervous system; drugs of abuse and drugs used in the treatment of psychotic and neurodegenerative disorders. Restricted to MBA Bioenterprize students.

4730 Molecular Lab Techniques (4 credits)

Techniques in gene excision, cloning and reinsertion; gene sequencing. Restricted to MBA Bioenterprize students.

4731 Cell and Molecular Techniques (4 credits)

Analysis of neuroendocrine systems using a multidisciplinary approach. Anatomical/immunological, biochemical and molecular approaches used to analyze neuroendocrine pathways in the hypothalamus/pituitary system. Restricted to MBA Bioenterprize students.

4740 Microbiology (4 credits)

Fundamental principles; role of bacteriology in biological phenomena. Includes laboratory. Restricted to MBA Bioenterprize students.

4750 Immunology (4 credits)

Organs, cells and molecules that underlie mammalian immune response; relationship of immune system to disease. Restricted to MBA Bioenterprize students.

4760 Advanced Cell Biology (4 credits)

Focuses on spatial and temporal control of intracellular processes with an emphasis on neuronal and endocrine cells. Topics include vesicular traffic, protein targeting, dynamics and spatial organization of signaling complexes. Emphasis on modern techniques of cell and molecular biology with examples from primary literature. Restricted to MBA Bioenterprize students.

4850 Forensic Serology Laboratory (5 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with two major educational skills. First, is a thorough understanding of the fundamental science behind the identification and serological analysis of biological evidence in a forensic context. Second, is a rigorously developed set of practical hands-on proficiencies with the major commercial assay systems used by forensic laboratories for the identification of blood, saliva, semen, and other biological material with potential probative value to a criminal investigation.

4860 Forensic Genetics Laboratory (4 credits)

This course is designed to provide students with two major educational skills. First, is a thorough understanding of the fundamental science behind the molecular genetic analysis of biological evidence in a forensic context. Second, is a rigorously developed set of practical hands-on proficiencies with the major commercial assay systems and software used by forensic laboratories for the determination and analysis of DNA profiles.

4991 Independent Study (1 to 17 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 17 credits)

 

5991 Independent Study (1 to 17 credits)

 

5995 Independent Research PhD (1 to 18 credits)

 


Chemistry
1001 Science of Contemporary Iss I (0 or 4 credits)

First class in a three-quarter sequence that draws from chemistry, biochemistry, materials and the environment. The goal of the course is to provide a vehicle to help the student achieve some degree of scientific literacy. It begins with atoms, chemical bonds molecules and eventually leads into larger, more biological molecules and polymers. The Fall Quarter covers topics such as dirt, diamonds and salt using the concepts of how atoms interact as ions, acids and bases; the nature of chemical bonds and the structure of organic molecules. Examples will cover topics as varied as minerals and nutrition, soaps, artificial joints, storage batteries, vinegar and buckyballs.

1002 Science of Contemporary Iss II (0 or 4 credits)

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that draws from chemistry, biochemistry, materials and the environment. The Winter Quarter covers topics such as fuel combustion, explosives, air, water, and sunshine, and scum on the pond using concepts of nitrogen fixation, functional groups and chemical reactions. Grocery chemistry emphasizing carbohydrate and fat metabolism (fat conversion and storage, trans fats), formation and reactions of proteins. And, in addition the gaseous atmosphere (greenhouse effect), photochemical reactions (air pollution), light absorption and color (dyes) will be discussed.

1003 Science of Contemporary IssIII (0 or 4 credits)

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that draws from chemistry, biochemistry, materials and the environment. The Spring Quarter deals with the impact of chemicals both within and upon biological systems. The emphasis is on both biological and chemical topics such as hereditary materials (nucleic acids, genetic engineering), natural polymers, drugs (design and benefit; broccoli, morphine) and forensic science.

1010 General Chemistry (0 or 3 credits)

For natural science and engineering majors. Atomic and molecular structure, reactions in solution, thermochemistry and thermodynamics. Co-requisite: CHEM 1240.

1240 General Chemistry Lab (1 credits)

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 1010. Experiments illustrate aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and thermodynamics. Co-requisite: CHEM 1010.

1610 Chemistry for Engineers (3 credits)

Lecture course for engineering majors and other science majors with strong background in chemistry. Topics covered include atomic and molecular structure, reactions in solution, themochemistry and thermodynamics, electrochemistry and intermolecular forces. Co-requisite: CHEM 1240. Prerequisite: MATH 1951.

1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2011 Analysis Equilibrium Systems (3 credits)

Chemical equilibria, starting from simple examples and extending to complex systems, including salt solutions, acids and bases, and metal comple formation. Prerequisites: CHEM 1010 and 1240. Co-requisite: CHEM 2041.

2041 Analysis Equilibrium Sys Lab (1 credits)

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 2011. Experiments illustrate equilibrium principles applied to acids/bases, salts and metal complexes, and methods for analysis. Prerequisites: CHEM 1010 and 1240. Co-requisite: CHEM 2011.

2131 Chemistry of the Elements (3 credits)

Descriptive chemistry of main group and transition elements including redox and coordination chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 2011 and 2041. Corequisite: CHEM 2141.

2141 Chemistry of the Elements Lab (1 credits)

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 2131. Study of reactions of main group and transition elements including redox and coordination chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 2011 and 2041. Corequisite: CHEM 2131.

2451 Organic Chemistry I (3 credits)

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. Prerequisites: CHEM 1010 and 1240. Co-requisite: CHEM 2461.

2452 Organic Chemistry II (3 credits)

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. Prerequisite: CHEM 2451. Co-requisite: CHEM 2462.

2453 Organic Chemistry III (3 credits)

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. Prerequisite: CHEM 2452. Co-requisite: CHEM 2463.

2461 Organic Chemistry Lab I (1 credits)

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Co-requisite: CHEM 2451.

2462 Organic Chemistry Lab II (1 credits)

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Co-requisite: CHEM 2452.

2463 Organic Chemistry Lab III (1 credits)

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Co-requisite: CHEM 2453.

2701 Topics in Chemistry (1 to 4 credits)

Topical course changes with subject matter. Restricted to sophomore level students or above.

2900 Careers in Chem & Biochemistry (1 or 2 credits)

This course is designed to give students in the natural and physical sciences total exposure to opportunities after graduation. This will encompass graduate schools, professional school, industry, education and government.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3110 Chemical Systems I (3 credits)

Advanced discussion of modern concepts of organic chemistry; bonding, stereochemistry, reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: CHEM 2453 and equivalent of one year of physical chemistry.

3120 Chemical Systems II (3 credits)

Interpretation of trends in the chemistry of the elements in terms of orbital interactions. Most examples will be taken from the third transition metals and the boron and carbon groups. Prerequisites: CHEM 2131, 3310 and CHEM 3110.

3130 Chemical Systems III (3 credits)

Advanced-level physical biochemistry course intended for advanced-level undergraduates and graduate students. Focuses on kinetic, thermodynamic and dynamic aspects of biopolymers; delineates the relationship of these properties to the mechanism and function of biological macromolecules. Prerequisites: CHEM 3811, 3812, 3813, CHEM 3610 or the equivalent.

3210 Instrumental Analysis (0 or 4 credits)

Course focus is toward students' understanding of instrumental components and the theory behind both component's and instrument's operation. Emphasis is on techniques such as spectroscopy and chromatography. Students will experience extensive hands-on use of a number of instruments. Course provides a strong background for Chemistry Frontiers (CHEM 3500) and emphasizes techniques and skills sought by chemical and biotechnology industries. Prerequisites: CHEM 2011 and 2041.

3220 Advanced Analytical Chemistry (3 credits)

Principles of chemical instrumentation applied to analytical measurements; principles, instrumentation and applications of spectrometric and chromatographic measurements. Prerequisites: CHEM 2011 and 3621.

3310 Structure and Energetics I (3 credits)

Fundamentals of quantum chemistry, and introduction to symmetry and molecular structure of small and large systems. Prerequisite: one year of physical chemistry.

3320 Structure and Energetics II (3 credits)

Computational methods in chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 3310, one year of physical chemistry.

3410 Atmospheric Chemistry (3 credits)

The concepts of equilibrium thermodynamics, kinetics, and photochemistry will be applied to understanding atmospheric processes. Covers urban air pollution in detail with focus on primary pollutants. Also covers stratospheric chemistry with focus on ozone chemistry and the chemistry of climate change. Prerequisites: CHEM 2011, 2041, 2131, 2453, and 2463.

3411 Aquatic Chemistry (3 credits)

The circulation of the oceans and their chemical make-up. 'Classical water pollution problems' like biological oxygen demand and turbidity are discussed. Also presented: aquifer structure and flow, ground water chemistry, pollutant partitioning between stationary and mobile phases, heterogeneous surface chemistry, and the detection of trace contaminants. Prerequisites: CHEM 2011, 2041, 2131, 2453, 2463 or instructor's permission.

3412 Environmental Chem& Toxicology (3 credits)

A survey of environmental toxicology concepts: animal testing, dose-response data, epidemiology, risk assessment. The course includes ecotoxicology, focusing on the alteration of biological and chemical systems beyond the simple response of an individual to an environmental chemical. Prerequisites: CHEM 2011, 2041, 2131, 2453, 2463 or instructor's permission.

3500 Chemistry Frontiers (3 credits)

Advanced-level laboratory course required for all undergraduates majoring in chemistry or biochemistry. Emphasis on the development of oral, written, computer and presentation skills necessary for success as a scientist. Skills will be honed through state-of-the-art laboratory experiences from diverse areas of chemistry. Prerequisites: CHEM 3210 and 3610.

3610 Physical Chemistry I (3 credits)

Fundamentals of thermodynamics, including phase and reaction equilibria, properties of solutions, and electrochemistry needed for advanced study in life sciences and for Physical Chemistry II and III. May be taken for graduate credit by nonchemistry majors. Prerequisites: CHEM 2011, calculus and physics.

3620 Physical Chemistry II (3 credits)

Fundamentals of quantum chemistry, including theories of atomic and molecular structure and spectroscopy. May be taken for graduate credit by nonchemistry majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 3610.

3621 Physical Chemistry III (3 credits)

Fundamentals of kinetic theory and statistical mechanics. May be taken for graduate credit by nonchemistry majors. Prerequisite: CHEM 3620.

3701 Topics in Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)

May include bioinorganic chemistry, organometallic chemistry, ligand field theory or magnetic resonance studies. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 3621 and 3121 and others depending on topic.

3702 Topics in Analytical Chemistry (3 credits)

Topics of special or current interest; recent examples include chromatographic methods of analysis, analytical spectroscopy, and design of analog and digital instrumentation. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 2011 and 3220 and others depending on topic.

3703 Topics in Organic Chemistry (3 credits)

May include organic photochemistry, organic synthesis, organic electrochemistry or natural products. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 2453 or equivalent and others depending on topic.

3704 Topics in Physical Chemistry (3 credits)

May include chemical kinetics, photochemistry, or theoretical chemistry. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 3621 and others depending on topic.

3705 Topics in Biochemistry (3 or 4 credits)

May include physical techniques for exploring biological structure, biological catalysis, and selected fields within biochemistry taught from original literature. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: CHEM 3811, 3812, 3813.

3811 Biochemistry-Proteins (3 credits)

Protein structure and function, starting with the building blocks and forces that drive the formation of protein structure and the basic concepts of protein structure, and continuing with enzyme catalysis, kinetics, and regulation. Prerequisites: CHEM 2453 and 2011, or Instructor Permission.

3812 Biochemistry-Membranes/Metab (3 credits)

Membranes and membrane mediated cellular processes, energy and signal transduction, and metabolic/biosynthetic pathways. Prerequisite: CHEM 3811.

3813 Biochemistry-Nucleic Acids (3 credits)

Molecular processes underlying heredity, gene expression and gene regulation in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Prerequisite: CHEM 2453.

3820 Biochemistry Lab (3 credits)

Purification and properties of biological molecules and structures. Prerequisite: CHEM 3811.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

May be repeated for credit.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3995 Research in Chemistry (1 to 10 credits)

Research project conducted under guidance of a faculty member. Credit hours and projects arranged on an individual basis. May be repeated for credit.

4100 Adv Topics:Inorganic Chemistry (3 credits)

Selected topics, including material from current literature. May be taken for credit more than once.

4200 Adv Topics: Analytical Chem (3 credits)

In-depth coverage of selected topics such as atmospheric chemistry, selected spectroscopic or other techniques. May be taken for credit more than once.

4400 Adv. Topics: Organic Chemistry (3 credits)

Physical organic chemistry; reaction mechanisms, structure reactivity relationships, kinetics, photochemistry, molecular orbital theory, etc.; current literature. May be taken for credit more than once.

4600 Adv Topics: Physical Chemistry (3 credits)

Spectroscopy, theoretical chemistry, solid state, electrochemistry and catalysis, etc.; current literature. May be taken for credit more than once.

4800 Advanced Topics: Biochemistry (3 credits)

Current literature in an area of particular interest, e.g., biosynthesis of macromolecules or biochemical genetics; one topic each quarter selected to meet needs of advanced students. May be taken for credit more than once if the topic material is different. Prerequisites: CHEM 3811 and CHEM 3812.

4900 Chemistry Seminar (1 credits)

A weekly presentations of research in progress and of current literature by outside speakers. faculty and graduate students.

4991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

5991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

5995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 


Environmental Science
2660 Envi Hist Sonora & Baja Mexico (5 credits)

Geography and ecology of desert southwest emphasizing Mexican states of Sonora, Baja California del Sur and Baja California. Traveling by van and lodging in tents, trip covers 3,500 miles, offers hands-on experience with principles and problems of physical geography and ecology in desert environments. Offered only during Interterm.

2801 Water Quality of the West (2 or 4 credits)

This course covers the physical, chemical, and biological aspects of water quality of Colorado Rivers and streams. Impacts from human activities, including mining and agriculture are evaluated. Significant time is spent assessing the water quality of surface and ground waters by completing a course-long project that evaluates the water quality of three surface rivers/streams near the University of Denver: Sand Creek, Clear Creek, and the headwaters of the Arkansas River. The course is an integrate lab/lecture course with significant time spent in the field collecting data. Prerequisite: GEOG 1203 or CHEM 1010.

2900 Environmental Science Seminar (1 credits)

 

2950 Topics in Env. Science (1 to 4 credits)

An in-depth coverage of a specific environmental issue, topic, or problem. Topics vary with instructor.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3000 Environmental Law (4 credits)

Purpose and applications of federal laws pertaining to environmental protection, including NEPA, RCRA, CERCLA, and Clean Water and Clean Air Acts; addresses role of states in implementation of federal environmental laws.

3200 Solid & Hazardous Waste Mgmt (4 credits)

Legislative, practical and technological aspects of solid and hazardous waste management; evolution of waste management regulations over past 15 years provides background for considering management of waste stream, cleanup and disposal options.

3270 Environmental Impact Assmnt (4 credits)

The impact of the human species on environmental systems; the methods of analyzing the impacts and the legal aspects of minimizing them. Each quarter a different broad area is considered, such as the effects of large industries on ecosystems, the effects of environmental pollution on human health, or the biological problems of managing toxic waste. Each quarter may be taken independently of the others. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010, 1011, 1012 or GEOG 1201, 1202, 1203.

3550 Environmental Issues-Colorado (4 credits)

This course focuses on the identification, analysis and mitigation of landscape-scale environmental issues or concerns, using watersheds as units of study. Emphasis is on field data collection and analysis to answer specific questions or address particular problems.

3660 Geog & Ecology of Costa Rica (4 credits)

Geography and ecology of the rain forest. Students travel to Costa Rica to gain hands-on experience in studying the rain forest environment.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

Study of a topic not covered in existing course offerings. May be used for work completed in off-campus internships that focus primarily on the mastery of existing knowledge.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3995 Undergraduate Research (1 to 5 credits)

Original research in environmental science topic under sponsorship of a faculty member; applicable to studies that focus primarily on discovery of new knowledge through application of scientific method.

3999 Environmental Sci. Internship (1 to 5 credits)

Supervised internship in a state, local, or federal office or in the private sector. Prerequisites: 15 quarter hours in the Environmental Science major and approval of supervising faculty. Maximum of 5 quarter hours total.


Geography
1030 Phys Geog Natural Regions U.S. (4 credits)

Identification, description, and explanation of landform regions of the United States; associations of landforms, structures, and processes. Includes laboratory.

1200 World Regional Geography (4 credits)

Regional comparative studies of physical and human environments; interplay of forces that give each area its unique character.

1201 Environmental Systems: Weather (0 or 4 credits)

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, an basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate.

1202 Env. Systems: Hydrology (0 or 4 credits)

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included.

1203 Env. Systems: Landforms (0 or 4 credits)

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography.

1216 Our Dynamic Earth I (0 or 4 credits)

This is the first quarter of a three-quarter sequence devoted to studying natural hazards and their impacts on society. Natural processes become hazards when they have the potential to have an adverse affect on humans and their property, or the natural environment. This first quarter of the sequence introduces students to the physical processes associated with atmospheric natural hazards (tornados, hurricanes, severe storms) and their societal impacts.

1217 Our Dynamic Earth II (0 or 4 credits)

This is the second quarter of a three-quarter sequence devoted to studying natural hazards and their impacts on society. In this course, students investigate the physical processes that result in geologic natural hazards (earthquakes, landslides, volcanoes) and their societal impacts.

1218 Our Dynamic Earth III (0 or 4 credits)

This is the third quarter of a three-quarter sequence devoted to studying natural hazards and their impacts on society. In this course, students investigate the physical processes that result in hydrologic natural hazards (floods, drought, tsunamis) and their societal impacts.

1264 Global Environmental Change I (0 or 4 credits)

First class in a three-quarter sequence for honors students. This course examines the processes and drivers of global environmental change and its consequences for humans and the environment.

1265 Global Environmental Change II (0 or 4 credits)

Second class in a three-quarter sequence for honors students. This course examines the processes and drivers of global environmental change and its consequences for humans and the environment.

1266 Global Environmental ChangeIII (0 or 4 credits)

Third class in a three-quarter sequence for honors students. This course examines the processes and drivers of global environmental change and its consequences for humans and the environment.

1410 People, Places & Landscapes (4 credits)

In this course, students will study the location of people and activities across the surface of the Earth. Describing the locations and patterns of human activity only lays the foundation for exploring how and why such patterns and have developed historically, and how they relate to the natural environment and other aspects of human behavior.

1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2000 Geographic Statistics (4 credits)

An introduction to statistics primarily for Geography and Environmental Science students focusing on the scientific method, the nature of data, descriptive statistics, and analytical or inferential statistics.

2010 Map Reading-Use and Analysis (4 credits)

The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the basics of map reading and interpretation. Basic map components will be introduced along with additional spatial and geographic concepts including cartographic communication, map projections and map scale, coordinate systems, and the nature of spatial data. In addition, the course looks at how maps can be used to communicate information in a variety of ways. From professionally prepared cartographic data to maps appearing almost daily in newspapers and magazines, a variety of map sources and types are used to illustrate how maps can speak a language of their own.

2020 Computer Cartography (4 credits)

Basic map design and execution using existing maps. Topics include: map projections, symbolizing quantitative data, use of space, layout, compilation, verbal content, and the use o computer technology in design and production of maps.

2030 Field Methods (4 credits)

Part l, outdoor instruction in use of Brunton compass, level, plane table, and alidade; Part 2, data-gathering techniques and preparation for field work in urban problems.

2100 Intro Geog Info Systems (GIS) (4 credits)

Overview of GIS, including background, development, trends, and prospects in this technological field; software package and hands-on exercises used to examine basic geographic concepts and spatial data characteristics associated with automated mapping, projections, scales, geocoding, coordinate referencing, and data structures for computerized land-based data bases.

2200 Air Photo Interpretation (3 credits)

Analysis of aerial photos for purpose of deriving useful information; applications to study of physical and cultural environments. Prerequisite: introductory course in geography.

2300 Cultural Geography (4 credits)

Themes and methods of cultural geography including cultural area, landscape, history and ecology.

2310 Polit Ecol Nat Rsrcs-Guatemala (4 credits)

This class, through the lens of political ecology and action-oriented research, introduces students to the extremes of Guatemala and how one of the most unequal societies in the West has evolved over the past 500 years. With a firm understanding of Guatemala's social reality we then conduct initial community-based research with several communities in the highlands and lowland return refugee frontier communities with the goal of identifying the best options for sourcing and then providing potable water and/or other vital resources. The class also introduces students to field methods in cultural geography and then how to apply them in field in international settings.

2401 The Human Population (4 credits)

This course covers the fundamental concepts of demography with an emphasis on its relevance to inquiry in disciplines including economics, business, geography, environmental science, political science and sociology.

2410 Economic Geography (4 credits)

Economic elements as spatially arranged, distribution of economic activities on the earth's surface; market, resource and transportation factors in location theory.

2418 Environmental Challenges (4 credits)

Environmental issues are the sources of considerable controversy at local, regional, national, and global geographic scales. These issues include social, political, economic, and scientific dimensions. The "facts" supporting various perspectives of positions range from pure propaganda, to unsubstantiated opinion, to interpretations of data collected according to high scientific standards. Students will examine many of today's environmental conundrums by looking at various positions, and sometimes, controversial writings on selected environmental topics and will learn to analyze complex, multi-dimensional issues, such as those pertaining to the environment and human interactions with the environment. Students may be forced to confront their own pre-conceptions concerning environmental issues and perhaps even change their views.

2419 Great American Cities (4 credits)

The purpose of this course is to examine the American City in the last 100 years. In the year 2000, 75% of the U.S. population lived in urban areas; debatable as a proper definition of an 'urban area' might be, what is not debatable is the growing influence of cities on our everyday life: politics, power, knowledge, business, the arts, poverty, crime, pollution, sports, etc, etc, etc, - the list goes on. Irrespective of our feelings about cities, they remain an essential component of our national fabric, and therefore a necessary area of study. In this class, we discuss the historical factors that lead to the growth of cities, the modern city, governments, taxes, economics, urban planning, housing, urban decay, gentrification, immigration, and education.

2420 Geography of Tourism (4 credits)

Major cultural and environmental motivations for tourism; major tourism flow patterns; and predominant domestic and international touristic regions.

2430 World Cities (4 credits)

The study of world cities from a geographical perspective emphasizes the following general topics: 1) worldwide urbanization and globalization processes; 2) the study of cities as nodes within global, regional, and national urban systems; 3) the internal spatial structure of land uses within cities; 4) the spatial dimensions of economic, social, political, and cultural processes in cities; and 5) environmental elements, involving human interrelationships with the natural environment in an urban setting. Urban patterns and processes are examined in each of the world's major regions, including in-depth analysis of focus case study cities.

2500 Sustainability & Human Society (4 credits)

Sustainability has become a catch phrase in discussions concerning the long-term viability of a number of phenomena, from the environment to the economy. Sustainability is commonly defined as meeting the needs of the current generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Students are introduced to issues inherent in discussions of sustainability. The major areas of focus include definitions of ecological and environmental sustainability, economic and political sustainability, and social justice, and various metrics used to assess sustainable behavior and practices. Students study the theory, principles and practices of sustainability, and participate in discussion and writing exercises based on lecture and readings.

2550 Issues in Sustainabilities (4 credits)

The capstone seminar focuses on a particular problem related to sustainability. Seminar topics vary by instructor, but include a combination of readings, discussion, guest speakers, a group project (either service learning or research), and individual research presentations. Prerequisite: completion of all other requirements for the sustainability minor.

2608 Human Dimensions-Global Change (4 credits)

This course documents and explores the transformations of the global environment that have occurred in the last 300 years and relates them to cotemporaneous changes in population and society. Students examine the complexity of human-induced environmental changes by looking at the various social, economical, political, institutional and behavioral components of these forces at work. By using various case studies, students examine the processes and spatial distributions of anthropological changes to the world's lands, freshwater, biota, oceans and atmosphere.

2700 Contemporary Environ Issues (4 credits)

Principles, practices, issues, and status of care of environment; lectures, readings, and discussions focus on causes, effects, and mitigation of a selection of topical regional, national, and international environmental problems including Denver's air pollution, acid deposition, hazardous waste management, global warming, and tropical deforestation.

2810 Geography of Latin America (4 credits)

This course will study the countries and islands of Middle America; the interrelationships of peoples, resources and physical features.

2830 Geography of Europe (4 credits)

A field course that examines relationships between humans and the environment in Europe. We study both urban and rural environments to understand the following questions: What are the elements (climate, vegetation, landforms) that characterize European natural landscapes? How have humans modified these natural landscapes? How have environmental conditions influenced human activities (e.g. agriculture, architecture, economic development)? How are these human activities manifested at the landscape scale, and how are they organized in geographic space? How have humans attempted to preserve natural landscapes? Prerequisites: GEOG 1201, 1202, 1203 and field quarter application process through the Geography department.

2850 Geography of National Parks (4 credits)

Emphasis is on the physical geography and geology of selected national parks; it therefore includes labs and field trips. In general, a national park covers a large area containing features of great scenic and scientific quality. It encompasses sufficient land and water resources for the adequate protection of the natural, historic and cultural resources of the park. Through the study of the natural and human history of selected parks, students become aware of interactions between natural and human landscapes and how these have changed over time. Current environmental and management issues facing the parks are also addressed.

2860 Geography of the Middle East (4 credits)

In-depth study to the physical and human geography of the Middle East. Upon completion of this course, students will be able to think and speak effectively about the Middle East, particularly about relationships between villagers, nomads and city folk; about the history of the region; about management of environmental problems such as desertification and water shortages; about the civilization of Islam, about culture and the role of all religions; about the reasons for war, the need for peace, and the role of terrorism; about oil and more importantly, the oil curse, and finally about the role of US foreign policy.

2870 Geography of India (4 credits)

This course will provide students with a comprehensive idea about India, which is considered as a major emerging power of this century. India is extremely diverse in terms of physical features and cultural practices. It has a very dynamic economic and political system. The long history of the land and its rich cultural heritage has made its lifestyle very different from the people outside the subcontinent. This course deals with all the above issues in brief and helps the students to gain an overall knowledge of the subcontinent. This is a good foundation course for those who participate in the study abroad program in India and also others who are interested in this region of the world.

2910 Honors Seminar in Geography (3 credits)

Individual investigation of some aspect of geography; developmental and research frontiers. Required for geography major in Honors Program.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3000 Advanced Geographic Statistics (4 credits)

The second in a sequence of two courses that address general statistical applications particular to geography, environmental science and other disciplines dealing with a spatial dimension in the data they work with. The focus of this second course is on the more advanced multivariate statistical techniques. The course has a strong applied orientation as particular attention is given to which technique is the most appropriate to use for a given type of problem and how to interpret and apply the resulting statistics. Extensive use is made of computer statistics packages. Homework exercises involving such statistical techniques as multiple correlation and regression analysis, principle components analysis, discriminate analysis and canonical correlation. Prerequisite: GEOG 2000.

3010 Geog Information Analysis (4 credits)

Reviews many basic statistical methods and applies them to various spatial datasets. In addition, several spatial statistical methods are applied to spatial datasets. This course is an in-depth study of the interface between GIS, spatial data, and statistical analysis.

3020 Advanced Computer Cartography (4 credits)

This course focuses on the design/construction of thematic maps using more complex techniques than mastered in the beginning course, e.g. color and directional time series point symbols.

3030 Advanced Field Methods (4 credits)

Various field methods used by researchers in physical geography; techniques include field mapping, laboratory analyses, geologic field methods. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201 or equivalent.

3040 GPS for Resource Mapping (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to GPS (Global Positioning Systems) concepts, techniques, and applications as they relate to GIS data collection. Lectures focus on satellite surveying, GPS technology, error sources, program planning, data collection design, and Quality Control and Quality Assurance issues for data collection programs. Hands-on lab exercises include navigation, mission planning for a GPS survey, designing a field data collection plan and associated data dictionary, field data collection, differential correction, and data integration into a GIS and map production.

3100 Geospatial Data (4 credits)

This graduate-level course is designed to provide graduate students from a broad range of disciplines with the skills to carry out applied research tasks and projects requiring the integration of geographic information system technologies and geospatial data. Students are introduced to a collection of techniques and data sources with a focus on acquiring and integrating data. Legal, ethical, and institutional problems related to data acquisition for geospatial information systems are also discussed.

3110 GIS Modeling (4 credits)

This course focuses on the concepts and procedures used in discovering and applying relationships within and among maps. It extends the mapping and geo-query capabilities of GIS to map analysis and construction of spatial models. The course establishes a comprehensive framework that addresses a wide range of applications from natural resources to retail marketing. Topics include the nature of spatial data introduction to spatial statistics and surface modeling in t first five weeks followed by spatial analysis operations and modeling techniques in the second five weeks. The lectures, discussions and independent exercises provide a foundation for creative application of GIS technology in spatial reasoning and decision making.

3130 Adv Geographic Info Systems (4 credits)

This advanced course explores the more technical aspects of GIS functions and data structures. Students have hands-on access to both raster (grid-cell) and vector-based software packages in the form of lab exercises that culminate in a small student-designed GIS project.

3140 GIS Database Design (4 credits)

Designing databases to provide a foundation for GIS functions and applications, including investigating techniques used for designing databases in non-spatial environments and learning the applicability to GIS problems. Building on concepts and techniques introduced in the first half to extend traditional techniques and methodologies to model the requirements of spatial problems. Students learn to translate the conceptual spatial model into a physical implementation specific to GIS products. Prerequisite(s): GEOG 3100.

3150 GIS Project Management (4 credits)

This course provides graduate students seeking a career in GIS, or anyone managing a GIS project, with the knowledge, skill and abilities to take a GIS project or program past the design and implementation phase and into day-to-day operation. Students evaluate and analyze the role of GIS in an organization's overall information system strategy and communicate the importance of geography in an information system. Data sharing in the organization is examined to determine the benefits and costs of distributing data creation and maintenance activities throughout an organization. Finally, the role of GIS professionals and the skill sets required to manage GIS effectively are examined. Students review case studies of successful and not-so- successful GIS projects in North America. GIS management issues are addressed by a series of case studies focusing on various management aspects. Students are also expected to visit operational GIS programs in the metropolitan area and interview GIS managers. Students prepare case study evaluations for review in the classroom. Required for all MSGIS students because of the critical importance of GIS project management.

3200 Remote Sensing (4 credits)

This course acquaints students with the basic techniques of the collection, processing and interpretation of information about the character of the earth's surface from remote locations. Students become familiar with the use of the visible, infrared, thermal and microwave portions of the electromagnetic spectrum as a means of determining land cover and/or land use. Both manual and computer- assisted techniques and discussed and include hands-on applications.

3230 Advanced Remote Sensing (4 credits)

This course will build on the basic remote sensing concepts presented in GEOG 3200. Students will explore more in-depth concepts relevant to satellite and airborne remote sensing, including radiative transfer and information extraction. In addition, students will be introduced to two cutting-edge sources of data about the Earth's surface: hyperspectral and lidar (Light Detection and Ranging) sensors. Students will study specific applications of advanced digital image processing techniques for environmental monitoring, natural resource management, and land-use planning. Finally, students will integrate remote sensing and other spatial datasets in the context of Geographic Information System (GIS) analysis. Prerequisite: GEOG 3200.

3300 Cultural Geography (4 credits)

Themes and methods of cultural geography including cultural area, landscape, history and ecology.

3310 Cult/Nature/Econ-Human Ecology (4 credits)

Cultural adaptation, livelihood strategies and environmental modification among subsistence and peasant societies: responses of such groups to technological change and economic integration.

3320 Global Change-Human Dimension (4 credits)

This course documents and explores the transformations of the global environment that have occurred in the last 300 years and relates them to co-temporaneous changes in population and society.

3330 Political Geography (4 credits)

 

3340 Geographies of Migration (4 credits)

This course explores contemporary movement of people across international borders and the social, cultural, political, economic, and environmental repercussions of such movements. The class looks at the global flow of people across national boundaries and the ways in which these dispersed peoples build and maintain social networks across national borders. While do so, we address the role of globalization in international migration processes. What motivates people to move long distances, often across several international borders and at considerable financial and psychological cost? How do migrants change - and how in turn do they bring change, social as well as economic, to new destinations as well as places left behind? This course examines politics and patterns of migration, transnational migration, and immigration to the United States.

3400 Urban Landscapes (4 credits)

Urbanization as a process; national urban systems; internal spatial structure of cities; role of transportation in urban development; location of residential, commercial and industrial activities; agglomeration economies; residential congregation and segregation; environmental justice; urban growth and growth coalitions; decentralization and urban sprawl; edge cities; impacts on the urban environment; world cities; globalization.

3410 Urban Applications in GIS (4 credits)

This course explores several ways to analyze the urban environment using a Geographic Information System. Datasets of points (e.g. residential locations of survey respondents), lines (existing and proposed light rail lines), polygons (e.g. census tracts), and pixels (e.g. air- photos and satellite imagery) are used to perform various analyses. Student interests define what kinds of analysis are performed. Examples include: characterizing the propensity of Denver metro-area citizens to ride light rail - does residential location matter? Is there a quantitative relationship between nighttime light emissions and population density in Colorado cities? Perception and reality: How do Denver-area residents' perceptions of crime in their own neighborhoods relate to actual crime statistics for the location? The sequence of events for the course is question formulation, design of analysis and analysis. If any explorations produce interesting results, students are encouraged to take an independent study course (GEOG 3991) in the following quarter to write and publish their results.

3420 Urban and Regional Planning (4 credits)

Historical evolution of planning theory and practices; comprehensive planning process; legal, political, economic, social, environmental aspects of urban planning; urban design; urban renewal and community development; transportation planning; economic development planning; growth management; environmental and energy planning; planning for metropolitan regions; national planning.

3425 Urban Sustainability (4 credits)

The 21st century is being called the 'century of the city'. Now more than ever, humans across the globe call the city their home. Many of the world's most pressing crises are manifest in cities, including: greenhouse gas emissions, land degradation, high mass production and consumption, widespread poverty and hunger, and expanding socio-economic disparities. As 'sustainability' becomes part of mainstream discourse, this course explores what sustainability means for urban contexts around the globe. Arguably, the city has the potential to be the most efficient, equitable, and environmental form of modern human settlement. Covering all dimensions of sustainability from a social science perspective, this course focuses on theoretical groundings, practices of urban sustainability, and new research agendas. Major topics include: cities and nature; planning and land use; urban form; community and neighborhoods; transportation systems and accessibility; livelihood and urban economies; and social justice and the city.

3430 Land Use:Plan,Policy,Urban Gro (4 credits)

As part of the planning sequence in geography, this course focuses on how land is used in both urban and rural contexts. Emphasis is on the U.S. experience, especially land use issues in the American West. Topics include the historical, political, economic, social and environmental aspects of land use, as well as the relationship of land use planning to the comprehensive urban-planning process.

3440 Urban Transportation Planning (4 credits)

A specialized course in the urban planning sequence focusing on issues, practices and policies of urban transportation planning. Recommended for anyone interested in timely transportation topics, such as the feasibility and impacts of light rail transit, the planning and implementation of highway projects, and the role of freight and passenger transportation companies in transportation planning.

3460 Air Transportation & Tourism (4 credits)

This course delves into the world of commercial air passenger transportation, studying the foundations of the industry, its role in the travel and tourism, and strategies for the future. Foundational topics include the history and geography of air transportation, air travel and tourism, the geography of tourism, airline corporate cultures, the role of government, aviation law, regulation, deregulation, and globalization. Study of the principal elements of airline economics, finance, planning, management, operations, pricing, promotion, cost containment, marketing, and policy provide the opportunity for consideration of strategic options within the contemporary airline industry. Further discussion focuses on the planning and management of airport and airway system infrastructure, the issue of sustainable air transportation, and the role of the airline industry within the context of intermodalism.

3470 GIS & Envrmtl Health Geography (4 credits)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the spatial distributions of populations and their relationships to environmental pollution sources and health outcomes. It utilizes real-life scenarios using population data from the U.S. census, EPA pollution data and various types of vital statistics data. The goal is to implement novel geographic techniques such as spatial analytical techniques and atmospheric modeling of pollutants to assess possible health risks and outcomes. This class requires basic GIS knowledge.

3500 Reconst Quaternry Environment (4 credits)

Nature, magnitude, sequence and causes of Pleistocene and Holocene climatic changes; effects of climatic change on plant/animal distributions and human populations; paleoclimatic research methods. Laboratory and field trips. Prerequisites: GEOG Core, ENVI 3000.

3510 Biogeography (4 credits)

Biogeography focuses on present and past distributions of plants and animals. In this course we consider a number of themes central to biogeography, including plate tectonics and biogeography, the effects of climate change of plant and animal distributions, biogeographic realms, island biogeography, biodiversity, human impacts on plants and animals, and the origins of agriculture.

3520 Geography of Soils (4 credits)

Spatial variation in soil characteristics; soil processes, soil morphology, their application in soil studies. Prerequisite(s): GEOL 2010 or equivalent or instructor's permission. Recommended prerequisite(s): general chemistry.

3530 Groundwater Hydrology (4 credits)

 

3540 Reclamation of Disturbed Land (4 credits)

A variety of human activities disturb natural environmental systems. The principles and practices used to reclaim disturbed lands to productive uses are the focus of this course. Prerequisites: GEOG 1201, 1202, 1203 or equivalent.

3550 Topics in Physical Geography (1 to 5 credits)

Investigations into various aspects of physical environment.

3560 Fluvial Geomorphology (4 credits)

Examines how water and sediment interact at Earth's surface to create a variety of landforms ranging from small rills to continental-scale river systems. Introduces fundamental fluvial processes or channel hydraulics and sediment transport. Examines common fluvial landforms including alluvial streams, bedrock streams, floodplains and alluvial fans. Combines traditional lectures and in-class discussions with numerous field excursions to rivers in the Rocky Mountains and Great Plains. Prerequisite: GEOL 3540 or instructor approval.

3600 Meteorology (4 credits)

The basic theory and skills of weather forecasting. Topics include through coverage of atmosphere dynamics and thermodynamics, the evolution of various weather types, the mechanics of storm systems (cyclones, severe storms, hurricanes), creation and interpretation of weather maps, and forecasting techniques.

3610 Climatology (4 credits)

Climatology is the study of the processes that result in spatial and temporal variation of weather. This course introduces the student to the processes responsible for the transfer of matter and energy between the earth's surface and the atmosphere and the average weather conditions that result. In addition, topics of global concern, such as greenhouse effect, El Nino, urban heat islands and acid rain, are discussed. Laboratory exercises provide an opportunity to investigate climate variation and climatic change through the use of variety of computer simulations.

3620 Applied Climatology (4 credits)

Climatic impact on environmental systems and human behavior; techniques to investigate climatic characteristics of environmental extremes (floods, blizzards), urban climatology and socioeconomic impacts of climate. Prerequisites: GEOG 1201 required; GEOG 3600 or GEOG 3610 recommended.

3630 Dendroclimatology (2 to 4 credits)

Systematic variations in tree ring width and/or density can be used to reconstruct changes in precipitation or temperature well before humans were around to record the variability. This class utilizes hands on methods to introduce the fundamental principles of dendroclimatology. Through readings and lectures, students will learn how tree ring growth can be correlated to climate change. Students will then undertake several research projects to reconstruct past climate variability in the Denver metro area using tree rings. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

3700 Environment & Development (4 credits)

Course examines interrelated nature of environmental and development issues in the Third World; addresses the place of environment in development theory and practice. The political ecology of Third World environmental problems and sustainable development approaches.

3701 Topics in Geog. Info. Science (1 to 4 credits)

Topics vary by instructor.

3710 Envi Change E. Mediterranean (2 credits)

We tend to associate environmental problems with modern societies and high technology. However, humans have had impacts on the environment, and have had to cope with challenges brought by the environment, throughout their history. Western cultures are intimately linked to the eastern Mediterranean, where some of the earliest centralized governments arose, agriculture developed, and humans first began living in permanent settlements, so the region has a long history of human-environment interaction. This class focuses on historical, archaeological, and paleoenvironmental records from the region to investigate the impacts of human activities, including deforestation, intensive agriculture, and urban development, on the environment, and the ways in which societies in the region responded to natural environmental perturbations, including drought, earthquakes, and volcanic eruptions.

3720 Mountain Environments (4 credits)

Mountain Environments and Sustainability explores the unique physical and cultural aspects of high relief and/or high altitude environments. Covering one quarter of the Earth's land surface, mountains directly or indirectly impact the lives of millions of people. We examine the significance of mountains to climate, water resources, and human activities, and discuss the sustainability of these environments and communities in light of rapid changes in many mountain regions resulting from anthropogenic factors and global change. GEOG 1201, 1202, and 1203 or instructor approval.

3730 Internatl Environmental Policy (4 credits)

This course acquaints students with the global perspective on current problems of environmental protection and resource use. Population growth, food production, industrialization, technology and cultural change are considered, with heavy emphasis on the social dynamics of environmental problems. A variety of political views are studied, and an attempt is made to develop a perspective useful to students in personal and political decisions.

3740 Env. Justice in the City (4 credits)

This course is designed to acquaint students with environmental justice in the urban environment. This class focuses on the City of Denver as a laboratory to explore the disproportionate impacts of social justice issues, particularly urban pollution, healthy food sources, gentrification, light rail, and employment opportunities, on neighborhoods and communities. A variety of views are studied, and an attempt is made to develop a perspective useful to students to explain urban social justice conditions.

3800 Geography of Colorado (4 credits)

This course focuses on the physical and human geography of Colorado, a state that includes the western Great Plains, the southern Rocky Mountains, and the eastern Colorado Plateau. Colorado's varied natural landscapes provide equally varied settings for human settlement and resource use. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201, 1202, and 1203 strongly recommended.

3830 Nat Resrce Analysis & Planning (4 credits)

Natural resources provide the basis for all human agricultural and industrial activities. This course discusses our resource distribution, conservation, management and sustainable use.

3840 Water Resource Analysis (4 credits)

The focus of this course is on complex policy, economic and local, national and international, and political issues surrounding resource use in the western U.S. Issues include exploitation of nonrenewable and renewable energy and mineral resources; and flexible responses to changing public policy.

3850 Renewable Energy Technologies (4 credits)

The discussion of our dependency on fossil fuels has been in the forefront of energy discussions for more than 30 years. Experts currently predict that peak world oil production will be reached near the beginning of the 21st century, and will decline steadily thereafter. The Middle East and OPEC countries, areas associated with frequent political unrest, control most of the world's oil supply. Education in alternative and renewable energy sources is critical to ensuring a good energy usage mix for future generations. This course helps students understand alternative and renewable energy technologies that have been developed and know the positive and negative aspects of each energy source. U.S. energy policy is briefly discussed. A cost-benefit analysis for each form of alternative energy is studied to help students determine which types are practical on a large scale. Particular attention is paid to the efficiency of each energy source, as well as limitations in the extraction of usable energy from each source.

3860 GIS Apps Natural Resources (4 credits)

In this course we will use a case study approach to examine domestic and international natural resources such as oil, coal, timber, minerals, and recycled materials. We will use a case study approach to look at resource distribution, and the environmental impacts of extraction, production, and disposal, as well as the legal and economic context. We will use GIS data and analysis to enhance our understanding of these case studies, and students will do a project and paper using GIS data and image analysis at a local, regional or global scale. Prerequisite: Introduction to GIS or Introduction to GIS Modeling.

3870 Water Resrcs & Sustainability (4 credits)

In this course, we look at water as both a local and global resource and examine what sustainability means for human and ecological realms. After an overview of the physical processes that drive the hydrologic cycle, surface and groundwater hydrology, we examine how we humans have harnessed water for our use and how we both alter and treat its quality. We examine the legal aspects of water allocation in the U.S. and the groups and agencies that are most involved in managing and overseeing water issues. Finally, we examine the most pressing water "issues" related to wildlife, development, scarcity and conflict. We look forward to imagining the power of both the individual and the collective in meeting our future, global water needs.

3880 Cleantech and Sustainability (4 credits)

Cleantech has only recently become part of our vernacular and it refers to the technology that enables us to produce energy in a manner that has little or no environmental impact (solar, geothermal, wind, responsible biofuels). Clean technology will not only offer us a chance to rehabilitate the climate, but should make us more aware of how fundamental our approach to everyday life needs a more sustainable consciousness. As part of the debate, we will examine some of the problems facing civilization, why we are not sustainable, who the major players are, and how a more sustainable existence is not just our moral obligation, but it is also good economics, sound foreign policy, and it will accelerate poverty alleviation.

3890 Ecological Economics (4 credits)

Ecological Economics is an emerging transdisciplinary endeavor that reintegrates the natural and social sciences toward the goal of developing a united understanding of natural and human-dominated ecosystems and designing a sustainable and desirable future for humans on a materially finite planet. In this course we start with a basic overview and summary of the neo-classical economic perspective with a particular focus on the recognized market failures of public goods, common property, and externalities. We begin with a reconceptualization of economic theory by imposing scientific constraints (e.g. conservation of mass and energy, the laws of thermodynamics, evolutionary theory, etc.). Using the ideas developed in this reconceptualization of economic theory we explore the implications for international trade and myriad public policies associated with the ethical, environmental, and economic aspects of sustainability.

3910 Process Geomorphology (4 credits)

The land surface of Earth is continuously altered by geomorphic processes. This class focuses upon the nature of these processes, the work that they perform and the resulting landforms. In addition, students become familiar with various methods of geomorphic analysis through the laboratory component of the class. Prerequisite: GEOG 1202 or GEOG 1217 or instructor's permission.

3920 Remote Sensing Seminar (4 credits)

Special topics in advanced remote sensing.

3930 Cultural Geography Seminar (4 credits)

Topics, methods and current research in cultural geography.

3940 Urban Geography Seminar (4 credits)

International comparison of economic and social, positive and negative aspects of urban systems. Prerequisite: GEOG 3400 or GEOG 3420.

3950 Physical Geography Seminar (2 to 4 credits)

 

3955 Pollen Analysis Seminar (3 credits)

Pollen grains preserved in sediment provide long-term records of vegetation conditions. Changing proportions of pollen types may reflect climatic fluctuation or human impacts. We review important recent research in pollen analysis (palynology), pollen sampling, laboratory techniques and pollen identification. Students are responsible for counting a number of samples and contributing data for a pollen diagram.

3960 Climatology Seminar (4 credits)

In-depth study of selected aspects of climatology. Topics dependent on instructor. Prerequisite: GEOG 3610 or equivalent.

3970 Int'l Service Learning: (1 to 5 credits)

This is a generic course for service learning with project to vary with different topics. All of the International Service Learning projects will combine academic study at the University of Denver with further academic study and service work in-country. Students will perform at least 60 hours of service, attend lectures by local and international experts, hear from guest speakers, visit sites of environmental and cultural interest, and complete a series of writing assignments. Students will also attend campus classes prior to traveling to their site designed to provide students with background on the history, culture and environment of the country. This course will provide students with an unparalleled opportunity to observe and participate actively in one developing nation's efforts to balance environment, development and social concerns in a manner that is sustainable for present and future generations. This course will also provide students with the opportunity to learn about environmental issues. Through lectures, written work and discussion, students will apply academic knowledge and theories to their actual experience, focusing on issues related to the environment, social and economic development, and culture.

3980 Regional Geography Seminar (4 credits)

Study of part or all of a specific regional division such as Europe, Asia, Africa, Oceania, South America or North America.

3990 Undergraduate Research Seminar (1 credits)

This course is designed to prepare students who will participate in faculty-supervised summer research projects. Students are introduced to research design, use of the scientific method, research expectations and reporting of result. Preparation of formal research proposal with adviser.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3995 Independent Research (1 to 5 credits)

 

3999 Geographic Internship (1 to 5 credits)

Supervised internship in a government office at local, state or federal level or within private sector. Prerequisites: 15 quarter hours in geography and approval or department. Maximum of 10 quarter hours total.

4000 Fundamental Geog Perspective (3 credits)

A foundation course for persons in the community, without a degree in geography, who want to purse an education in or make use of computer-based geographic technology but who need a foundation in geographic concepts and perspectives.

4010 History and Philosophy of Geog (2 credits)

 

4020 Geog Research Methodology (3 credits)

 

4030 Advanced Field Research (1 to 5 credits)

 

4040 Research Topic Identification (1 to 2 credits)

 

4100 ApplicationDesign/ProductionI (4 credits)

First of a two quarter sequence designed to be a culminating educational experience. Primarily lab-based with some lecture material, the various application requirements and guidance on how to go about accomplishing Application Design and Production tasks is provided. Prerequisites: GEOG 2000, 2100/3100 or equivalent.

4105 ApplicationDesign/ProductionII (4 credits)

This course places emphasis on programming and producing technical reports and/or papers that will be published in the Geography Department's on-line applications library. Prerequisite: GEOG 4100.

4410 Economic Geography (4 credits)

The study of the location and spatial organization of economic activities at the local, national, and global scales. Concerned with the spatial configuration of firms, networks, industries, and regions within the emerging global economy.

4460 Air Transportation & Tourism (4 credits)

This course will be cross listed with GEOG 3460 Air Transportation & Tourism.

4810 Geography of Latin America (4 credits)

In this course, we examine how past and present cultural preferences and political economies effect changes in Latin American landscapes.

4900 Graduate Colloquium in Geog (1 to 3 credits)

Solid foundation in history and philosophy of the discipline of geography; basis for further exploration of major research specialization.

4950 Advanced Field Research (1 to 17 credits)

 

4991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4993 Capstone or Project (1 to 4 credits)

Includes technical design and development for MA geotechnical track project and MS-GIS capstone project.

4994 Report (1 to 5 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 5 credits)

Includes field research for doctoral dissertation.

4999 Geographic Internship (1 to 5 credits)

 

5991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

5992 Directed Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

5995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 


Geology
1010 Physical Geology (4 credits)

Physical geology examines the internal structure of the Earth, the nature and properties of Earth materials, their distribution through the Earth, and the processes by which rocks are formed, altered, and transported. This course serves as an introduction to the geological sciences and is a prerequisite to advanced study.

1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2010 Landform Analysis (4 credits)

The surface of the Earth undergoes continual reshaping by water, wind, ice and other agents of geomorphic change. These changes produce characteristic landforms that can be produced almost instantaneously (as in an earthquake) or may be nearly imperceptible over the span of a human lifetime. This class examines earth's numerous landforms to better understand geologic change. Prerequisite: GEOL 1010, GEOG 1203 or instructor's permission.

2020 Historical Geology (4 credits)

Historical geology is the study of the evolution of earth through geologic time. Geologic features such as rock types and fossils are used to interpret and date past events. This course specifically introduces the basic geologic principles underlying historical geology, the geologic evolution of North America, and the evolution of life on Earth.

2380 Rocks and Minerals (4 credits)

This class focuses on the identification, classification, and formation of common rock types and rock-forming minerals. Students will learn to reconstruct geologic conditions and earth history from rock and mineral features. Prerequisite: GEOL 1010, GEOG 1203 or permission of instructor.

2400 Geology and Ecology of the SW (5 credits)

This field class emphasizes firsthand observations of the interactions among environmental properties (including substrate geology, soils, and climate) and natural vegetation in the Colorado Front Range, Rio Grande Rift, and Chihuahuan desert regions of New Mexico and southeastern Arizona. The course also examines Pliocene and Quaternary volcanism in southern Colorado and New Mexico in addition to Paleozoic and Mesozoic geology along the uplands of the Rio Grande Rift. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3010 Process Geomorphology (4 credits)

The land surface of earth is continuously altered by geomorphic processes. This class focuses upon the nature of these processes, the work that they perform and the resulting landforms. In addition, the student becomes familiar with various methods of geomorphic analysis through the laboratory component of the class. Prerequisite: GEOL 1010, GEOG 1202 or permission of instructor.

3100 Environmental Geology (4 credits)

Environmental geology examines geologic hazards, both natural and those attributable to human impacts on the environment from urban and regional development. Specific topics may include disposal of municipal solid waste and radioactive waste; flood, earthquake, volcanic hazards; groundwater pollution and withdrawal; mass-wasting phenomena; and energy-related issues. Prerequisite: GEOL 1010, GEOG 1203 or instructor's permission.

3200 Sedimentology/Stratigraphy (4 credits)

This course reviews the origin, geologic history, and depositional environments of sediments and sedimentary rocks. Course work concentrates on the identification of sedimentary rocks and depositional environments by first-hand observations of rocks in the Denver area. Prerequisite: GEOL 1010, GEOG 1203 or instructor's permission.

3300 Petroleum Geology (4 credits)

This class examines the geological occurrences of petroleum including the origin, migration, and accumulation of oil and natural gas. This class differs from traditional petroleum geology classes by offering an examination of the economics and politics underlying the oil and gas industry, and by considering alternatives to traditional hydrocarbon resources. Prerequisite: GEOL 1010, GEOG 1203 or instructor's permission.

3540 Hydrology (4 credits)

This course provides an overview of the hydrologic cycle with emphasis placed on the study of applied hydrology. Discussions include the fundamental characteristics of precipitation, runoff processes, calculation of flood hazards, aquifers (porosity and permeability), the geologic settings of groundwater, the basic physics of groundwater flow, and water supply and use. Prerequisite: GEOL 1010, GEOG 1203 or instructor's permission. Recommended prerequisite: one introductory statistics course.

3900 Geomorphology Seminar (1 to 5 credits)

Hill slopes comprise the vast majority of the earth's land surface. It is upon these surfaces that nearly all of the human population must exist and, hopefully, flourish. Hill slopes assume various forms, and their shape influences their utility for various human endeavors. Numerous geomorphic processes operate upon hill slopes to determine their form, and human activities strongly influence the frequency and magnitude of these geomorphic processes. Consequently, hill slopes are an interface between the earth and the human population. Prerequisite: GEOL 3010 or permission of instructor.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 


Mathematics
1150 Foundations Seminar (4 credits)

The seminars offer challenging and interesting mathematical topics with a computer science component that requires only high school mathematics. Examples of seminars are Introduction to Crytography, Patterns and Symmetry, Mathematical Art and Patterns of Voting.

1200 Calculus - Business & Soc Sci (0 or 4 credits)

This is a one-quarter course for students in Business, Social Sciences, and Liberal Arts. It covers elementary differential calculus with emphasis on applications to business and the social sciences. Topics include functions, graphs, limits, continuity, differentiation, and mathematical models. Students are required to attend weekly labs during which time they will complete related lab assignments on their laptops using a computer algebra software package.

1700 College Algebra (2 credits)

This is a self-paced, online course designed to review the required algebra skills to be successful in MATH 1200. The students receive individualized help in the following topics: review for basic algebra, equations and inequalities, rectangular coordinate system and graphing, functions, and exponential and logarithmic functions.

1750 College Algebra & Trigonometry (4 credits)

Selected topics in algebra and analytic trigonometry intended to prepare students for calculus sequence (MATH 1951, 1952, 1953). Cannot be used to satisfy the mathematics/computing core requirements.

1951 Calculus I (4 credits)

Limits, continuity, differentiation of functions of one variable, applications of the derivative. Students with high school trigonometry should enter th Calculus sequence in fall quarter. Others should complete prerequisite MATH 1750 and enter the Calculus sequence in winter quarter. Prerequisite: MATH 1750 or equivalent.

1952 Calculus II (4 credits)

Differentiation and integration of functions of one variable. Use of a laptop computer and a computer algebra system is an integral component of the course. Prerequisite: MATH 1951.

1953 Calculus III (4 credits)

Integration of functions of one variable, infinite sequences and series. Use of a laptop computer and a computer algebra system is an integral component of the course. Prerequisite: MATH 1952.

1962 Honors Calculus II (4 credits)

Same topics as MATH 1952 enriched in the same ways as MATH 1961 enriches MATH 1951. Use of a laptop computer and a computer algebra system is an integral component of the course. Prerequisite: MATH 1961 or permission of instructor.

1963 Honors Calculus III (4 credits)

Same topics as MATH 1953 enriched in the same ways as MATH 1961 enriches MATH 1951. Use of a laptop computer and a computer algebra system is an integral component of the course. Prerequisite: MATH 1962 or permission of instructor.

1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2050 Symbolic Logic (4 credits)

Modern propositional logic; symbolization and calculus of predicates, especially predicates of relation. Cross-listed with PHIL 2160.

2060 Elements of Linear Algebra (4 credits)

Matrices, systems of linear equations, vectors, eigenvalues and eigenvectors; idea of a vector space; applications in the physical, social, engineering and life sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1750 or equivalent.

2070 Intro Differential Equations (4 credits)

Solution of linear differential equations; special techniques for nonlinear problems; mathematical modeling of problems from physical and biological sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 1953 or MATH 1963.

2080 Calculus of Several Variables (4 credits)

Multivariable processes encountered in all sciences; multiple integration, partial differentiation and applications; algebra of vectors in Euclidean three-space; differentiation of scalar and vector functions. Prerequisites: MATH 1953 or MATH 1963.

2200 Intro to Discrete Structures (4 credits)

Introduction to theory of sets; relations and functions; logic, truth tables and propositional calculus; proof techniques; introduction to combinatorial techniques. Prerequisite: high school algebra.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3000 The Real World Seminar (1 credits)

Lectures by alumni and others on surviving culture shock when leaving the University and entering the job world. Open to all students regardless of major. Cross-listed with COMP 3000.

3010 History of Mathematics (4 credits)

This course surveys major mathematical developments beginning with ancient Egyptians and Greeks and tracing the development through Hindu-Indian mathematics, Arabic mathematics, and European mathematics up to the 18th century. Prerequisite: MATH 1953.

3040 Lattices and Order (4 credits)

Ordered sets, lattices as relational and as algebraic structures, ideals and filters, complete lattices, distributive and modular lattices, Boolean algebras, duality for finite distributive lattices. Prerequisite: MATH 2200 or MATH 2050.

3050 Set Theory (4 credits)

Zermelo-Fraenkel axioms, axiom of choice, Zorn's Lemma, ordinals, cardinals, cardinal arithmetic. Prerequisite: MATH 2200 or MATH 2050

3060 Mathematical Logic (4 credits)

Classical propositional calculus (deductive systems and truth-table semantics), first-order logic (axiomatixation and completeness), elements of recursion theory, introduction to nonclassical logics. Prerequisite: MATH 2200 or MATH 2050.

3080 Introduction to Probability (4 credits)

Basic probability models, combinatorial methods, random variables, independence, conditional probability, probability laws, applications to classical problems. Prerequisite: MATH 1952.

3090 Mathematical Probability (4 credits)

Limit theorems for independent random variables, multivariate distributions, generating functions, random walks and statistical techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 1953 or MATH 1963 and MATH 3080.

3110 Introduction to Topology (4 credits)

Point set topology including topological spaces, connectedness, compactness and separate axioms; preparation for advanced courses in analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 3161 or equivalent.

3120 Introduction to Topology (4 credits)

Point set topology including topological spaces, connectedness, compactness and separation axioms; preparation for advanced courses in analysis. Prerequisite: junior standing.

3151 Advanced Linear Algebra (4 credits)

Vector spaces, linear mappings, matrices, inner product spaces, eigenvalues and eigenvectors. Prerequisite: MATH 2060.

3152 Linear Algebra II (4 credits)

Linear operators on finite dimensional vector spaces, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, Jordan forms; special properties of self-adjoint and normal operators; special topics. Prerequisite: MATH 3151.

3161 Intro to Real Analysis (4 credits)

A theoretical introduction to the foundations of calculus including sequences, limits, continuity, derivatives and Riemann integration. Prerequisite: MATH 2080 and a theorem proving course.

3166 Group Theory (4 credits)

Groups and homomorphisms, isomorphism theorems, symmetric groups and G-sets, the Sylow theorems, normal series, fundamental theorem of finitely generated abelian groups. Prerequisite: MATH 3170.

3170 Intro to Abstract Algebra (4 credits)

Examples of groups, permutations, subgroups, cosets, Lagrange theorem, normal subgroups, factor groups, homomorphisms, isomorphisms, rings, integral domains, quaternions, rings of polynomials, Euclid algorithm, ideals, factor rings, maximal ideals, principal ideals, fields, construction of finite fields. Prerequisite: MATH 2200 or one year of university-level mathematics.

3180 Mathematical Statistics (4 credits)

Mathematical foundations of statistical theory, random sampling, theoretical distributions, estimation, test of hypotheses, limit theorems, correlation and regression, nonparametric statistics, decision theory. Students may not receive credit for both MATH 3180 and 3190. Prerequisites: MATH 1953 or MATH 1963 and MATH 3080.

3221 Automata & Formal Languages I (4 credits)

Introduction to computability, effective procedures, format languages, undecidability; finite automata and regular languages. Prerequisite: MATH 2200 or one year of university-level mathematics.

3222 Automata & Formal Languages II (4 credits)

Pushdown automata and context-free languages; Turing machines; decidability, recursive and recursively enumerable sets. Prerequisite: MATH 3221.

3260 Metric Spaces (4 credits)

Metric spaces and continuous functions; completeness and compactness; examples including norm spaces; pointwise and uniform convergence; Baire Category Theorem. Prerequisite: MATH 3161 or equivalent.

3311 Intro to Operations Research I (4 credits)

Linear optimization models, simplex algorithm, sensitivity analysis and duality, network models, dynamic programming, applications to physical, social and management sciences. Prerequisite: MATH 2060.

3312 Intro-Operations Research II (4 credits)

Nonlinear and stochastic models, elementary queuing theory, integer programming, introduction to simulation; applications to physical, social and management sciences. Prerequisites: MATH 1953 or MATH 1963 and MATH 3311.

3350 Mathematics of Finance (4 credits)

Mathematical aspect of options markets, interest rates and discounting; hedging and arbitrage; pricing options with binomial tree models; risk-neutral probabilities and martingales; Brownian motion, geometric Brownian motion and the Black-Scholes formula. Prerequisite: MATH 3080.

3400 Introduction to Geometry (4 credits)

Specific geometrical systems including finite, Euclidean, non-Euclidean and projective geometries. Prerequisites: junior standing and one year of university-level mathematics.

3451 Chaos, Dynamics & Fractals I (4 credits)

Introduction to one-dimensional dynamical systems, fractals; fixed and periodic points; sources and sinks; period doubling and tangent node bifurcations; chaotic dynamical systems; Sarkovskii's Theorem. Prerequisites: MATH 2080 and instructor's permission.

3452 Chaos, Dynamics & Fractals II (4 credits)

Dynamical systems in two (or more) real variables or one complex variable; stable manifold theorem; Henon attractor; Julia sets; Mandelbrodt set. Prerequisite: MATH 3451 or instructor's permission.

3550 Intro to Theory of Numbers (4 credits)

Concepts of nonanalytic number theory and its history; prime numbers, divisibility, continued fractions, modular arithmetic, Diophantine equations and unsolved conjectures. Prerequisites: MATH 2200 or MATH 2050.

3651 Diff Eqns and Applied Math I (4 credits)

Modeling of phenomena by ordinary differential equations; techniques of analysis and solution of such equations; oscillation theory and boundary value problems, power series methods, special functions, Laplace transforms and difference equations. Prerequisites: MATH 2060 and MATH 2070.

3652 Diff Eqns and Applied Math II (4 credits)

Continuation of modeling of phenomena by ordinary and partial differential equations; classification of second order partial differential equations; separation of variables, transform methods, special functions, method of characteristics. Prerequisite: MATH 3651.

3701 Combinatorics (4 credits)

The principle of inclusion and exclusion, elementary counting techniques, systems of distinct representatives, partitions, recursion and generating functions, Latin squares, designs and projective planes. Prerequisite: MATH 2200.

3705 Topics in Mathematics (4 credits)

Varying selected advanced topics in mathematics, depending on student demand and instructor interest. Possible alternatives include calculus of variations, partial differential equations, algebraic topology, differential manifolds, special functions.

3706 Intro to Computer Algebra (4 credits)

Introduction to computer algebra, the algorithmic solution of mathematical problems; use of computer algebra software (MAPLE or MATHEMATICA); algorithms for analysis and manipulation of polynomial, algebraic, and trigonometric expressions; algorithms for differentiation and integration; applications to calculus and differential equations. Cross-listed as COMP 3706. Prerequisites: MATH 1951, MATH 1952, MATH 1953 and permission of instructor.

3707 Math Methods Computer Algebra (4 credits)

Mathematical theory and algorithms used to design modern computer algebra systems. Includes selected topics from integer algorithms, greatest common divisor algorithms for polynomials, polynomial factorization algorithm, resultant computation and applications, polynomial decomposition, and the Risch integration algorithm. Cross-listed as COMP 3707. Prerequisite: MATH 3706 or COMP 3706.

3710 Graph Theory (4 credits)

Paths, cycles, trees, Euler tours and Hamilton cycles, bipartite graphs, matchings, basic connectivity theorems, planar graphs, Kuratowski's theorem, chromatic number, n-color theorems, introduction to Ramsey theory. Prerequisite: MATH 2200 or previous experience with abstract reasoning and basic combinations.

3720 Coding Theory (4 credits)

Goals of coding theory and information theory, instantaneous and Huffman codes, Shannon theorems, block and linear codes, generating and parity-check matrices, Hamming codes, perfect codes, binary Golay code, Reed-Muller codes, cyclic codes, BCH codes, Reed-Solomon codes, ideas of convolutional and turbo codes. Prerequisite: MATH 3170.

3851 Functions Complex Variable I (4 credits)

Complex numbers, analytic functions, complex integration, series expansions, residue theory, conformal maps, advanced topics and applications. Prerequisite: MATH 2080.

3852 Functions Complex Variable II (4 credits)

Advanced topics in complex analysis with applications. Prerequisite: MATH 3851.

3950 Undergraduate Research Seminar (1 to 4 credits)

Opportunity to conduct mathematics research; bridges the gap between homework exercises and research problems with directed readings and challenging projects. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

Cannot be arranged for any course that appears in regular course schedule for that particular year.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4110 Introduction to Topology (4 credits)

Point set topology including topological spaces, connectedness, compactness and separate axioms; preparation for advanced courses in analysis. Prerequisite: MATH 3161 or equivalent.

4120 Algebraic Topology (4 credits)

Fundamental groups, simplicial homology, Euler characteristic classification of surfaes, manifolds. Prerequisites: MATH 3170 and MATH 3110/4110.

4162 Rings and Modules (3 credits)

 

4163 Universal Algebra (4 credits)

Universal algebras, congruencies, lattices, distributive lattices, modular lattices, Boolean algebras, subdirectly irreducible algebras, Mal'cev theorems, varieties, Birkhoff theorem. Prerequisites: MATH 3170 and either MATH 3040 or MATH 3060.

4166 Group Theory (4 credits)

Groups and homomorphisms, isomorphism theorems, symmetric groups and G-sets, the Sylow theorems, normal series, fundamental theorem of finitely generated abelian groups. Prerequisite: MATH 3170.

4270 Hilbert Spaces (4 credits)

Schwarz and triangle inequalities, Reisz lemma, subspaces and othogonal projections, orthonormal bases, spectrum of bounded linear operators, compact, self-adjoint, normal and unitary operators, spectral theorem and, if time permits, unbounded operators. Also, if time permits, applications to partial differential equations, physics and engineering. Prerequisite: MATH 3260/4260 or MATH 3110/4110.

4290 Dynamical Systems (4 credits)

Topological and measure theoretic dynamical systems; properties and invariants of systems; symbolic dynamics; Ergodic Theorems; applications. Prerequisites: MATH 3120, MATH 4110, MATH 3260, or MATH 4260.

4300 Graduate Seminar (1 to 4 credits)

Students research a topic of their choosing with the aid of a faculty member, and then prepare and present a formal lecture on the subject. Prerequisite: graduate standing or consent of the instructor.

4501 Functional Analysis (4 credits)

Advanced topics in structure of linear spaces; Banach spaces; Hahn-Banach Theorem and Duality; Uniform Boundedness Theorem; Open Mapping and Closed Graph Theorems; Stone-Weierstrass Theorem; Topics in Hilbert Spaces. Prerequisite: MATH 4280.

4700 Special Topics in Mathematics (1 to 4 credits)

 

4701 Combinatorial Algorithms (4 credits)

Basic enumeration techniques; representations of combinatorial objects; algorithms for searching, sorting, generating combinatorial objects, graph algorithms.

4705 Special Topics Applied Math (1 to 5 credits)

varying selected advanced topics in mathematics, depending on student demand. Possible alternatives include of variations, partail differential equations, algebraic topology, differential manifolds, special functions.

4991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

Cannot be arranged for any course that appears in course schedule for that particular year.

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

Research projects undertaken in conjunction with a faculty member.

5000 Doctoral Seminar (3 credits)

Techniques, methods used in mathematical, computing research. Includes proofs, bibliographic searching, writing styles, what constitutes an acceptable dissertation.

5991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

Cannot be arranged for any course that appears in the regular course schedule for that particular year.

5995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

Research leading to a dissertation.


Physics & Astronomy
1011 21st Cen Physics & Astrnmy I (0 or 4 credits)

First class in a three-quarter sequence that explores the meaning of discoveries in astronomy and physics, and how they shape modern research into our knowledge of the nature of the universe. Students will survey the nature of fundamental physical forces and their inter-relationships in terms of observed phenomena and theory, regarding origin and evolution of the universe and its contents. In this way students will be exposed to the essential concepts of modern physics and astronomy, including mechanics, electromagnetism, nuclear forces, planet, star and galaxy evolution and theories for the creation of the Universe.

1012 21st Cen Physics & Astrnmy II (0 or 4 credits)

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that explores of the meaning of discoveries in astronomy and physics, and how they shape modern research into our knowledge of the nature of the universe. Students will survey the nature of fundamental physical forces and their inter-relationships in terms of observed phenomena and theory, regarding origin and evolution of the universe and its contents. In this way students will be exposed to the essential concepts of modern physics and astronomy, including mechanics, electromagnetism, nuclear forces, planet, star and galaxy evolution and theories for the creation of the Universe.

1013 21st Cen Physics & Astrnmy III (0 or 4 credits)

Third class in a three quarter sequence that explores the meaning of discoveries in astronomy and physics, and how they shape modern research into our knowledge of the nature of the universe. Students will survey the nature of fundamental physical forces and their inter-relationships in terms of observed phenomena and theory, regarding origin and evolution of the universe and its contents. In this way students will be exposed to the essential concepts of modern physics and astronomy, including mechanics, electromagnetism, nuclear forces, planet, star and galaxy evolution and theories for the creation of the Universe.

1050 Descriptive Astronomy (4 credits)

Introduction to the cosmos, including stars, galaxies, and origin and fate of universe; constellations and observing techniques. Includes laboratory and observing sessions at Chamberlin Observatory's 20-inch refractor telescope.

1070 Solar System Astronomy (4 credits)

Introduction to advances in knowledge of atmospheres, surfaces and interiors of other planets in our solar system and elsewhere; emphasis on interpretation and significance of discoveries for the nonspecialist. Includes observing at Chamberlin Observatory. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 is helpful.

1090 Cosmology (4 credits)

Companion to PHYS 1070. Discoveries of modern era concerning stars, galaxies, and origin and fate of universe, to aid appreciation of new discoveries. Open to majors and nonmajors in the sciences. Includes scheduled observing at Chamberlin Observatory. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 is helpful.

1111 General Physics I (0 or 5 credits)

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214).

1112 General Physics II (0 or 5 credits)

This is the second of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in rotational motion, torque, vibrations, fluids, heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and particles and matter waves. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214).

1113 General Physics III (0 or 5 credits)

This is the third of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in electric fields and forces, electric current and circuits, magnetism, light and optics, and the physics of atoms. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214).

1200 Physics Preparatory (2 credits)

This course is strongly recommended to everyone considering a major in physics and astronomy. It introduces students to problems, techniques, and tools used in physics and astronomy and offers an overview of the research carried out in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. High-school physics knowledge is not required.

1211 University Physics I (0 or 5 credits)

First of a three-quarter sequence. Kinematics, vectors, force, energy and work, linear momentum, rotation of rigid bodies. Required for all physics and engineering majors and recommended for all science majors who are also required to take calculus. The course includes a rigorous calculus-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena studied in the lecture course. Through the use of experimental apparatus, computerized instrumentation and data acquisition, data analysis and graphical representation, students use the observed phenomena to exemplify the laws of physics. Physics theory and other relevant background information are explored individually by students in weekly prelab exercises. Students learn to write introductory-level laboratory reports and become familiar with good laboratory technique. Emphasis for this lab is on mechanics. Corequisite(s): MATH 1951.

1212 University Physics II (0 or 5 credits)

Second of a three-quarter sequence. Gravitation, fluids; oscillatory motion; waves; thermal physics. Required for all physics and engineering majors and recommended for all science majors who are also required to take calculus. The lab portion of this course is a continuation of the PHYS 1211 lab portion and builds on laboratory skills and knowledge from that course. Emphasis for this lab is on waves, oscillations, sound, fluids and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1211. Co-requisite: MATH 1952.

1213 University Physics III (0 or 5 credits)

Third of a three-quarter sequence. Electrostatics, electric circuits, magnetism and electromagnetism; electromagnetic waves. Required for all physics and engineering majors and recommended for all science majors who are also required to take calculus. The lab portion of this course is a continuation of the PHYS 1221 and 1222 lab portions and builds on the students' laboratory skills and knowledge from those labs. Emphasis for this lab is on electricity, magnetism and circuits. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1212. Corequisite(s): MATH 1953.

1214 Univ Physics III for Engineers (4 credits)

This is the third course of a 3-quarter sequence and is for Engineers only; this is equivalent to PHYS 1213, but does not include lab component. Electrostatics, electric circuits, magnetism and electromagnetism; electromagnetic waves. Required for all engineering majors. Prerequisite: PHYS 1212. Corequisite: MATH 1953.

1991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

1995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

2011 Circuits I (3 credits)

Cross-listed with ENEE 2011. An introduction to electrical circuits analysis and design. Emphasis is on definitions of basic variables, passive circuit components and the ideal operational amplifier. DC analysis of circuits and circuit theorems are stressed. AC signals are introduced. Computer analysis software is integrated throughout the course. Co-requisites: PHYS 1213 or 1214, MATH 1953, PHYS 2015 or instructor's permission.

2015 Engineering Applications I (1 credits)

Cross-listed with ENEE 2015. Laboratory program introduces electronic test equipment, verifies circuit theorems and practices elementary interface circuit design. Co-requisite: PHYS 2011 or instructor's permission.

2021 Circuits II (3 credits)

Cross-listed with ENEE 2021. AC analysis of linear circuits to include circuit theorems via classical and transform techniques. Emphasis is on Laplace transform, including use of pole-zero and Bode diagrams to analyze and design circuits, including multiple filters (single-pole cascade, Butterwork, Chebyshev), and step response circuits. Phasors applications to sinusoidal steady state analysis and AC power. Computer analysis software is used as an aid to circuit design. Prerequisites: PHYS 2011, 2015. Co-requisites: PHYS 2025, MATH 2070.

2025 Engineering Applications II (1 credits)

Cross-listed with ENEE 2025. Laboratory program practicing time and frequency domain analysis and design techniques on step response and filter problems. Applications to instrumentation and circuits. Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Co-requisite: PHYS 2021 or instructor's permission.

2051 Bio-Astronomy of Solar Systems (4 credits)

The nature of our solar system, and those of recently discovered solar systems around other stars, will be examined using the tools of modern physics and astronomy, with a focus on biogenic opportunities in these diverse environments. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1111 or PHYS 1211 or instructor's permission.

2052 Stellar Physics (4 credits)

The physics of stars will be examined using the tools of modern physics and astronomy, with the focus on their structure, interiors, origin and evolution, including single and multiple star systems, white dwarf, neutron stars and black holes. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1111 or PHYS 1211 or instructor's permission.

2053 Galaxies and Cosmology (4 credits)

Modern discoveries involving galaxies in our universe and cosmological theories based on these and particle physics findings will be examined using the tools of modern physics and astronomy. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1111 or PHYS 1211 or instructor's permission.

2061 Telescopes and Instrumentation (4 credits)

The student will develop and refine facility and experience with telescopes, software, methods, catalogs, libraries, astronomical instrumentation and assorted contents of the universe, including ground-based and space-based telescopes and detector systems. Observing projects included; use of the Student Astronomy Lab and/or internet telescope(s) for observing projects and variable star monitoring, plus occasional use of the 20 inch Clark/Saegmuller refractor or Mt. Evans reflectors for observing, measuring and practicing public instruction. Math tools include: algebra, statistics, Excel, Mathcad, IDL, C++, etc. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1112 or PHYS 1212 or instructor's permission.

2062 Astronomy with Digital Cameras (4 credits)

The revolution brought about with digital recording systems has revolutionized astronomy by providing access to faint source imaging and in-depth astronomical spectroscopy not possible during the photographic era. This course will train students to apply this technology to problems associated with light and spectrum measurement that facilitate tests of modern astrophysical theories. Each student will select an observing project to develop during the term, pursue data collection and analysis at the Student Astronomy Lab or other telescope(s), and report results on a personal website and/or in poster format. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050, or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1113 or PHYS 1213 or instructor's permission.

2063 Observing & Data Analysis (4 credits)

In this summer-only class, the student will learn fundamentals of astronomical research with hands-on observing and data analysis opportunities at DU's Meyer-Womble Observatory located high atop Mt. Evans, 35 miles west of campus. Good health is essential to withstand the rigors of high altitude and nighttime work at this remarkable site. Contact the instructor for guidelines and details. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1111 or PHYS 1211 or instructor's permission.

2110 Intro Computational Physics (3 credits)

Application of computational mathematics packages and spreadsheet programs to a variety of physics problems; numerical differentiation and integration, solution of differential equations, matrix calculations, computer graphics. Includes lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214; MATH 1953.

2251 Modern Physics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Topics covered: Introduction to special relativity; photons, de Broglie wavelength, Heisenberg uncertainty principles, quantum numbers and invariance principles; introduction to quantum physics of atoms, molecules, solids and nuclei; radioactive decay; elementary particles. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214; MATH 1953. Co-requisite: MATH 2070.

2252 Modern Physics II (3 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Topics covered: Advanced topics in quantum mechanics: particle in a box, tunneling, variational principle, symmetry; introduction to statistical physics and thermodynamics: ensembles, Bose-Einstein condensation, super-fluidity, superconductivity, nano-science; introduction to chaos: maps, stability analysis, bifurcations; introduction to computational physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2251. Co-requisite: PHYS 2260

2259 Uncertainty and Error Analysis (1 credits)

In this course, students will build on the laboratory experience gained in University Physics Lab. Students will learn why uncertainty analysis is crucial to reducing and correcting errors in science. Additionally, students will develop the theory behind, and learn how to carry out, uncertainty and data analysis calculations. Uncertainty analysis topics include statistical analysis of data, propagation of error, the normal distribution, rejection of data, weighted averages, least-squares fitting, covariance and correlation, the binomial and Poisson distributions, and the chi-squared test. Strong emphasis for this course is placed on having students develop independence with their laboratory skills, as well as preparing students for Modern Physics Lab (PHYS 2260). Prerequisites: PHYS 1213 or 1214; MATH 1953 or 1963.

2260 Modern Physics Lab (1 credits)

Laboratory to accompany PHYS 2252. Students will perform laboratories that demonstrate special relativity, the wave/particle duality of light, the quantization of charge, and the discrete nature of energy levels in bound systems. Laboratories include the Michelson-Morley experiment, spectroscopy, blackbody radiation, laser diffraction and the double slit experiment, the photoelectric effect, the Millikan oil drop experiment, the charge-to-mass ratio of the electron, and the Franck-Hertz experiment. Students will apply uncertainty and error analysis to real experimental data. Strong emphasis for this lab is placed on having students develop independence with their laboratory skills. A Windows-based laptop computer is required for this lab. Prerequisites: PHYS 2259; MATH 2070. Co-requisite: PHYS 2252.

2270 Topics in Modern Physics (3 credits)

Introduction to quantum physics of atoms, molecules, solids and nuclei; radioactive decay; elementary particles. Prerequisite: PHYS 2251.

2300 Physics of the Body (3 credits)

This is the first course required for a Medical Physics Minor. Muscles and forces; physics of the skeleton; energy, heat, work and power of the body; osmosis and kidneys; lungs and breathing; cardiovascular system; electrical and magnetic signals in the body. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213, or 1214.

2311 Intermediate Lab I (3 credits)

In this lab, students learn to develop laboratory instrumentation to make physical measurements using electronic circuitry and the personal computer. Laboratory exercises include a review of DC circuits including transistors, LabVIEW programming, the PC parallel port, AC circuits and the oscilloscope, operational amplifiers and the RS-232C serial port. Strong emphasis for this lab is placed on having students develop independence with their laboratory skills. A Windows-based laptop computer is required. Prerequisites: PHYS 2260; MATH 2070.

2312 Intermediate Lab II (3 credits)

This lab is a continuation of PHYS 2311 and builds heavily on the concepts learned during that first quarter. Laboratory exercises include using the personal computer, LabVIEW programming, and electronic circuitry for single point and waveform data acquisition including the Fast Fourier Transform, GPIB and serial devices, transducers, controls and feedback systems, counting, and timing. Strong emphasis for this lab is placed on having students develop independence with their laboratory skills. A Windows-based laptop computer is required. Prerequisite: PHYS 2311.

2313 Intermediate Lab III (3 credits)

This lab is the final lab in the Intermediate Lab sequence. Students leverage the knowledge gained in the first two quarters to perform physics experiments using electronic circuitry and the personal computer. It is expected that students will be independent in their ability to perform in the laboratory. An Windows-based laptop computer is required. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2312.

2340 Medical Imaging Physics (3 credits)

This is the second course required for a Medical Physics Minor, following Physics of the Body (PHYS 2300). X-rays; nuclear medicine instrumentation; radiography and fluoroscopy; computed tomography; ultrasound; magnetic resonance imaging; radiobiology. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214; PHYS 2300.

2510 Applied Mechanics I (3 credits)

First of a three-quarter sequence. Co-listed with ENME 2510. Statics of particles, equivalent systems of forces, centroids and center of gravity, frames and machines, friction, moments of inertia, method of virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum, central force motion, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. Prerequisite: PHYS 1211.

2520 Applied Mechanics II (3 credits)

Second of a three-quarter sequence. Co-listed with ENME 2520. Statics of particles, equivalent systems of forces, centroids and center of gravity, frames and machines, friction, moments of inertia, method of virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods for particles and systems of particles, angular momentum, central force motion, implusive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. Prerequisites: PHYS 2510, ENGR 3610.

2530 Applied Mechanics III (3 credits)

Third of a three-quarter sequence. Statics of particles, equivalent systems of forces, centroids and center of gravity, frames and machines, friction, moments of inertia, method of virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods from particles and systems of particles, angular momentum, central force motion, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. Prerequisites: PHYS 2520, ENGR 3610.

2555 Mechanics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Topics include motion of a particle and of particle systems, conservative and nonconservative forces, statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, gravitation, moving coordinate systems, small vibrations and normal modes, and introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213, or 1214; MATH 2070.

2556 Mechanics II (4 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Topics include motion of a particle and of particle systems, conservative and nonconservative forces, statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, gravitation, moving coordinate systems, small vibrations and normal modes, and introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2555.

2700 Topics in Physics & Astronomy (3 credits)

Offered irregularly, depending on demand. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite(s): instructor's permission.

2762 Atmospheric Physics II (3 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Basic atmospheric physics, including radiative transfer, thermodynamics, air motions and cloud physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2761.

2810 Radioactivity Ionizing Rad (3 credits)

Ionizing radiation and its biological effects; detection and measurement of radiation, natural background and risk. Prerequisite: PHYS 1213 or 1214 or instructor's permission.

2830 Natural Optics (3 credits)

An investigation of naturally occurring optical phenomena with an emphasis on observational characteristics and causes. Prerequisite: PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214 or instructor's permission.

2910 Undergraduate Seminar (1 to 5 credits)

Offered irregularly, depending on demand. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

2991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

3050 Descriptive Astronomy Tchrs (4 credits)

Primarily for teachers in service who are planning to teach science in either elementary or secondary schools. Can apply toward a graduate degree. Preparation for teaching earth science and general sciences. Meets jointly with PHYS 1050 in lecture and laboratory; extra term project required. Motions of earth, time, calendar, telescopes, solar system, stars and galaxies. Includes laboratory and observations at Chamberlin Observatory. Prerequisite: instructor's permission required.

3111 Quantum Physics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. The Schrödinger equation: interpretation of wave functions; the uncertainty principle; stationary states; the free particle and wave packets; the harmonic oscillator; square well potentials. Hilbert space: observables, commutator algebra, eigenfunctions of a Hermitian operator; the hydrogen atom and hydrogenic atoms. Prerequisites: PHYS 2252, 2260, 2556, 3612; MATH 2070.

3112 Quantum Physics II (4 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Angular momentum and spin; identical particles; the Pauli exclusion principle; atoms and solids: band theory; perturbation theory; the fine structure of hydrogen; the Zeeman effect; hyperfine splitting; the variational principle; the WKB approximation; tunneling; time dependent perturbation theory; emission and absorption of radiation. Scattering: partial wave analysis; the Born approximation. Prerequisite: PHYS 3111.

3270 Wksh Practical Astronomy (1 to 5 credits)

Capstone coursework featuring studies in experimental, computational, and/or theoretical work in astronomy and astrophysics.

3311 Adv Laboratory I (1 credits)

First of a three-quarter sequence. Advanced experimental techniques in physics. Meets with PHYS 2311. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

3312 Adv Laboratory II (1 credits)

Second of a three-quarter sequence. Advanced experimental techniques in physics. Meets with PHYS 2312. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

3313 Adv Laboratory III (1 credits)

Third of a three-quarter sequence. Advanced experimental techniques in physics. Meets with PHYS 2313. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

3411 Condensed Matter Physics I (3 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Crystal structure; crystal structure analysis; elastic properties; crystal defects and mechanical properties; thermal properties and phonons. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2252, 2260.

3412 Condensed Matter Physics II (3 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Free electron gas; energy bands; semiconductors; quasiparticles and excitations; dielectrics and ferroelectrics; magnetic properties; superconductivity, nanomaterials. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 3411.

3510 Analytical Mechanics (4 credits)

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213, or 1214; MATH 2070; consent of instructor.

3611 Electromagnetism I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Vector algebra; differential vector calculus (gradient, divergence and curl); integral vector calculus (gradient, divergence and Stokes’ Theorems); line, surface and volume integrals; Electrostatics: the electric field, electric potential, work and energy in electrostatics; method of images, boundary value problems and solutions to Laplace’s equation in Cartesian, spherical and cylindrical coordinates; multipole expansion of the electric potential; electric fields in matter: polarization; the electric displacement vector; boundary conditions, linear dielectrics. Magnetostatics: magnetic fields and forces. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213, or 1214; MATH 2070.

3612 Electromagnetism II (4 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Magnetic vector potential; magnetic fields in matter: magnetization; fields of magnetized objects; linear and nonlinear magnetic materials; electromotive force, Ohm’s law; electromagnetic induction; Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s equations; the displacement current; boundary conditions; the Poynting theorem; momentum and energy density of the fields; the Maxwell stress tensor; the wave equation and electromagnetic waves in vacuum and matter; absorption and dispersion; wave guides; the potential formulation and gauge transformations; retarded potentials; dipole radiation. Prerequisite: PHYS 3611.

3700 Topics in Physic & Astronomy (3 credits)

Offered irregularly, depending on demand. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite(s): instructor's permission.

3711 Optics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Gaussian optics and ray tracing; matrix methods and application to optical design; elementary theory of aberrations; light as electromagnetic wave, diffraction and interference; interferometers and their applications. Elementary theory of coherence; selected topics. May include laboratory work as appropriate. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214, MATH 2070.

3712 Optics II (2 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Gaussian optics and ray tracing; matrix methods and application to optical design; elementary theory of aberrations; light as electromagnetic wave, diffraction and interference; interferometers and their applications. Elementary theory of coherence; selected topics. May include laboratory work as appropriate. Prerequisite: PHYS 3711.

3781 Spectroscopy I (3 credits)

Classical and quantum mechanical radiation theory for atoms and molecules; spectral line profiles and curves of growth; examples from optical radiation of atmospheric gases from air and in laboratory. Prerequisite: bachelor's degree in science or engineering or upper-division course in modern physics.

3782 Spectroscopy II (3 credits)

Atomic and molecular energy levels and transition probabilities in optical spectrum using angular momentum techniques; examples from spectra of atmospheric gases. Prerequisite: PHYS 3781.

3841 Thermal Physics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Laws of thermodynamics; thermal properties of gases and condensed matter; kinetic theory of gases, classical and quantum statistics. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213 or PHYS 1214; MATH 2070.

3842 Thermal Physics II (2 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Laws of thermodynamics; thermal properties of gases and condensed matter; kinetic theory of gases, classical and quantum statistics. Prerequisite: PHYS 3841.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

4001 Introduction to Research I (1 or 2 credits)

This course is the first of the 3-course sequence designed to provide the opportunity of learning fundamental skills to conduct independent research in any physical science discipline. In this course, students review essential material in mathematical physics, learn basic programming techniques and improve upon their skills in literature search and scientific writing, especially proposal writing. Special in-class seminars in collaboration with the Penrose Library and Writing and Research Center are scheduled. Student are introduced to research conducted by Physics and Astronomy faculty so that they can choose a faculty member with whom to take on a Winter Research Project during the winter interterm and winter quarter as part of Introduction to Research II. Students must prepare and submit a research proposal before the end of the fall quarter.

4002 Introduction to Research II (1 to 3 credits)

This is the second of the 3-course sequence to provide the opportunity of learning fundamental skills to conduct independent research in any physical science discipline. In this course, students conduct an independent research or study project that they have outlined in the research proposal they submitted as part of Introduction to Research I under supervision of a faculty advisor of their choosing. At the same time, students have time to review issues that we face as researchers. Prerequisite: PHYS 4001 and consent of a faculty research advisor.

4003 Introduction to Research III (1 or 2 credits)

This is the third of the 3-course sequence to provide students with the opportunity of learning fundamental skills to conduct independent research in any physical science disciplines. In this course, students complete their Winter research project conducted as part of Introduction to Research II and present the results in writing as a term paper and in oral presentation as part of the Departmental Colloquia. Special in-class sessions in collaboration with the Writing and Research Center are included. Prerequisite: PHYS 4002.

4111 Quantum Mechanics I (3 credits)

 

4112 Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits)

 

4113 Quantum Mechanics III (3 credits)

 

4141 Adv Quantum Mechanics I (3 credits)

 

4142 Adv Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits)

 

4143 Adv Quantum Mechanics III (3 credits)

 

4211 Atomic&Molecular Structure I (3 credits)

 

4212 Atomic&Molecular Structure II (3 credits)

 

4213 Atomic&Molecular Structure III (3 credits)

 

4251 Intro to Astrophysics I (3 credits)

 

4252 Intro to Astrophysics II (3 credits)

 

4253 Intro to Astrophysics III (3 credits)

 

4411 Advanced Condensed Matter I (3 credits)

Materials structure; structure analysis; elastic properties; defects; plastic mechanical properties; thermal properties and phonons; free electron gas; energy bands and Fermi surfaces; crystalline and amorphous semiconductors; quasiparticles and excitations; electrical properties and ferroelectrics; magnetic properties and ferromagnetics; classical and high-Tc superconductors; other advanced materials. Co-requisite: PHYS 4111.

4412 Advanced Condensed Matter II (3 credits)

Materials structure; structure analysis; elastic properties; defects; plastic mechanical properties; thermal properties and phonons; free electron gas; energy bands and Fermi surfaces; crystalline and amorphous semiconductors; quasiparticles and excitations; electrical properties and ferroelectrics; magnetic properties and ferromagnetics; classical and high-Tc superconductors; other advanced materials. Co-requisite: PHYS 4112.

4413 Advanced Condensed Matter III (3 credits)

Materials structure; structure analysis; elastic properties; defects; plastic mechanical properties; thermal properties and phonons; free electron gas; energy bands and Fermi surfaces; crystalline and amorphous semiconductors; quasiparticles and excitations; electrical properties and ferroelectrics; magnetic properties and ferromagnetics; classical and high-Tc superconductors; other advanced materials. Co-requisite: PHYS 4113.

4511 Advanced Dynamics I (4 credits)

 

4512 Advanced Dynamics II (3 credits)

 

4551 Mathematical Physics I (3 credits)

 

4552 Mathematical Physics II (3 credits)

 

4553 Mathematical Physics III (3 credits)

 

4611 Adv Electricity & Magnetism I (3 credits)

 

4612 Adv Electricity & Magnetism II (3 credits)

 

4613 Adv Electricity&Magnetism II (3 credits)

 

4641 Fields & Particles in Space I (3 credits)

 

4642 Fields & Particles in Space II (3 credits)

 

4750 Seminar in Physics (1 credits)

 

4752 Smr Atomic & Molecular Physics (1 credits)

 

4753 Smr Atmospheric Spectroscopy (1 credits)

 

4754 Condensed Matter Physics (1 credits)

 

4755 Smr Theoretical Physics (1 credits)

 

4811 Statistical Mechanics I (4 credits)

Fundamentals of thermodynamics, microcanonical and canonical ensemble, quantum formulation noninteracting particle systems.

4812 Statistical Mechanics II (3 credits)

 

4813 Statistical Mechanics III (3 credits)

 

4910 Special Topics Physics (1 to 5 credits)

 

4991 Independent Study (M.S.) (1 to 10 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (M.S.) (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (M.S.) (1 to 10 credits)

 

6991 Independent Study (PhD) (1 to 10 credits)

 

6995 Independent Research (PhD) (1 to 10 credits)

 


Core Courses