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Division of Natural Sciences & MathematicsDepartment of Physics & Astronomy

Degree Programs

Physics & Astronomy

Course Descriptions

1011 21st Century Physics & Astronomy I (0 or 4 credits)

First class in a three-quarter sequence that explores the meaning of discoveries in astronomy and physics, and how they shape modern research into our knowledge of the nature of the universe. Students will survey the nature of fundamental physical forces and their inter-relationships in terms of observed phenomena and theory, regarding origin and evolution of the universe and its contents. In this way students will be exposed to the essential concepts of modern physics and astronomy, including mechanics, electromagnetism, nuclear forces, planet, star and galaxy evolution and theories for the creation of the Universe.

1012 21st Century Physics & Astronomy II (0 or 4 credits)

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that explores of the meaning of discoveries in astronomy and physics, and how they shape modern research into our knowledge of the nature of the universe. Students will survey the nature of fundamental physical forces and their inter-relationships in terms of observed phenomena and theory, regarding origin and evolution of the universe and its contents. In this way students will be exposed to the essential concepts of modern physics and astronomy, including mechanics, electromagnetism, nuclear forces, planet, star and galaxy evolution and theories for the creation of the Universe.

1013 21st Century Physics & Astronomy III (0 or 4 credits)

Third class in a three quarter sequence that explores the meaning of discoveries in astronomy and physics, and how they shape modern research into our knowledge of the nature of the universe. Students will survey the nature of fundamental physical forces and their inter-relationships in terms of observed phenomena and theory, regarding origin and evolution of the universe and its contents. In this way students will be exposed to the essential concepts of modern physics and astronomy, including mechanics, electromagnetism, nuclear forces, planet, star and galaxy evolution and theories for the creation of the Universe.

1050 Descriptive Astronomy (4 credits)

Introduction to the cosmos, including stars, galaxies, and origin and fate of universe; constellations and observing techniques. Includes laboratory and observing sessions at Chamberlin Observatory's 20-inch refractor telescope.

1070 Solar System Astronomy (4 credits)

Introduction to advances in knowledge of atmospheres, surfaces and interiors of other planets in our solar system and elsewhere; emphasis on interpretation and significance of discoveries for the nonspecialist. Includes observing at Chamberlin Observatory. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 is helpful.

1090 Cosmology (4 credits)

Companion to PHYS 1070. Discoveries of modern era concerning stars, galaxies, and origin and fate of universe, to aid appreciation of new discoveries. Open to majors and nonmajors in the sciences. Includes scheduled observing at Chamberlin Observatory. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 is helpful.

1111 General Physics I (0 or 5 credits)

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214).

1112 General Physics II (0 or 5 credits)

This is the second of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in rotational motion, torque, vibrations, fluids, heat and thermodynamics, kinetic theory, and particles and matter waves. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214).

1113 General Physics III (0 or 5 credits)

This is the third of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in electric fields and forces, electric current and circuits, magnetism, light and optics, and the physics of atoms. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/1212/1213 or 1214).

1200 Physics Preparatory (2 credits)

This course is strongly recommended to everyone considering a major in physics and astronomy. It introduces students to problems, techniques, and tools used in physics and astronomy and offers an overview of the research carried out in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. High-school physics knowledge is not required.

1211 University Physics I (0 or 5 credits)

First of a three-quarter sequence. Kinematics, vectors, force, energy and work, linear momentum, rotation of rigid bodies. Required for all physics and engineering majors and recommended for all science majors who are also required to take calculus. The course includes a rigorous calculus-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena studied in the lecture course. Through the use of experimental apparatus, computerized instrumentation and data acquisition, data analysis and graphical representation, students use the observed phenomena to exemplify the laws of physics. Physics theory and other relevant background information are explored individually by students in weekly prelab exercises. Students learn to write introductory-level laboratory reports and become familiar with good laboratory technique. Emphasis for this lab is on mechanics. Corequisite(s): MATH 1951.

1212 University Physics II (0 or 5 credits)

Second of a three-quarter sequence. Gravitation, fluids; oscillatory motion; waves; thermal physics. Required for all physics and engineering majors and recommended for all science majors who are also required to take calculus. The lab portion of this course is a continuation of the PHYS 1211 lab portion and builds on laboratory skills and knowledge from that course. Emphasis for this lab is on waves, oscillations, sound, fluids and thermodynamics. Prerequisite: PHYS 1211. Co-requisite: MATH 1952.

1213 University Physics III (0 or 5 credits)

Third of a three-quarter sequence. Electrostatics, electric circuits, magnetism and electromagnetism; electromagnetic waves. Required for all physics and engineering majors and recommended for all science majors who are also required to take calculus. The lab portion of this course is a continuation of the PHYS 1221 and 1222 lab portions and builds on the students' laboratory skills and knowledge from those labs. Emphasis for this lab is on electricity, magnetism and circuits. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1212. Corequisite(s): MATH 1953.

1214 University Physics III for Engineers (4 credits)

This is the third course of a 3-quarter sequence and is for Engineers only; this is equivalent to PHYS 1213, but does not include lab component. Electrostatics, electric circuits, magnetism and electromagnetism; electromagnetic waves. Required for all engineering majors. Prerequisite: PHYS 1212. Corequisite: MATH 1953.

1991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

1995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

2011 Circuits I (3 credits)

Cross-listed with ENEE 2011. An introduction to electrical circuits analysis and design. Emphasis is on definitions of basic variables, passive circuit components and the ideal operational amplifier. DC analysis of circuits and circuit theorems are stressed. AC signals are introduced. Computer analysis software is integrated throughout the course. Co-requisites: PHYS 1213 or 1214, MATH 1953, PHYS 2015 or instructor's permission.

2015 Engineering Applications I (1 credits)

Cross-listed with ENEE 2015. Laboratory program introduces electronic test equipment, verifies circuit theorems and practices elementary interface circuit design. Co-requisite: PHYS 2011 or instructor's permission.

2021 Circuits II (3 credits)

Cross-listed with ENEE 2021. AC analysis of linear circuits to include circuit theorems via classical and transform techniques. Emphasis is on Laplace transform, including use of pole-zero and Bode diagrams to analyze and design circuits, including multiple filters (single-pole cascade, Butterwork, Chebyshev), and step response circuits. Phasors applications to sinusoidal steady state analysis and AC power. Computer analysis software is used as an aid to circuit design. Prerequisites: PHYS 2011, 2015. Co-requisites: PHYS 2025, MATH 2070.

2025 Engineering Applications II (1 credits)

Cross-listed with ENEE 2025. Laboratory program practicing time and frequency domain analysis and design techniques on step response and filter problems. Applications to instrumentation and circuits. Prerequisite: PHYS 2011. Co-requisite: PHYS 2021 or instructor's permission.

2051 Bio-Astronomy of Solar Systems (4 credits)

The nature of our solar system, and those of recently discovered solar systems around other stars, will be examined using the tools of modern physics and astronomy, with a focus on biogenic opportunities in these diverse environments. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1111 or PHYS 1211 or instructor's permission.

2052 Stellar Physics (4 credits)

The physics of stars will be examined using the tools of modern physics and astronomy, with the focus on their structure, interiors, origin and evolution, including single and multiple star systems, white dwarf, neutron stars and black holes. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1111 or PHYS 1211 or instructor's permission.

2053 Galaxies and Cosmology (4 credits)

Modern discoveries involving galaxies in our universe and cosmological theories based on these and particle physics findings will be examined using the tools of modern physics and astronomy. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1111 or PHYS 1211 or instructor's permission.

2061 Telescopes and Instrumentation (4 credits)

The student will develop and refine facility and experience with telescopes, software, methods, catalogs, libraries, astronomical instrumentation and assorted contents of the universe, including ground-based and space-based telescopes and detector systems. Observing projects included; use of the Student Astronomy Lab and/or internet telescope(s) for observing projects and variable star monitoring, plus occasional use of the 20 inch Clark/Saegmuller refractor or Mt. Evans reflectors for observing, measuring and practicing public instruction. Math tools include: algebra, statistics, Excel, Mathcad, IDL, C++, etc. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1112 or PHYS 1212 or instructor's permission.

2062 Astronomy with Digital Cameras (4 credits)

The revolution brought about with digital recording systems has revolutionized astronomy by providing access to faint source imaging and in-depth astronomical spectroscopy not possible during the photographic era. This course will train students to apply this technology to problems associated with light and spectrum measurement that facilitate tests of modern astrophysical theories. Each student will select an observing project to develop during the term, pursue data collection and analysis at the Student Astronomy Lab or other telescope(s), and report results on a personal website and/or in poster format. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050, or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1113 or PHYS 1213 or instructor's permission.

2063 Observing and Data Analysis (4 credits)

In this summer-only class, the student will learn fundamentals of astronomical research with hands-on observing and data analysis opportunities at DU's Meyer-Womble Observatory located high atop Mt. Evans, 35 miles west of campus. Good health is essential to withstand the rigors of high altitude and nighttime work at this remarkable site. Contact the instructor for guidelines and details. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1111 or PHYS 1211 or instructor's permission.

2110 Intro Computational Physics (3 credits)

Application of computational mathematics packages and spreadsheet programs to a variety of physics problems; numerical differentiation and integration, solution of differential equations, matrix calculations, computer graphics. Includes lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214; MATH 1953.

2251 Modern Physics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Topics covered: Introduction to special relativity; photons, de Broglie wavelength, Heisenberg uncertainty principles, quantum numbers and invariance principles; introduction to quantum physics of atoms, molecules, solids and nuclei; radioactive decay; elementary particles. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214; MATH 1953. Co-requisite: MATH 2070.

2252 Modern Physics II (3 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Topics covered: Advanced topics in quantum mechanics: particle in a box, tunneling, variational principle, symmetry; introduction to statistical physics and thermodynamics: ensembles, Bose-Einstein condensation, super-fluidity, superconductivity, nano-science; introduction to chaos: maps, stability analysis, bifurcations; introduction to computational physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2251. Co-requisite: PHYS 2260

2259 Uncertainty and Error Analysis (1 credits)

In this course, students will build on the laboratory experience gained in University Physics Lab. Students will learn why uncertainty analysis is crucial to reducing and correcting errors in science. Additionally, students will develop the theory behind, and learn how to carry out, uncertainty and data analysis calculations. Uncertainty analysis topics include statistical analysis of data, propagation of error, the normal distribution, rejection of data, weighted averages, least-squares fitting, covariance and correlation, the binomial and Poisson distributions, and the chi-squared test. Strong emphasis for this course is placed on having students develop independence with their laboratory skills, as well as preparing students for Modern Physics Lab (PHYS 2260). Prerequisites: PHYS 1213 or 1214; MATH 1953 or 1963.

2260 Modern Physics Lab (1 credits)

Laboratory to accompany PHYS 2252. Students will perform laboratories that demonstrate special relativity, the wave/particle duality of light, the quantization of charge, and the discrete nature of energy levels in bound systems. Laboratories include the Michelson-Morley experiment, spectroscopy, blackbody radiation, laser diffraction and the double slit experiment, the photoelectric effect, the Millikan oil drop experiment, the charge-to-mass ratio of the electron, and the Franck-Hertz experiment. Students will apply uncertainty and error analysis to real experimental data. Strong emphasis for this lab is placed on having students develop independence with their laboratory skills. A Windows-based laptop computer is required for this lab. Prerequisites: PHYS 2259; MATH 2070. Co-requisite: PHYS 2252.

2270 Topics in Modern Physics (3 credits)

Introduction to quantum physics of atoms, molecules, solids and nuclei; radioactive decay; elementary particles. Prerequisite: PHYS 2251.

2300 Physics of the Body (3 credits)

This is the first course required for a Medical Physics Minor. Muscles and forces; physics of the skeleton; energy, heat, work and power of the body; osmosis and kidneys; lungs and breathing; cardiovascular system; electrical and magnetic signals in the body. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213, or 1214.

2311 Intermediate Lab I (3 credits)

In this lab, students learn to develop laboratory instrumentation to make physical measurements using electronic circuitry and the personal computer. Laboratory exercises include a review of DC circuits including transistors, LabVIEW programming, the PC parallel port, AC circuits and the oscilloscope, operational amplifiers and the RS-232C serial port. Strong emphasis for this lab is placed on having students develop independence with their laboratory skills. A Windows-based laptop computer is required. Prerequisites: PHYS 2260; MATH 2070.

2312 Intermediate Lab II (3 credits)

This lab is a continuation of PHYS 2311 and builds heavily on the concepts learned during that first quarter. Laboratory exercises include using the personal computer, LabVIEW programming, and electronic circuitry for single point and waveform data acquisition including the Fast Fourier Transform, GPIB and serial devices, transducers, controls and feedback systems, counting, and timing. Strong emphasis for this lab is placed on having students develop independence with their laboratory skills. A Windows-based laptop computer is required. Prerequisite: PHYS 2311.

2313 Intermediate Lab III (3 credits)

This lab is the final lab in the Intermediate Lab sequence. Students leverage the knowledge gained in the first two quarters to perform physics experiments using electronic circuitry and the personal computer. It is expected that students will be independent in their ability to perform in the laboratory. An Windows-based laptop computer is required. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2312.

2340 Medical Imaging Physics (3 credits)

This is the second course required for a Medical Physics Minor, following Physics of the Body (PHYS 2300). X-rays; nuclear medicine instrumentation; radiography and fluoroscopy; computed tomography; ultrasound; magnetic resonance imaging; radiobiology. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214; PHYS 2300.

2510 Applied Mechanics I (3 credits)

First of a three-quarter sequence. Co-listed with ENME 2510. Statics of particles, equivalent systems of forces, centroids and center of gravity, frames and machines, friction, moments of inertia, method of virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum, central force motion, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. Prerequisite: PHYS 1211.

2520 Applied Mechanics II (3 credits)

Second of a three-quarter sequence. Co-listed with ENME 2520. Statics of particles, equivalent systems of forces, centroids and center of gravity, frames and machines, friction, moments of inertia, method of virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods for particles and systems of particles, angular momentum, central force motion, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. Prerequisites: PHYS 2510, ENGR 3610.

2530 Applied Mechanics III (3 credits)

Third of a three-quarter sequence. Statics of particles, equivalent systems of forces, centroids and center of gravity, frames and machines, friction, moments of inertia, method of virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods from particles and systems of particles, angular momentum, central force motion, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. Prerequisites: PHYS 2520, ENGR 3610.

2555 Mechanics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Topics include motion of a particle and of particle systems, conservative and nonconservative forces, statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, gravitation, moving coordinate systems, small vibrations and normal modes, and introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213, or 1214; MATH 2070.

2556 Mechanics II (4 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Topics include motion of a particle and of particle systems, conservative and nonconservative forces, statics and dynamics of rigid bodies, gravitation, moving coordinate systems, small vibrations and normal modes, and introduction to Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2555.

2700 Topics in Physics & Astronomy (3 credits)

Offered irregularly, depending on demand. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite(s): instructor's permission.

2762 Atmospheric Physics II (3 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Basic atmospheric physics, including radiative transfer, thermodynamics, air motions and cloud physics. Prerequisite: PHYS 2761.

2810 Radioactivity Ionizing Rad (3 credits)

Ionizing radiation and its biological effects; detection and measurement of radiation, natural background and risk. Prerequisite: PHYS 1213 or 1214 or instructor's permission.

2830 Natural Optics (3 credits)

An investigation of naturally occurring optical phenomena with an emphasis on observational characteristics and causes. Prerequisite: PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214 or instructor's permission.

2910 Undergraduate Seminar (1 to 5 credits)

Offered irregularly, depending on demand. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

2991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

3050 Descriptive Astronomy for Teachers (4 credits)

Primarily for teachers in service who are planning to teach science in either elementary or secondary schools. Can apply toward a graduate degree. Preparation for teaching earth science and general sciences. Meets jointly with PHYS 1050 in lecture and laboratory; extra term project required. Motions of earth, time, calendar, telescopes, solar system, stars and galaxies. Includes laboratory and observations at Chamberlin Observatory. Prerequisite: instructor's permission required.

3111 Quantum Physics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. The Schrödinger equation: interpretation of wave functions; the uncertainty principle; stationary states; the free particle and wave packets; the harmonic oscillator; square well potentials. Hilbert space: observables, commutator algebra, eigenfunctions of a Hermitian operator; the hydrogen atom and hydrogenic atoms. Prerequisites: PHYS 2252, 2260, 2556, 3612; MATH 2070.

3112 Quantum Physics II (4 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Angular momentum and spin; identical particles; the Pauli exclusion principle; atoms and solids: band theory; perturbation theory; the fine structure of hydrogen; the Zeeman effect; hyperfine splitting; the variational principle; the WKB approximation; tunneling; time dependent perturbation theory; emission and absorption of radiation. Scattering: partial wave analysis; the Born approximation. Prerequisite: PHYS 3111.

3270 Workshop inimp Practical Astronomy (1 to 5 credits)

Capstone coursework featuring studies in experimental, computational, and/or theoretical work in astronomy and astrophysics.

3311 Adv Laboratory I (1 credits)

First of a three-quarter sequence. Advanced experimental techniques in physics. Meets with PHYS 2311. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

3312 Adv Laboratory II (1 credits)

Second of a three-quarter sequence. Advanced experimental techniques in physics. Meets with PHYS 2312. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

3313 Adv Laboratory III (1 credits)

Third of a three-quarter sequence. Advanced experimental techniques in physics. Meets with PHYS 2313. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

3411 Condensed Matter Physics I (3 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Crystal structure; crystal structure analysis; elastic properties; crystal defects and mechanical properties; thermal properties and phonons. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 2252, 2260.

3412 Condensed Matter Physics II (3 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Free electron gas; energy bands; semiconductors; quasiparticles and excitations; dielectrics and ferroelectrics; magnetic properties; superconductivity, nanomaterials. Prerequisite(s): PHYS 3411.

3510 Analytical Mechanics (4 credits)

Lagrangian and Hamiltonian mechanics. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213, or 1214; MATH 2070; consent of instructor.

3611 Electromagnetism I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Vector algebra; differential vector calculus (gradient, divergence and curl); integral vector calculus (gradient, divergence and Stokes’ Theorems); line, surface and volume integrals; Electrostatics: the electric field, electric potential, work and energy in electrostatics; method of images, boundary value problems and solutions to Laplace’s equation in Cartesian, spherical and cylindrical coordinates; multipole expansion of the electric potential; electric fields in matter: polarization; the electric displacement vector; boundary conditions, linear dielectrics. Magnetostatics: magnetic fields and forces. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213, or 1214; MATH 2070.

3612 Electromagnetism II (4 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Magnetic vector potential; magnetic fields in matter: magnetization; fields of magnetized objects; linear and nonlinear magnetic materials; electromotive force, Ohm’s law; electromagnetic induction; Faraday’s law; Maxwell’s equations; the displacement current; boundary conditions; the Poynting theorem; momentum and energy density of the fields; the Maxwell stress tensor; the wave equation and electromagnetic waves in vacuum and matter; absorption and dispersion; wave guides; the potential formulation and gauge transformations; retarded potentials; dipole radiation. Prerequisite: PHYS 3611.

3700 Topics in Physic & Astronomy (3 credits)

Offered irregularly, depending on demand. May be taken more than once for credit. Prerequisite(s): instructor's permission.

3711 Optics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Gaussian optics and ray tracing; matrix methods and application to optical design; elementary theory of aberrations; light as electromagnetic wave, diffraction and interference; interferometers and their applications. Elementary theory of coherence; selected topics. May include laboratory work as appropriate. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213 or 1214, MATH 2070.

3712 Optics II (2 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Gaussian optics and ray tracing; matrix methods and application to optical design; elementary theory of aberrations; light as electromagnetic wave, diffraction and interference; interferometers and their applications. Elementary theory of coherence; selected topics. May include laboratory work as appropriate. Prerequisite: PHYS 3711.

3781 Spectroscopy I (3 credits)

Classical and quantum mechanical radiation theory for atoms and molecules; spectral line profiles and curves of growth; examples from optical radiation of atmospheric gases from air and in laboratory. Prerequisite: bachelor's degree in science or engineering or upper-division course in modern physics.

3782 Spectroscopy II (3 credits)

Atomic and molecular energy levels and transition probabilities in optical spectrum using angular momentum techniques; examples from spectra of atmospheric gases. Prerequisite: PHYS 3781.

3841 Thermal Physics I (4 credits)

First of a two-quarter sequence. Laws of thermodynamics; thermal properties of gases and condensed matter; kinetic theory of gases, classical and quantum statistics. Prerequisites: PHYS 1113, 1213 or PHYS 1214; MATH 2070.

3842 Thermal Physics II (2 credits)

Second of a two-quarter sequence. Laws of thermodynamics; thermal properties of gases and condensed matter; kinetic theory of gases, classical and quantum statistics. Prerequisite: PHYS 3841.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

4001 Introduction to Research I (1 or 2 credits)

This course is the first of the 3-course sequence designed to provide the opportunity of learning fundamental skills to conduct independent research in any physical science discipline. In this course, students review essential material in mathematical physics, learn basic programming techniques and improve upon their skills in literature search and scientific writing, especially proposal writing. Special in-class seminars in collaboration with the Penrose Library and Writing and Research Center are scheduled. Student are introduced to research conducted by Physics and Astronomy faculty so that they can choose a faculty member with whom to take on a Winter Research Project during the winter interterm and winter quarter as part of Introduction to Research II. Students must prepare and submit a research proposal before the end of the fall quarter.

4002 Introduction to Research II (1 to 3 credits)

This is the second of the 3-course sequence to provide the opportunity of learning fundamental skills to conduct independent research in any physical science discipline. In this course, students conduct an independent research or study project that they have outlined in the research proposal they submitted as part of Introduction to Research I under supervision of a faculty advisor of their choosing. At the same time, students have time to review issues that we face as researchers. Prerequisite: PHYS 4001 and consent of a faculty research advisor.

4003 Introduction to Research III (1 or 2 credits)

This is the third of the 3-course sequence to provide students with the opportunity of learning fundamental skills to conduct independent research in any physical science disciplines. In this course, students complete their Winter research project conducted as part of Introduction to Research II and present the results in writing as a term paper and in oral presentation as part of the Departmental Colloquia. Special in-class sessions in collaboration with the Writing and Research Center are included. Prerequisite: PHYS 4002.

4111 Quantum Mechanics I (3 credits)

 

4112 Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits)

 

4113 Quantum Mechanics III (3 credits)

 

4141 Adv Quantum Mechanics I (3 credits)

 

4142 Adv Quantum Mechanics II (3 credits)

 

4143 Adv Quantum Mechanics III (3 credits)

 

4211 Atomic&Molecular Structure I (3 credits)

 

4212 Atomic&Molecular Structure II (3 credits)

 

4213 Atomic&Molecular Structure III (3 credits)

 

4251 Intro to Astrophysics I (3 credits)

 

4252 Intro to Astrophysics II (3 credits)

 

4253 Intro to Astrophysics III (3 credits)

 

4411 Advanced Condensed Matter I (3 credits)

Materials structure; structure analysis; elastic properties; defects; plastic mechanical properties; thermal properties and phonons; free electron gas; energy bands and Fermi surfaces; crystalline and amorphous semiconductors; quasiparticles and excitations; electrical properties and ferroelectrics; magnetic properties and ferromagnetics; classical and high-Tc superconductors; other advanced materials. Co-requisite: PHYS 4111.

4412 Advanced Condensed Matter II (3 credits)

Materials structure; structure analysis; elastic properties; defects; plastic mechanical properties; thermal properties and phonons; free electron gas; energy bands and Fermi surfaces; crystalline and amorphous semiconductors; quasiparticles and excitations; electrical properties and ferroelectrics; magnetic properties and ferromagnetics; classical and high-Tc superconductors; other advanced materials. Co-requisite: PHYS 4112.

4413 Advanced Condensed Matter III (3 credits)

Materials structure; structure analysis; elastic properties; defects; plastic mechanical properties; thermal properties and phonons; free electron gas; energy bands and Fermi surfaces; crystalline and amorphous semiconductors; quasiparticles and excitations; electrical properties and ferroelectrics; magnetic properties and ferromagnetics; classical and high-Tc superconductors; other advanced materials. Co-requisite: PHYS 4113.

4511 Advanced Dynamics I (4 credits)

 

4512 Advanced Dynamics II (3 credits)

 

4551 Mathematical Physics I (3 credits)

 

4552 Mathematical Physics II (3 credits)

 

4553 Mathematical Physics III (3 credits)

 

4611 Adv Electricity & Magnetism I (3 credits)

 

4612 Adv Electricity & Magnetism II (3 credits)

 

4613 Adv Electricity&Magnetism II (3 credits)

 

4641 Fields & Particles in Space I (3 credits)

 

4642 Fields & Particles in Space II (3 credits)

 

4750 Seminar in Physics (1 credits)

 

4752 Smr Atomic & Molecular Physics (1 credits)

 

4753 Smr Atmospheric Spectroscopy (1 credits)

 

4754 Condensed Matter Physics (1 credits)

 

4755 Smr Theoretical Physics (1 credits)

 

4811 Statistical Mechanics I (4 credits)

Fundamentals of thermodynamics, microcanonical and canonical ensemble, quantum formulation noninteracting particle systems.

4812 Statistical Mechanics II (3 credits)

 

4813 Statistical Mechanics III (3 credits)

 

4910 Special Topics Physics (1 to 5 credits)

 

4991 Independent Study (M.S.) (1 to 10 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (M.S.) (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (M.S.) (1 to 10 credits)

 

6991 Independent Study (PhD) (1 to 10 credits)

 

6995 Independent Research (PhD) (1 to 10 credits)