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Academic Writing Courses

Three unique opportunities to learn from the expert and elevate your academic writing abilities

For registration and questions, please contact cpd@du.edu or 303-871-4161

Jeanne Jacobs, Ph.D. delivers the expertise and techniques to increase your preparedness and confidence for academic writing -

Dr. Jacobs is currently offering the following courses:

 

Literature Review Flyer

Literature Reviews - What to include and what not to include, that is the question  

January 27, 5pm - 9pm - Ruffatto Hall, room 105, University of Denver Morgridge College of Education 

$100 for professionals, free for DU students 

Register online today!

Find out more information about Literature Reviews course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Students pursuing graduate degrees consume large quantities of literature that contribute to their understanding of a given topic. Turning around and sharing that information effectively in literature reviews can be challenging, but it is also critically important to the ultimate outcome of your work. Join Jeanne Jacobs in this workshop as she helps you to become a more discerning reader and also shares techniques to help you organize your literature and write compelling and credible literature reviews.

Mastering the purpose and structure of a literature review is easy; however, a literature review requires the author to integrate disciplined thinking, critical analysis,  organization skills, and writing proficiency. Literature reviews are integral to social science research proposals, dissertations, and journal articles—they provide readers with a well-documented framework for understanding a topic and research problem. In addition to demonstrating the author’s understanding of a given topic, a literature review serves four significant purposes: to introduce and define key concepts relevant to a research study; to provide a theoretical foundation for research questions and study design; to put forth an argument in favor of a particular research study with evidence from the literature to support it; and to explicitly state the significance of a study and the specific ways the study will advance existing knowledge (Bloomberg & Volpe, 2008; Rudestam & Newton, 2007).

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

This workshop will introduce you to the various steps of writing a literature review, including:

  • Defining a literature review and the role it plays in scholarship
  • Conducting a fruitful search for relevant literature
  • Annotating and organizing literature for easy retrieval
  • Synthesizing literature to systematically or stylistically explicate a particular research problem
  • Developing an outline for the literature review based on concepts, themes, or theories central to the research problem
  • Writing the literature review using APA conventions and citing relevant sources in support of claims

 

 


 

APA Style flyer

APA Style - What's love got to do with it?  

January 30, 8am-12pm - Ruffatto Hall, room 105, University of Denver Morgridge College of Education

$100 for professionals, free for DU students 

Register online today! 

Find out more information about APA Style Course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Students who pursue graduate degrees in the social sciences often have varying degrees of experience with APA Style. And yet, adhering to APA Style standards is critical to each student’s success. Join Jeanne Jacobs as she not only helps you to learn and use APA Style in your research and reporting, but to also gain an appreciation for its purpose and the structure it provides. Using APA Style requires a commitment to not only grammatical details, but also to a tradition of scholarly excellence. Jeanne shares how esteemed scholars “protect and love” their research participants and the scholars who have informed their work, as well as their readers and future scholars who may be interested in carrying on the tradition of excellence. Since 1929, the American Psychological Association (APA) has been entrusted to establish standards for scholarly writing in the behavioral and social sciences (American Psychological Association, 2010). APA is committed to the twin aspects of scholarship—the ethical and the practical. APA champions ethical principles designed to protect the interests of our research participants; the intellectual property of the researchers who have contributed to our scholarship; and our readers who depend on us to present accurate and reliable information (American Psychological Association, 2010). From a practical perspective, APA provides guidelines for reporting research results in a clear and consistent manner that can be understood by members of the social scientific community (American Psychological Association, 2010). Students pursuing graduate degrees in the social sciences are expected to not only master the ethical imperatives and writing conventions systematized by the APA, they also must commit to keeping up-to-date as these conventions change. Although a daunting task for many graduate students, those who expect to be taken seriously as scholars must demonstrate the same degree of rigor in mastering APA Style as they display in the development of disciplinary knowledge and research expertise. To make a meaningful contribution to knowledge in the social sciences, researchers join specific scholarly conversations; a decision that, despite its voluntary nature, demands adherence to traditional forms of communication upheld by APA. Through exercises and examples, Jeanne will provide you with a better understanding of APA Style and the ability to use it accurately and efficiently in your work.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

The workshop will introduce you to key aspects of APA Style, including:

  • Describing the origin and purpose of APA Style
  • Navigating the APA Publication Manual
  • Mastering:
    • Sources (avoiding plagiarism, formatting in text citations and references)
    • Grammar (voice, verb tense, subject/verb and noun/pronoun agreement)
    • Punctuation (periods, parentheses, quotation marks, and spacing)
    • Organization (heading levels)
    • Formatting (font, headers, line spacing, margins, and page numbers)

 


 

Disseration Proposal Flyer

Writing a Dissertation Proposal - From stumbling block to stepping stone 

April 13, 5pm - 9pm - Ruffatto Hall, room 105, University of Denver Morgridge College of Education 

$100 for professionals, free for DU students 

Register online today!

Find out more information Writing a Dissertation Proposal Course

COURSE DESCRIPTION

Once doctoral students have completed their coursework and comprehensive exams, the final step to earning a doctorate is the successful completion of a dissertation. However, before doctoral candidates can begin their dissertation research study they must write a proposal and receive approval from their committee members and, if applicable, the university’s institutional review board (IRB). Join Jeanne Jacobs as she helps you create a step-by-step strategy for successfully writing your dissertation proposal. A dissertation proposal is a persuasive “action plan” (Bloomberg & Volpe, 2008) for an original research study. Expectations for the format and length of dissertation proposals vary depending upon the program, committee, and research approach (i.e., quantitative or qualitative). Proposals for quantitative studies often represent the first three chapters of the standard five-chapter dissertation. Qualitative proposals may also serve as the first three chapters of the final dissertation; however, due to the emergent nature of qualitative inquiry, they often represent just the first chapter. Regardless of the format or research approach, all dissertation proposals must: clearly define a problem or issue; explicate the need and purpose for the proposed study; provide well conceptualized research questions; describe the research methodology; articulate the significance of the study (Creswell, 2013); and summarize each of the proposed dissertation chapters (Foss & Waters, 2007). Come away from this workshop with a clear vision of how to approach your dissertation proposal and the confidence to see it through.

LEARNING OBJECTIVES

In this workshop you will learn about each of the key sections of a dissertation proposal, their purpose, and what they must include, as well as tips for how to complete each section efficiently.

  • Problem statement
  • Purpose statement
  • Research questions
  • Literature review
  • Methodology section
  • Significance statement
  • An overview for each of the proposed dissertation chapters

 


 

SPEAKER INFORMATION

Jeanne Jacobs received a Ph.D. in Communication Studies from University of Denver in 2012. Over the past eight years, Dr. Jacobs has taught a variety of communication and qualitative research courses to undergraduate and graduate students at the University of Denver.  Her research and teaching commitments are synergistic and steeped in the emergent field of affect theory that is currently unfolding in the communication discipline. Dr. Jacobs is a critical ethnographer whose primary passion is classroom interactions between and among teachers and students.  In her dissertation, titled Fostering and Foreclosing Student Learning Potential: Portraits of Performativity, Emotion, and Relationality in the Classroom, Dr. Jacobs breaks new ground by crafting a nuanced conceptual framework of the relationship among communication, affect and the development of learning potential.  Dr. Jacobs is currently a freelance workshop facilitator, curriculum writer, and graduate coach assisting MCE graduate students who are completing their master's theses and doctoral dissertations.

Stay tuned for additional courses by Dr. Jacobs throughout 2016!

For registration and questions, please contact cpd@du.edu or 303-871-4161