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Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering & Computer Science

Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering & Computer Science

Course Descriptions

This site is provided for ease of access to course descriptions of the various courses required in the engineering programs, however, this may not include all of the courses offered. A full catalog of course descriptions can be found at myWeb.

Computer Science (COMP)
1101 Analytical Inquiry I (4 credits)

Students explore the use of mathematics and computer programming in creating animations. Students create animations on their laptop computers using animation software.

1571 Procedural Programming I (3 credits)

The C programming language is used to introduce fundamental procedural programming including engineering applications. Programming topics include an overview of computers and programming languages, variables and data types, arithmetic operators, input/output, comments, control structures, user-defined functions, scope, constants, file I/O, and pointers. Prerequisite: High School algebra.

1572 Procedural Programming II (3 credits)

The Java programming language is used to introduce object-oriented programming. Topics include fundamental object-oriented concepts, class design and implementation, inheritance, polymorphism, exceptions, and event-driven programming. Prerequisite: COMP 1571.

1670 Introduction to Computing (0 or 4 credits)

Overview of computing, including history and impact, use of computer as a tool in various disciplines, logical process of problem solving, and concepts of programming using a high-level language. Appropriate for students who wish to learn more about computers but are not planning to continue in computer science.

1671 Intro to Computer Science I (0 or 4 credits)

Characteristics of modern computers and their applications; analysis and solution of problems; structure programming techniques; introduction to classes, abstract data types and object-oriented programming. Prerequisite: high school algebra.

1672 Intro to Computer Science II (0 or 4 credits)

Advanced programming techniques; arrays, recursion, dynamic data structures, algorithm abstraction, object- oriented programming including inheritance and virtual functions. Prerequisite: COMP 1671.

1771 Intro to Comp Science 1 Honors (4 credits)

This is an honors section of Introduction to Computer Science 1 meant for incoming freshman who are already experienced in computer programming. This course is meant to be faster paced than its counterpart COMP 1672/1671. Prerequisites for this course include either AP credit in Java or at least one quarter of programming, or permission of instructor.

1991 Independent Study (1 credits)

 

1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2100 Technical Found-Digital Media (4 credits)

The course will provide the fundamental concepts of digital systems. Study of the number of systems and components of computer (hardware and firmware) and how they function to solve problems.

2300 Discrete Structures in CS (4 credits)

Discrete Structures in Computer Science Number systems and basic number theory, propositional and predicate logic, proof techniques, mathematical induction, sets, counting and discrete probability, case studies with applications from computer science, such as data representation, algorithm analysis and correctness, and system design.

2355 Intro to Systems Programming (4 credits)

The prerequisites for this class are a good understanding of imperative and object-oriented programming in Java. The prerequisites for this class include a good understanding of basic programming constructs, such as branches (if, switch), loops (for, while, do), exceptions (throw, catch), functions, objects, classes, packages, primitive types (int, float, boolean), arrays, arithmetic expressions and boolean operations. Computer organization is a parallel prerequisite; if possible students should register for both this course and COMP 2691. You must have a good understanding of basic data structures such as arrays, lists, sets, trees, graphs and hash-tables. This is a class on systems programming with focus on the C programming language and UNIX APIs. There will be programming assignments designed to make you use various Debian GNU/Linux system APIs. Programming assignments involve writing code in C or C++. Prerequisite: COMP 2673.

2370 Intro Algorithms & Data Struct (4 credits)

Performance analysis of algorithms; data structures and their physical storage representation; recursive techniques; stacks, queues, lists, trees, sets, graphs; sorting and searching algorithms. Prerequisites: MATH 2200 or COMP 2300 and COMP 2673.

2400 Software Tools (4 credits)

Introduction to tools for program development and efficient use of a workstation environment. Topics include UNIX commands, emacs environment, X-windows, separate compilation of large projects, user-defined libraries, makefiles, intelligent debugging, perl, HTML, rcs/sccs, tcl/tk and assorted additional topics. Prerequisite: COMP 2370 or instructor's permission.

2555 Computer Forensics (4 credits)

Data recovery techniques, auditing methods and services, data seizure, preservation of computer evidence, reconstruction of events, and information warfare. Prerequisite: COMP 1672 or programming experience.

2673 Intro to Computer Science III (0 or 4 credits)

An introduction to several advanced topics in computer science. Topics vary from year to year and may include any of the following: theory of computing, cryptography, databases, computer graphics, graph theory, game theory, fractals, mathematical programming, wavelets, file compression, computational biology, genetic algorithms, neural networks, simulation and queuing theory, randomized algorithms, parallel computing, complexity analysis, numerical methods. Prerequisite: COMP 1672 or COMP 1771.

2691 Intro to Computer Organization (4 credits)

Assembly language programming - simple operations, addressing modes, looping, arrays, subprograms; logic design - multiplexers, decoders/encoders, flip-flops, counters, shifters, sequential network design. Prerequisite: COMP 1672 or COMP 1771.

2701 Topics in Computer Science (1 to 5 credits)

 

2901 Computing and Society (4 credits)

This course is designed to explore the social implications of computing practices, organization and experience. These topics and other issues are correlated with examples from the older and modern history of technology and science. Some formal experience with computing is assumed, but students who have a good familiarity with ordinary computing practice should be ready. Students are also expected to contribute their expertise in one or more of the areas of their special interest. Cross-listed with COMP 3901 and DMST 3901.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3000 Seminar: The Real World (1 credits)

Series of lectures by alumni and others on surviving culture shock when leaving the University and entering the job world. Open to all students regardless of major.

3200 Discrete Structures (4 credits)

Discrete mathematical structures and non-numerical algorithms; graph theory, elements of probability, propositional calculus, Boolean algebras; emphasis on applications to computer science. Cross-listed as MATH 3200. Prerequisites: MATH 2200 or COMP 2300 and COMP 1672 or COMP 1771.

3221 Automata & Formal Language I (4 credits)

Introduction to computability, effective procedures, formal languages, undecidability; finite automata, regular languages. Prerequisite: MATH 3200 or COMP 3200.

3222 Automata & Formal Language II (4 credits)

Pushdown automata and context-free languages; Turing machines; introduction to computational complexity. Prerequisite: COMP 3221.

3341 Multimedia Systems (4 credits)

This course covers fundamental issues in design and implementation of multimedia applications. This course also covers technologies in multimedia systems such as multimedia data representation, compression, coding, networking, data management, and I/O technologies. Prerequisite: CPMP 3361.

3351 Programming Languages (4 credits)

Programming language as a component of software development environment; binding, scope, lifetime, value and type of a variable; run-time structure - static, stack-based and dynamic languages; parameter passing - call by reference, value, result, value-result and name; subprogram parameters; role played by side effects, dangling pointers, aliases and garbage; garbage collection; data abstraction - study of object-oriented, functional, and logic languages. Prerequisites: COMP 2370, COMP 2691, and COMP 2355.

3352 Elements of Compiler Design (4 credits)

Techniques required to design and implement a compiler; lexical analysis, syntactic analysis, optimization, storage allocation, code generation. Prerequisite: COMP 3351.

3353 Compiler Construction (4 credits)

Design and implementation of a major piece of software relevant to compilers. Prerequisite: COMP 3352.

3354 Introduction to C Programming (4 credits)

Data types and operators, control structures, modularization through functions and multifile programs, operating system interfacing, and issues relating to large programming projects. Prerequisite: COMP 2370.

3361 Operating Systems I (4 credits)

Operating systems functions and concepts; processes, process communication, synchronization; processor allocation, memory management in multiprogramming, time sharing systems. Prerequisites: COMP 2355, COMP 2370, and COMP 2691.

3362 Operating Systems II (4 credits)

Prerequisite: COMP 3361.

3363 Operating Systems III (4 credits)

 

3371 Adv Data Struct & Algorithm (4 credits)

Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms Design and analysis of algorithms; asymptotic complexity, recurrence equations, lower bounds; algorithm design techniques such as incremental, divide and conquer, dynamic programming, randomization, greedy algorithms, etc. Prerequisite(s): COMP 2370, MATH 3200.

3381 Software Engineering I (4 credits)

An introduction to software engineering. Topics include software processes, requirements, design, development, validation and verification and project management. Prerequisite: COMP 2370.

3382 Software Engineering II (4 credits)

Continuation of COMP 3381. Topics include component-based software engineering, model-driven architecture, and service-oriented architecture. Prerequisite: COMP 3381.

3400 Advanced Unix Tools (4 credits)

Design principles for tools used in a UNIX environment. Students gain experience building tools by studying the public domain versions of standard UNIX tools and tool- building facilities. Prerequisites: knowledge of C and csh (or another shell), and familiarity with UNIX. Prerequisite: COMP 2400.

3410 World Wide Web Programming (4 credits)

Creating WWW pages with HTML, accessing user-written programs via CGI scripts, creating forms, image maps and tables, and Java programming principles and techniques. Prerequisite: COMP 2355.

3421 Database Organization & Mgmt I (4 credits)

An introductory class in databases explaining what a database is and how to use one. Topics include database design, ER modeling, database normalization, relational algebra, SQL, physical organization of records and clocks, heap files, sorted files, hashing, extendible hashing, linear hashing and B trees. Each student will design, load, query and update a nontrivial database using the Oracle DMBS. Prerequisite: COMP 2370.

3422 Database Org & Mgmt II (4 credits)

A course in underlying database management system methodology. Topics covered include: linear hashing, disk-based sorting, system catalogs, query processing and optimization, transaction processing, buffer management, concurrency control, recovery, physical DB design and tuning, distributed databases and parallel databases. A significant implementation project is assigned. Prerequisite: COMP 3421.

3423 Database Org & Mgmt III (4 credits)

 

3501 Intro Artificial Intelligence (4 credits)

Programming in LISP and Prolog with applications to artificial intelligence; fundamental concepts of artificial intelligence; emphasis on general problem-solving techniques including state-space representation, production systems, and search techniques. Prerequisites: MATH 2200, COMP 2370.

3503 Topics-Artificial Intelligence (4 credits)

 

3570 Intro to Numerical Methods (4 credits)

Algorithmic approach to numerical problems, round-off error analysis, solution of systems of linear equations, roots of equations, interpolation and approximation, numerical integration, and the numerical solution of ordinary and partial differential equations. Cross-listed as MATH 3571. Prerequisites: MATH 1952 or MATH 1962, MATH 2060 and COMP 1672.

3621 Computer Networking (4 credits)

An introduction to computer networks with an emphasis on Internet protocols. Topics include; network topologies, routing, Ethernet, Internet protocol, sockets, operating system impact and client/server implementations. Prerequisites: COMP 2355 and COMP 2370. Co-requisite: COMP 3361.

3693 Computer Architecture (4 credits)

Functioning of communication between large-scale components of a computer system. Prerequisite: COMP 2691.

3701 Topics in Computer Graphics (4 credits)

 

3702 Topics in Database (4 credits)

 

3703 Topics-Artificial Intelligence (4 credits)

 

3704 Advanced Topics: Systems (4 credits)

 

3705 Topics in Computer Science (1 to 4 credits)

 

3706 Intro to Computer Algebra (4 credits)

Introduction to computer algebra, the algorithmic solution of mathematical problems; use of computer algebra software (MAPLE or MATHEMATICA); algorithms for the analysis and manipulation of polynomial expressions; algorithms for manipulation of algebraic and trigonometric expressions; algorithms for differentiation and integration; applications to calculus and differential equations. Cross-listed as MATH 3706. Prerequisites: MATH 2070 and COMP 1671.

3709 Topics in Computer Security (4 credits)

 

3801 Introduction Computer Graphics (4 credits)

Introduction to Computer Graphics Fundamentals of graphics hardware, scan conversion algorithms, 2-D and 3-D viewing transformations, windows, viewports, clipping algorithms, mathematics for computer graphics, graphics programming using a standard API. Prerequisite(s): COMP 2370, MATH 1952 or 1962, and MATH 2060.

3802 Advanced Computer Graphics (4 credits)

Polygonal meshes, hidden line/surface removal, shading and illumination models, real time graphics, assorted advanced topics such as parametric curves and surfaces, ray tracing, anti-aliasing, etc. Prerequisite(s): COMP 3801 and MATH 2080.

3821 Game Programming I (4 credits)

An introduction to computer game programming. Use of a game engine to create 3D computer games. Topics to include game scripting, simple 3D asset creation, incorporation of assets, keyboard/mouse event handling, animation, game phases and score keeping. Prerequisite: COMP 2370.

3822 Game Programming II (4 credits)

An introduction to computer game engine programming. Major class goal is to understand how game engines are created by building subsets of a game engine. Non-exhaustive set of topics include how terrains are generated, how animations are supported, how particle systems are implemented, how physics systems are coded, and how support is provided for higher level scripting languages. All coding will be done in low-level graphics languages. Prerequisites: COMP 3801 and COMP 3821.

3904 Internship/Co-Op in Computing (0 to 10 credits)

Practical experience in designing, writing and/or maintaining substantial computer programs under supervision of staff of University Computing and Information Resources Center. Prerequisites: COMP 2370 and approval of internship committee (see department office).

3991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

Cannot be arranged for any course that appears in the regular course schedule for that particular year.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4210 Theory of Computation (3 credits)

 

4221 Automata & Formal Language I (3 credits)

 

4222 Automata & Formal Language I (3 credits)

 

4262 Adv Cobol & 4th Gen Language (3 credits)

 

4263 Systems Analysis & Design (3 credits)

 

4352 Elements of Compiler Design (3 credits)

 

4353 Compiler Construction (3 credits)

 

4362 Operating Systems II (4 credits)

Continuation of COMP 3361. Case studies of existing operating systems programming. Prerequisite(s): COMP 3621

4363 Operating Systems III (3 credits)

 

4371 Adv Data Struct & Algorithms (4 credits)

 

4372 Theory of Algorithms (4 credits)

NP-completeness; lower bound theory; approximation algorithms; amortized complexity and data structures, randomized algorithms. Assorted topics such as string algorithms, graph algorithms, linear programming, computational geometry. Prerequisite(s): COMP 3371.

4373 Automata & Formal Language I (3 credits)

 

4381 Software Engineering I (3 credits)

 

4382 Software Engineering II (3 credits)

 

4383 Software Engineering III (3 credits)

 

4384 Secure Software Engineering (4 credits)

This course is concerned with systematic approaches for the design and implementation of secure software. While topics such as cryptography, networking, network protocols and large scale software development are touched upon, this is not a course on those topics. Instead, this course is on identification of potential threats and vulnerabilities early in the design cycle. The emphasis in this course is on methodologies and paradigms for identifying and avoiding security vulnerabilities, formally establishing the absence of vulnerabilities, and ways to avoid security holes in new software. There are programming assignments designed to make students practice and experience secure software design and development. Prerequisites: COMP 3381 & COMP 4555. COMP 3621 is highly recommended. Students must be able to implement complex programs in C, C++ and Java.

4410 World Wide Web Programming (3 credits)

 

4422 Database Org & Mgmt II (3 credits)

 

4423 Database Org & Mgmt III (4 credits)

Advanced topics including transaction processing, online transaction processing benchmarks, distributed databases, parallel databases, client server databases, object-oriented databases, multi-attribute indexing. Prerequisite(s): COMP 3422

4502 Intelligent Tutor Systems (3 credits)

 

4503 Topics-Artificial Intelligence (3 credits)

 

4573 Scientific Computation (3 credits)

 

4600 Seminar in Computer Science (2 credits)

Preparation and presentation of lectures on some aspect of current research in computer science; topics not generally encountered in formal courses, may include robotics, pattern recognition, parallel processing, computer applications. 10- to 15- page paper with bibliography required.

4621 Computer Networking (3 credits)

 

4694 Adv Computer Architecture (3 credits)

 

4701 Special Tpcs-Computer Graphics (1 to 4 credits)

 

4702 Advanced Topics-Database (3 credits)

 

4703 Adv Topics-Artificial Intell (3 credits)

 

4704 Advanced Topics-Systems (3 to 4 credits)

 

4705 Advanced Topics-Programming (1 to 4 credits)

 

4706 Intro to Symbolic Manipulation (3 credits)

 

4707 Math Methods in Comp Algebra (4 credits)

Mathematical theory and algorithms used to design modern computer algebra systems; includes selected topics from: integer algorithms, greatest common divisor algorithms for polynomials, polynomial factorization algorithm, resultant computation and application, polynomial decomposition, and the Risch integration algorithm. Cross listed with MATH 3707. Prerequisite(s): COMP 3706 or MATH 3706

4708 Special Topics-VLSI (3 credits)

 

4709 Special Tpcs-Computer Security (3 credits)

 

4801 Intro to Computer Graphics (3 credits)

 

4802 Advanced Computer Graphics (3 credits)

 

4991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

Cannot be arranged for any course that appears in regular course schedule for that particular year.

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 17 credits)

Research projects undertaken in conjunction with a faculty member.

5000 Doctoral Seminar (3 credits)

Discussion of techniques and methods used in mathematical and computing research; includes proofs, bibliographic searching, writing styles, what constitutes and acceptable thesis.

5991 Independent Research (1 to 17 credits)

 

5995 Independent Research (1 to 17 credits)

 


Bio Engineering (ENBI)
3100 Bioengineering System Design (1 to 3 credits)

This course will prepare students to participate in a capstone engineering design project. They will learn the ethical treatment of patients, identify and survey the needs of a patient population, identify leading projects, form a design team, discuss human factors issues, and develop an initial strategy for project design.

3500 Biofluids (4 credits)

The application of fluid dynamics theory and design to problems within the biomedical community. Specific topics covered include the mechanics of inhaled therapeutic aerosols, basic theory of circulation and blood flow, foundations in biotechnology and bioprocessing, and controlled drug delivery.

3510 Biomechanics (4 credits)

An introduction to the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and systems. Specific topics covered include: analysis of the human musculoskeletal system as sensors, levers, and actuators; joint articulations and their mechanical equivalents; kinematic and kinetic analysis of human motion; introduction to modeling human body segments and active muscle loading for analysis of dynamic activities; mechanical properties of hard and soft tissues; mechanical and biological consideration for repair and replacement of soft and hard tissue and joints; orthopedic implants. Prerequisites: ENME 2410, ENME 2520, and ENME 2541.

3800 Topics in Bioengineering (1 to 5 credits)

Special topics in Bioengineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

4500 Biofluids (4 credits)

The application of fluid dynamics theory and design to problems within the biomedical community. Specitic topics covered include the mechanics of inhaled therapeutic aerosols, basic theory of circulation and blood flow, foundations in biotechnology and bioprocessing, and controlled drug delivery.

4510 Biomechanics (4 credits)

An introduction to the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and systems. Specific topics covered include: Analysis of the human musculoskeletal system as sensors, levers, and actuators; Joint articulations and their mechanical equivalents; Kinematic and kinetic analysis of human motion; Introduction to modeling human body segments and active muscle loading for analysis of dynamic activities; Mechanical properties of hard and soft tissues; Mechanical and biological consideration for repair and replacement of soft and hard tissue and joints; Orthopedic implants.

4800 Adv Topics (Bioengineering) (1 to 5 credits)

Various topics in Bioengineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

4991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 credits)

 


Computer Engineering (ENCE)
1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2101 Digital Design (0 to 3 credits)

Basic logic concepts. Boolean algebra, truth tables and logic diagrams. Karnaugh maps; programmable devices including ROM's, PLA's and PAL's; data selectors and multiplexors; flip-flops, and memory design of sequential logic circuits. State diagrams, counters, latches and registers; realization of sequential and arbitrary counters; monostable multivibrators. Course includes engineering ethics. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENEE 2021 or permission of instructor.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3100 Advanced Digital System Design (0 or 4 credits)

Design of logic machines. Finite state machines, gate array designs, ALU and control unit designs, microprogrammed systems. Hardware design of digital circuits using SSI and MSI chips. Introduction to probability and statistics. Application of probability and stochastic processes for cache and paging performance. Laboratories incorporate specification, top-down design, modeling, implementation and testing of actual digital design systems hardware. Simulation of circuits using VHDL before actual hardware implementation. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101.

3210 Microprocessor Systems I (4 credits)

Introduction to microprocessors and to the design and operation of computer systems. A study of the microprocessor and its basic support components. Analysis of CPU architectures of modern computers. Assembly language programming. Use of an assembler and other development tools for programming and developing microprocessor-based systems. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101.

3220 Microprocessor Systems II (4 credits)

Introduction to microprocessors and to the design and operation of computer systems. A study of the microprocessor and its basic support components. Analysis CPU architectures of modern computers. Assembly language programming. Use of an assembler and other development tools for programming and developing microprocessor-based systems. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENCE 3210.

3225 Digital and Microprocessor Sys (4 credits)

Introduction to Hardware Design Language (HDL). Language syntax and synthesis. Applications related to digital system implementation are developed. Project. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101 or instructor's permission.

3231 Embedded Systems Programming (4 credits)

Design, construction and testing of microprocessor systems. Hardware limitations of the single-chip system. Includes micro-controllers, programming for small systems, interfacing, communications, validating hardware and software, microprogramming of controller chips, design methods and testing of embedded systems. Prerequisite: ENCE 3220.

3241 Computer Organization (3 credits)

Organization of digital computers. Memory, register transfer and data path. Arithmetic Logic Unit. Computer architecture. Control unit. I/O systems. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101.

3250 HDL Modeling & Synthesis (3 credits)

Introduction to Hardware Design Language (HDL). Language syntax and synthesis. Applications related to digital system implementation are developed. Project. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101 or instructor's permission.

3261 Fault Tolerant Computing (3 credits)

Basic concepts of dependable computing. Reliability of nonredundant and redundant systems. Dealing with circuit-level defects. Logic-level fault testing and tolerance. Error detection and correction. Diagnosis and reconfiguration for system-level malfunctions. Degradation management. Failure modeling and risk assessment.

3321 Network Design (4 credits)

Introduction to network components. Layering of network architecture. Analysis of Local Area Network (LAN) concepts and architecture based on IEEE standards. Design principles including switching and multiplexing techniques, physical link, signal propagation, synchronization, framing and error control. Application of probability and statistics in error detecting and control. Ethernet, Token-ring, FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface), ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode), ISDN (Integrated Service Data Networks). Prerequisite: ENEE 3111, ENCE 2101 or permission of instructor.

3501 VLSI Design (3 credits)

Design of Very Large Scale Integration systems. Examination of layout and simulation of digital VLSI circuits using a comprehensive set of CAD tools in a laboratory setting. Studies of layouts of CMOS combinational and sequential circuits using automatic layout generators. Fundamental structures of the layout of registers, adders, decoders, ROM, PLA's, counters, RAM and ALU. Application of statistics and probability to chip performance. CAD tools allow logic verification and timing simulation of the circuits designed. Prerequisite: ENCE 3220.

3610 Multimedia Systems (3 credits)

Interactive multimedia technologies include hardware, software, standards, concepts and issues, compression, decompression, user interface design, query by content, multimedia indexing, and distributed multimedia.

3620 Computer Vision (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts in image processing and computer vision. First, an introduction to low-level image analysis methods, including radiometry and geometric image formation, edge detection, feature detection, and image segmentation are presented. Then, geometric based image transformations (e.g., image warping and morphing) for image synthesis will be presented in the course. Furthermore, methods for reconstructing three-dimensional scenes including camera calibration, Epipolar geometry, and stereo feature matching are introduced. Other important topics include optical flow, shape from shading, and three-dimensional object recognition. In conclusion, students learn and practice image processing and computer vision techniques that can be used in other areas such as robotics, pattern recognition, and sensor networks. Prerequisite: ENEE 3311.

3630 Pattern Recognition (4 credits)

This class provides an introduction to classical pattern recognition. Pattern recognition is the assignment of a physical object or event to one of several prescribed categories. Application include automated object recognition in image and videos, face identification, and optical character recognition. Major topics include: Bayesian decision theory, Parametric estimation and supervised learning, Linear discriminant functions, Nonparametric methods, Feature extraction for representation and classification, Support Vector Machines.

3830 Topics in Computer Engineering (1 to 5 credits)

Special topics in computer engineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

Topics in computer engineering investigated under faculty supervision. May be taken more than once. Students must obtain and complete an Independent Study form from the Office of the Registrar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

4100 High Speed Digital Design (3 credits)

Fundamental topics related to the development of high speed digital systems. Topics include signal integrity and reliability related to crosstalk, parasitics, and electromagnetic interference caused by device clocking speed and system complexity. Project.

4231 Embedded Systems Programming (4 credits)

Design, construction and testing of microprocessor systems. Hardware limitations of the single-chip system. Includes micro-controllers, programming for small systems, interfacing, communications, validating hardware and software, microprogramming of controller chips, design methods and testing of embedded systems.

4300 Mixed Signal Design & Testing (3 credits)

Design, analysis, and implementation of testable mixed- signal systems. The test specification process and design for test (DfT) techniques. Digital, analog and DSP based testing. Measurement accuracy and data analysis. Use of simulation tools to design and verify systems.

4311 Image Processing & Application (3 credits)

Covers methods for coding, storing and filtering images via digital computer, sampling, understanding and pattern recognition. Project.

4341 Distributed Systems (3 credits)

Fundamentals of distributed systems, distributed computing models, distributed file and directory services, distributed systems design and implementation issues, reliability and availability, and fault tolerance. Case studies in distributed systems are covered. Project. Prerequisite: ENCE 3320.

4421 Robot Computer Vision (3 credits)

Fundamental techniques for computer vision applied to robotics. Examines image formation, filtering, processing, boundary detection, image segmentation, texture analysis, shape from shading, object modeling, stereo vision, motion, and optical flow, shape description and object recognition (classification). Topics in sensor design, physics and geometry for perception, and perception systems. Project.

4501 Adv. VLSI Design (3 credits)

Advanced techniques in the fabrication and design of VLSI circuits and systems. Modeling of parasitic components. Floor-planning, clock distribution, routing, and low power design. Prerequisite: ENCE 3501 or permission of instructor.

4800 Advanced Topics (CPE) (1 to 5 credits)

Various topics in computer engineering as announced. May be taken more than once.

4991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 credits)

 


Electrical Engineering (ENEE)
1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2011 Circuits I (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2011) An introduction to electrical circuits analysis and design. Emphasis is on definitions of basic variables, passive circuit components and the ideal operational amplifier. DC analysis of circuits and circuit theorems are stressed. AC signals are introduced. Computer analysis software is integrated throughout the course. A relevant topic in engineering ethics is also explored. Co-requisites: PHYS 1213/1214, MATH 1953, ENEE 2015 or permission of instructor.

2015 Engineering Applications I (1 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2012) Laboratory program introduces electronic test equipment, verifies circuit theorems and practices elementary interface circuit design. Corequisite: ENEE 2011 or permission of instructor.

2021 Circuits II (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2021) AC analysis of linear circuits to include circuit theorems via classical and transform techniques. Emphasis is placed on the Laplace transform, including use of pole-zero and Bode diagrams to analyze and design circuits, including multiple filters (single-pole cascade, Butterworth, Chebyshev), and step-response circuits. Phasors applications to sinusoidal steady state analysis and AC power. Computer analysis software is used as an aid to circuit design. A relevant topic in engineering ethics is also explored. Prerequisites: ENEE 2011, ENEE 2015. Co-requisites: MATH 2070, ENEE 2025.

2025 Engineering Applications II (1 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2025) Laboratory program practicing time and frequency domain analysis and design techniques on step response and filter problems. Applications to instrumentation and circuits. Prerequisites: ENEE 2011, ENEE 2015. Corequisite: ENEE 2021 or permission of instructor.

2211 Electronics (4 credits)

Circuit behavior of semiconductor devices. Bipolar and field-effect transistors and their models; basic physical explanation of the functioning of these devices; large- and- small-signal analysis of practical circuits; electronic design using both hand and computer methods of calculation and design; biasing methods for amplifier circuits; power supplies and current-source circuits. Design laboratory. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, ENEE 2025.

2222 Advanced Electronics (3 credits)

High frequency transistor models and determination of parameters; Laplace and Fourier analyses of common amplifier circuits; design and analysis of broad-band amplifiers and of multistage amplifiers. Basic feedback topologies; Nyquist, root-locus and Bode plot investigations of stability; introduction to amplifier noise; active filter design; sinusoidal oscillators. Prerequisite: ENEE 2211.

2611 Engineering Electromagnetics (4 credits)

The study of Maxwell's equations and their experimental and theoretical foundations. Topics include Static electromagnetics fields, time-varying electromagnetic fields, wave propagation, transmission lines, and antennas. Prerequisites: PHYS 1213/1214 and ENGR 3610.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3011 Physical Electronics (0 or 4 credits)

The basic physical concepts of electronics, electrons and holes in semiconductors, transport and optical processes. Concentration on device concepts, including material synthesis and device processing, P-N junction diodes, junctions with other materials, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors (JFET, MESFET, MOSFET) and optoelectronic effect transistors (JFET, MESFET, MOSFET) and optoelectronic devices (lasers, detectors). Prerequisites: CHEM 1010/1610, PHYS 1213/1214 or permission of instructor.

3030 Optoelectronics (4 credits)

The active and passive optical elements. Includes principles of light, optical sources (LED, LASER, Fiber Laser), optical fibers, photodetectors (APD, PIN, MSM) and practical optical transmitter and receivers. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENEE 3011 or ENEE 2211 or permission of instructor.

3035 Photonics (4 credits)

Theory and techniques for the application of the optical electromagnetic spectrum from infrared to ultraviolet to engineering problems in communications, instrumentation and measurement. May include lasers, optical signal processing, holography, nonlinear optics, optical fiber communications, optical behavior of semiconductors, and similar topics in modern optics, depending on the interests and requirements of the students. Prerequisite: ENEE 2611 or instructor's permission.

3111 Signals & Systems (0 or 4 credits)

Introduces continuous time and discrete time linear system analysis, Fourier series, Fourier transforms and Laplace transforms. Specific engineering tools for discrete time linear system analysis include discrete time convolution, Z-transform techniques, discrete Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform (DFT/FFT), and the design and analysis of analog and digital filters for real-world signal processing applications. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, MATH 2070.

3130 Principles of Comm Systems (3 credits)

Introduction to the theory and analysis of communication systems. Emphasis on analog systems; application of probability and statistics, modulations and demodulations; noise and signal-to-noise ratio analysis; the measure of information, channel capacity, coding and design factors. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

3141 Digital Communications (3 credits)

Introductory course on modern digital communication systems. The basic communication system theory, probability and random processes, baseband digital data transmission, coherent and non-coherent digital modulation techniques and analysis of bit error probability. Bandwidth efficiency and transmission of digital data through band- limited channels. Prerequisite: ENEE 3111, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

3150 Communications Systems Lab (3 credits)

Communication systems experiments demonstrating classical and applied features of digital and analog communication principles. Includes digital and analog modulation techniques. A consolidated laboratory experience for students in the communication sequence with a capstone design of a complete communications process, including source coding, channel coding, transmission over media, reception and decoding, followed by a detailed performance analysis of the reliability of the sequence of processes. Corequisites: ENEE 3130, ENEE 3141.

3611 Antennas and Antenna Arrays (4 credits)

Maxwell's equations applied to antenna analysis and design. Topics include fundamental parameters of antennas, radiation integrals and auxiliary potential functions, analysis and design of linear wire antennas, loop antennas, arrays, broadband antennas, frequency independent antennas, aperture antennas and horns. Integrated lab included. Prerequisite: ENEE 2611.

3620 Optical Fiber Communications (4 credits)

A comprehensive treatment of the theory and behavior of basic constituents, such as optical fibers, light sources, photodetectors, connecting and coupling devices, and optical amplifiers. The basic design principles of digital and analog optical fiber transmission links. The operating principles of wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and the components needed for its realization. Descriptions of the architectures and performance characteristics of complex optical networks for connecting users with a wide range of transmission needs (SONET/SDH). Discussions of advanced optical communication techniques, such as soliton transmission, optical code-division multiplexing (optical CDMA) and ultra-fast optical time-division multiplexing (OTDM). Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENEE 3030 or permission of instructor.

3641 Electromagnetic Compatibility (4 credits)

The study of the design of electronic systems so that they operate compatibly with other electronic systems and also comply with various governmental regulations on radiated and conducted emissions. Topics may include: Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) requirements for electronic systems; non-ideal behavior of components; radiated emissions and susceptibility; conducted emissions and susceptibility; shielding and system design for EMC. Includes integrated lab. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111, ENEE 2611 and ENEE 2222.

3646 CAD of Microwave Circuits (4 credits)

Microwave network analysis; analysis and design of planar transmission lines, impedance matching and tuning; analysis and design of 2-, 3- and 4-port passive networks; analysis and design of active microwave circuits; introduction to microwave systems. The lab portion incorporates software for analysis, design and optimization of passive and active, lumped and distributed circuits. Prerequisite: ENEE 2611 or permission of instructor.

3660 Communications Systems Design (4 credits)

Design and performance evaluation of terrestrial and space communications systems; error correction coding; spread spectrum communication; link budget analysis and environmental effects. System design considerations include engineering judgment decisions to implement optimum communication configurations such as data rates, bandwidth, modulation schemes and operating frequencies. Prerequisite: ENEE 3130.

3670 Introduction to DSP (4 credits)

Introduction to the theory and applications of Digital Signal Processing. Special attention is paid to the fast Fourier transform and convolution and to the design and implementation of both FIR and IIR digital filters. Prerequisite: ENEE 3111.

3810 Topics Electrical Engineering (1 to 5 credits)

Various topics in electrical engineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

Topics in electrical engineering investigated under faculty supervision. May be taken more than once. Students must obtain and complete an Independent Study form from the Office of the Registrar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4035 Nanophotonics (4 credits)

Nanophotonics provides high-speed, high-bandwidth, and ultra-small optoelectronic components. This course covers nanoscale processes, devices and their applications for harnessing and manipulating light on the nanoscale.

4310 Information Theory and Coding (3 credits)

Information and entropy; coding theory; error detection, correction codes; channel capacity; application to communications engineering.

4325 Data & Computer Communication (3 credits)

OSI model; protocols; physical layout; modulation; switching; network topology, routing algorithms; LANs, ISDN.

4360 Digital & Space Communication (3 credits)

Performance of digital systems; coherent signals; coding methods; optimum receivers; synchronization; spreading spectrum systems; space communications.

4416 Advanced Digital Signal Topics (4 credits)

Study of linear discrete-time systems used to perform operation on random processes for the purposes of signal detection, estimation, spectral estimation, enhancement and parametric modeling of signals and systems, linear difference equations, Z-transforms, random sequences, state variables, matched filtering, Wiener filtering. Prerequisite: ENEE 3670.

4425 Image Processing (3 credits)

Methods for coding, storing, filtering images via digital computer; image enhancement; restoration; sampling understanding and pattern recognition.

4450 Speech Processing (3 credits)

Vocal react modeling, linear predictive modeling techniques, speech, compression methods; introduction to speech recognition methods.

4460 Real-Time Digital Signal Proc (4 credits)

Digital signal processing algorithms and processing of discrete data, finite word length effects on filters, fixed point arithmetic and floating-point arithmetic. Overview of different architectures of digital signal processors. Programming of the DSP processor, implementation of DSP algorithms on DSP hardware in labs. Prerequisite: ENEE 3111, ENEE 3670, or ENCE 3210.

4610 Advanced Electromagnetics (4 credits)

Properties of electromagnetic radiation; guided waves; propagation; high-frequency techniques. Specific topics include: integra; equations and the moment method; scattering; and Green's functions.

4620 Adv Optical Fiber Comm (4 credits)

A comprehensive treatment of the theory and behavior of basic constituents, such as optical fibers, light sources, photodetectors, connecting and coupling devices, and optical amplifiers. The basic design principles of digital and analog optical fiber transmission links. The operating principles of wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and the components needed for its realization. Descriptions of the architectures and performance characteristics of complex optical networks for connecting users who have a wide range of transmission needs (SONET/SDH). Discussions of advanced optical communication techniques, such as soliton transmission, optical code-division multiplexing (optical CDMA), and ultra-fast optical time division multiplexing (OTDM). Advanced Project. Graduate course: Prerequisite: instructor permission.

4630 Optical Networking (4 credits)

This course provides a technical overview of optical networking. It gives students a solid understanding of optical networking field principles and practice. Underlying principles are reviewed along with common optical solutions and practices. It explains and provides practical tips on how to design and implement Networks. Examples are used to demonstrate key concepts of ATM, SONET/SDH and DWDM implementation. Prerequisite: ENEE 3011 or instructor approval.

4671 Comp-Aided Dsgn Microwave Ckts (4 credits)

 

4720 Modern and Digital Control Sys (4 credits)

State space analysis and synthesis of continuous and discrete linear systems; Z-transform methods; controllability, observability, minimal realization and pole- assignment design.

4750 Adaptive Control Systems (3 credits)

Adaptive control techniques; learning systems; and stochastic learning system theory are covered.

4800 Advanced Topics (EE) (1 to 5 credits)

Various advanced topics in electrical engineering as announced. May be taken more than once.

4991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 credits)

 

6991 Ph.D Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

6995 Ph.D Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 


Engineering (ENGR)
1240 Technology 21: Energy (0 or 4 credits)

Technology 21 is a three course sequence designed to provide students with an awareness of the technological challenges of the twenty-first century and an understanding of the scientific principles upon which the technology is based. The first quarter begins with a review of numeracy, the language of science and technology. The course explores our dependency on energy, the amount we consume is staggering and most comes from non-renewable fossil fuels. The second and third quarters are concerned with information technology and the relation between technology and global issues.

1241 Technology 21: Climate (0 or 4 credits)

Technology 21 is a three course sequence designed to provide students with an awareness of the technological challenges of the twenty-first century and an understanding of the scientific principles upon which the technology is based. The first quarter begins with a review of numeracy, the language of science and technology. The course explores our dependency on energy, the amount we consume is staggering and most comes from non-renewable fossil fuels. The second and third quarters are concerned with information technology and the relation between technology and global issues.

1242 Technology 21: Information (0 or 4 credits)

Technology 21 is a three course sequence designed to provide students with an awareness of the technological challenges of the twenty-first century and an understanding of the scientific principles upon which the technology is based. The first quarter begins with a review of numeracy, the language of science and technology. The course explores our dependency on energy, the amount we consume is staggering and most comes from non-renewable fossil fuels. The second and third quarters are concerned with information technology and the relation between technology and global issues.

1511 Engineering Connections I (1 credits)

This is the first course in a three course sequence designed to help students bridge the gap from high school to a college environment in a very challenging major. Topics and activities include academic success strategies; interviewing engineering alumni; the ethics of the profession; visits to industry sites; seminars by industry and academic experts; establishing the relationships between math, science, and engineering courses with design projects; critical and creative thinking activities; tours of the research labs of the engineering professors; disseminating information on the dual degree programs, the MBA programs, the honor code, and engineering program structures; and readings from and discussions about articles from professional publications. Membership in a professional society is a required course component.

1521 Engineering Connections II (1 credits)

This is the second course in a three course sequence designed to help students bridge the gap from high school to a college environment in a very challenging major. Topics and activities include academic success strategies; interviewing engineering alumni; the ethics of the profession; visits to industry sites; seminars by industry and academic experts; establishing the relationships between math, science, and engineering courses with design projects; critical and creative thinking activities; tours of the research labs of the engineering professors; disseminating information on the dual degree programs, the MBA programs, the honor code, and engineering program structures; and readings from and discussions about articles from professional publications. Membership in a professional society is a required course component. Recommended prerequisite: ENGR 1611. Corequisite: ENGR 1621 or instructor approval.

1531 Engineering Connections III (1 credits)

This is the third course in a three course sequence designed to help students bridge the gap from high school to a college environment in a very challenging major. Topics and activities include academic success strategies; interviewing engineering alumni; the ethics of the profession; visits to industry sites; seminars by industry and academic experts; establishing the relationships between math, science, and engineering courses with design projects; critical and creative thinking activities; tours of the research labs of the engineering professors; disseminating information on the dual degree programs, the MBA programs, the honor code, and engineering program structures; and readings from and discussions about articles from professional publications. Membership in a professional society is a required course component. Recommended prerequisite: ENGR 1621. Corequisite: ENGR 1631 or instructor approval.

1611 Engr Concepts & Practice I (0 or 4 credits)

Introduction to concepts and practice in computer, electrical and mechanical engineering including engineering ethics. Engineering problem-solving as it applies to engineering analysis, synthesis and design. Students practice structured teamwork and program management skills in the context of projects. Emphasis on computer tools with immediate application to engineering practice.

1621 Engr Concepts & Practice II (0 to 3 credits)

Introduction to elementary concepts and practices in electrical engineering and electronics including electrical current and voltage and basic electrical circuit analysis, assembly and testing. Students are required to complete a simple project including mechanical and electrical components during which they practice teamwork while gaining skills in electrical system troubleshooting. Introduction to Multisim circuit analysis software and engineering ethics are among other topics covered in this course. Prerequisite: ENGR 1611.

1631 Engr Concepts & Practice III (0 or 3 credits)

Concepts III provides first-year engineering students the opportunity to explore fundamental computer engineering concepts. Lectures include the fundamentals of digital electronics. In the laboratory students use logic circuits to build analog to digital converter and program and microprocessor in assembly language to use signals from ultrasound sensors to control an autonomous vehicle. A report including a detailed analysis of the vehicle control system, flow charts, and program documentation is required. Prerequisites: ENGR 1611, ENGR 1621.

1700 Machine Shop Practice (1 credits)

Introduction to concepts and practice in basic machine tool work (i.e. mill, lathe, welding etc.). The course provides the necessary information for majors and non-majors to gain access to the DU Engineering Machine Shop. Class size is limited to 5 students per quarter. Enrollment priority will be given to engineering majors.

1911 Intro to Engineering I (2 credits)

This course is intended for transfer students who have had an introduction to engineering, but who need to learn certain techniques and software typically dealt with in ENGR 1611 including engineering ethics.

1921 Intro in Engineering II (1 credits)

This course is intended mainly for transfer students who have had instructions to engineering, but who need to learn certain techniques and software typically dealt with in ENGR 1621 including engineering ethics.

1931 Intro to Engineering III (1 credits)

This course is intended mainly for transfer students who have had an introduction to engineering, but who need to learn certain techniques and software typically dealt with in ENGR 1631 including engineering ethics.

1992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

2035 Engineering Applications III (0 or 3 credits)

Topics from computer, electrical and mechanical engineering demonstrating the interdependence of the disciplines including engineering ethics. Principles and use of transducers and data acquisition systems. Techniques for signal conditioning and analysis of experimental data. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, ENME 2520, COMP 1572. Corequisites: ENEE 2101, ENME 2710 or permission of instructor.

2610 Engineering Integration I (0 to 3 credits)

Interdisciplinary course combining topics from computer, electrical and mechanical engineering including engineering ethics, with emphasis on laboratory experience and the design, analysis and testing of interdisciplinary systems. Manufacture of mechanical systems and/or circuit boards. Team project work on interdisciplinary "design-and-build" projects. Prerequisites: ENGR 2035 and junior standing in the appropriate engineering discipline. Corequisite: enrollment in appropriate junior-level engineering courses.

2620 Engineering Integration II (0 or 3 credits)

Interdisciplinary course combining topics from computer, electrical and mechanical engineering including engineering ethics, with emphasis on laboratory experience and the design, analysis and testing of interdisciplinary systems. Manufacture of mechanical systems and/or circuit boards. Team project work on interdisciplinary "design-and-build" projects. Prerequisite: ENGR 2610. Corequisite: enrollment in appropriate junior level engineering courses.

2910 Engineering Economics (3 credits)

This course focuses on the practical application of economics to engineering. It explains concepts in accounting and finance and applies them to engineering situations. Topics that are discussed include: economic decision making, engineering cost and estimates, interest, inflation, depreciation, income taxes, minimum attractive rate of return, economic viability of projects, and the economic advantages of "green" technology.

2950 Engineering Assessment I (0 credits)

Examination covering basic mathematics, science and sophomore-level engineering topics. Must be taken prior to obtaining senior status in engineering. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, ENME 2520, COMP 1572. Corequisites: ENGR 2035, ENCE 2101, ENME 2710.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3100 Instrumentation & Data Acqstn (4 credits)

This course examines different instrumentation techniques and describes how different measurement instruments work. Measurement devices include: length, speed, acceleration, force, torque, pressure, sound, flow, temperature, and advanced systems. This course also examines the acquisition, processing, transmission and manipulation of data. Prerequisite: PHYS 1214.

3200 Intro to Nanotechnology (4 credits)

In this highly interdisciplinary series of lectures spanning across Engineering, Physics, Chemistry and Biology, an introduction to the subject of nanotechnology is provided. The most important recent accomplishments so far in the application of nanotechnology in several disciplines are discussed. Then a brief overview of the most important instrumentation systems used by nanotechnologists is provided. The nature of nanoparticles, nanoparticle composites, carbon nanostructures, including carbon nanotubes and their composites is subsequently discussed. The course also deals with nanopolymers, nanobiological systems, and nanoelectronic materials and devices. The issues of modeling of nanomaterials and nanostructures are also covered in this class. Multiscale modeling based on finite element simulations, Monte Carlo methods, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations are briefly addressed. Most importantly, students should obtain appreciation of developments in nanotechnology outside their present area of expertise. Prerequisite: ENME 2410.

3210 Intro Nano-Electro-Mechanics (4 credits)

Familiarize science and engineering students to the electromechanical aspects of the emerging field of Nanotechnology (NEMS). NEMS is a relatively new and highly multidisciplinary field of science and technology with applications in the state of the art and future sensors, actuators, and electronics. Starting with an overview of nanotechnology and discussion on the shifts in the electromechanical behavior and transduction mechanisms when scaling the physical dimensions from centimeters to micro-meters and then down to nanometers. Several electromechanical transduction mechanisms at the micro and nanoscale are presented and discussed in an application based context. New electromechanical interactions appearing in the nano and molecular scale, such as intra-molecular forces and molecular motors, are discussed. A detailed discussion and overview of nanofabrication technologies and approaches are also provided. Prerequisite: must be an Engineering or Science major of at least junior standing.

3215 NEMS and Nanofabrication Lab (4 credits)

This course provides science and engineering students with comprehensive hands-on experience in design, fabrication and characterization of Nanoscale Electromechanical Systems (NEMS). This laboratory-based course starts with a number of sessions including brief lectures reviewing the fundamentals and theories followed by pre-designed lab experiments. The students are then provided with a choice of different comprehensive design and implementation examples. The examples include design, layout, fabrication, and characterization of the devices. Prerequisite: ENGR 3210.

3220 Intro. MEMS and Microsystems (4 credits)

This course introduces students to the multi-disciplinary field of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technology. MEMS and Microsystem technology is the integration of micro-scale electro-mechanical elements, sensors, actuators, and electronics on a common substrate or platform through semiconductor microfabrication technologies. The course gives a brief overview of the involved physical phenomena, electromechanical transduction mechanisms, design principles, as well as fabrication and manufacturing technologies.

3313 Engineering Design Project I (2 credits)

Planning, development and execution of an engineering design project. The project may be interdisciplinary, involving aspects of computer, electrical and mechanical engineering. Projects have economic, ethical, social and other constraints, as appropriate. Design activities include: 1) preparation and presentation of proposals in response to requests-for-proposals from "customers," including problem description, quantitative and qualitative criteria for success, alternate designs and project plans; 2) generation and analysis of alternate designs, and choice of best design; 3) formulation of test procedures to demonstrate that the design chosen meets the criteria for success, and testing of the completed project where feasible; 4) reporting on the design and testing. Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering.

3314 Honors Thesis I (2 credits)

Honors equivalent of ENGR 3313. Required of students in the Honors Program and of students graduating summa cum laude, in place of ENGR 3313. In addition to the requirements given for ENGR 3313, the student must submit a copy of the final report on the project to an engineering department.

3323 Engineering Design Project II (3 credits)

Planning, development and execution of an engineering design project. The project may be interdisciplinary, involving aspects of computer, electrical and mechanical engineering. Projects have economic, ethical, social and other constraints, as appropriate. Design activities include: 1) preparation and presentation of proposals in response to requests-for-proposals from "customers," including problem description, quantitative and qualitative criteria for success, alternate designs and project plans; 2) generation and analysis of alternate designs, and choice of best design; 3) formulation of test procedures to demonstrate that the design chosen meets the criteria for success, and testing of the completed project where feasible; 4) reporting on the design and testing. Prerequisite: ENGR 3313.

3324 Honors Thesis II (3 credits)

Honors equivalent of ENGR 3323. Required of students in the Honors Program and of students graduating summa cum laude in place of ENGR 3323. In addition to requirements given for ENGR 3323, the student must submit a copy of the final report on the project to and engineering department.

3333 Engineering Design Project III (3 credits)

Planning, development and execution of an engineering design project. The project may be interdisciplinary, involving aspects of computer, electrical and mechanical engineering. Projects have economic, ethical, social and other constraints, as appropriate. Design activities include: 1) preparation and presentation of proposals in response to requests-for-proposals from "customers," including problem description, quantitative and qualitative criteria for success, alternate designs and project plans; 2) generation and analysis of alternate designs, and choice of best design; 3) formulation of test procedures to demonstrate that the design chosen meets the criteria for success, and testing of the completed project where feasible; 4) reporting on the design and testing. Prerequisite: ENGR 3323.

3334 Honors Thesis III (3 credits)

Honors equivalent of ENGR 3333. Required of students in the Honors Program and of students graduating summa cum laude, in place of ENGR 3333. In addition to the requirements given for ENGR 3333, the student must submit a copy of the final report on the project to an engineering department.

3350 Reliability (4 credits)

An overview of reliability-based design. Topics include: fundamentals of statistics, probability distributions, determining distribution parameters, design for six sigma, Monte Carlo simulation, first and second order reliability methods (FORM, SORM), Most Probable Point (MPP) reliability methods, sensitivity factors, probabilistic design.

3510 Renewable & Effic. Power Sys. (4 credits)

This course introduces the current and future sustainable electrical power systems. Fundamentals of renewable energy sources and storage systems are discussed. Interfaces of the new sources to the utility grid are covered. Prerequisite: ENEE 2021.

3520 Intro to Power Electronics (4 credits)

This covers fundamentals of power electronics. We discuss various switching converters topologies. Basic knowledge of Efficiency and small-signal modeling for the DC-DC switching converters are covered. Furthermore, magnetic and filter design are introduced. Prerequisites: ENEE 2211 and ENGR 3722.

3525 Pwr Elctncs & Rnwbl Enrgy Lab (1 credits)

In this course the fundamentals of switching converters and power electronics in a real laboratory set-up is covered. The course incorporates hardware design, analysis, and simulation of various switching converters as a power processing element for different energy sources. The energy sources are power utility, batteries, and solar panels. Prerequisite: ENGR 3520.

3530 Intro to Power and Energy (3 credits)

Basic concepts of AC systems, single-phase and three-phase networks, electric power generation, transformers, transmission lines, and electric machinery. Prerequisite: ENEE 2021.

3535 Electric Power Engineering Lab (1 credits)

In this laboratory, the magnetic circuits, single phase transformers, power quality and harmonics synchronous machines, Induction machines and DC machines are studied and tested in a real physical setup. Prerequisite: ENGR 3530.

3540 Electric Power Systems (4 credits)

This course covers methods of calculation of a comprehensive idea on the various aspects of power system problems and algorithms for solving these problems. Prerequisite: ENGR 3530.

3545 Electric Power Economy (3 credits)

This course covers economy aspects of electric power industry and the implications for power and energy engineering in the market environment. Prerequisite: ENGR 3530.

3550 Intro to Machine Drive Control (4 credits)

This course provides the basic theory for the analysis and application of adjustable-speed drive systems employing power electronic converters and ac or dc machines. Prerequisites: ENGR 3520 and ENGR 3530.

3610 Engineering Analysis (3 credits)

Applied mathematics for engineers. Generalized Fourier analysis, complex variables, vector calculus, introduction to Bessel functions, and applied probability and statistics. Prerequisites: MATH 2070, MATH 2080.

3620 Advanced Engineering Math (4 credits)

Applied mathematics for engineers. Systems and series solutions of ordinary differential equations, Fourier analysis, partial differential equations, linear algebra, vector calculus, special functions, unconstrained and combinatorial optimization, and applied probability and statistics. Prerequisites: MATH 2070 and MATH 2080.

3630 Finite Element Methods (4 credits)

Introduction to the use of finite element methods in one or two dimensions with applications to solid and fluid mechanics, heat transfer and electromagnetic fields; projects in one or more of the above areas. Prerequisite: ENGR 3610 or equivalent.

3721 Controls (3 or 4 credits)

Modeling, analysis and design of linear feedback control systems using Laplace transform methods. Techniques and methods used in linear mathematical models of mechanical, electrical, thermal and fluid systems are covered. Feedback control system models, design methods and performance criteria in both time and frequency domains. A linear feedback control system design project is required. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

3725 Digital Control (4 credits)

The course introduces and studies computer-controlled systems following the state variable approach and the z-transform approach. Sampling theory is presented, along with its effect on digital control design. Feedback computer controlled systems, components of digital control systems, system models on the z-domain (z-transfer functions) and on the time domain (state variable representations) are examined. Digital controller design from the state space and frequency domain points of view are included. System design and evaluation of system performance are considered. Several discrete-time controllers are presented, state and output feedback controllers, reconstruction of states using observers. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111 and ENGR 3610 or instructor permission. Students must have knowledge of MATLAB. Recommended prerequisite: ENGR 3721.

3730 Robotics (3 credits)

Introduction to the analysis, design, modeling and application of robotic manipulators. Review of the mathematical preliminaries required to support robot theory. Topics include forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, motion kinematics, trajectory control and planning, and kinetics. Prerequisites: ENME 2520 and MATH 2060 or MATH 2200 or permission of instructor.

3731 Robotics Lab (1 credits)

Laboratory that complements the analysis, design, modeling and application of robotic manipulators. Implementation of the mathematical structures required to support robot operation. Topics include forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, motion kinematics, trajectory control and planning and kinetics. Applications include programming and task planning of a manufacturing robot manipulator. Corerequisite: ENGR 3730 or permission of instructor.

3800 Special Topics (ENGR) (1 to 5 credits)

Special topics in engineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

3900 Engineering Internship (1 to 4 credits)

Students in engineering may receive elective credit for engineering work performed for engineering employers with the approval of the chair or associate chair of the department. At the end of the term, a student report on the work is required, and a recommendation will be required from the employer before a grade is assigned. Junior, senior, or graduate status in engineering is normally required. May not be used to satisfy technical requirements. May be taken more than one for a maximum of 6 qtr. hrs. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

3951 Engineering Assessment II (0 credits)

Students in Mechanical Engineering must register for and take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination (FE). All students must complete an engineering exit interview and other assessment related tasks. To be taken in the last quarter of attendance.

3970 Engineering Entrepreneurship (4 credits)

The course presents an overview of fundamentals of understanding entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial characteristics; the focus is on aspects of engineering entrepreneurship, technology-based innovation and new product development. Topics to be covered: learning an industry; recognizing and creating opportunities; new product development process, phases and cycle, risks and benefits; 'testing' of an engineering-focused business concept; marketing, organizational plan strategies and financing for new start ups. Special attention is given to technological innovation, considering both incremental or routine innovation, and more radical or revolutionary changes in products and processes. Prerequisite: ENGR 3610 or permission of the instructor.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

Topics in engineering investigated under faculty supervision. May be taken more than once. Students must obtain and complete an Independent Study form from the Office of the Registrar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4100 Instrumentation & Data Acqstn (4 credits)

 

4200 Intro to Nanotechnology (4 credits)

The most important recent accomplishments so far in the application of nanotechnology in several disciplines are discussed. Then a brief overview of the most important instrumentation systems used by nanotechnologists is provided. The nature of nanoparticles, nanoparticle composites, carbon nanostructures, including carbon nanotubes and their composites is subsequently discussed. The course also deals with nanopolymers, nanobiological systems, and nanoelectronic materials and devices. The issues of modeling of nanomaterials and nanostructures is also covered. Multiscale modeling based on finite element simulations, Monte Carlo methods, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations are briefly addressed. Most importantly, students should obtain appreciation of developments in nanotechnology outside their present area of expertise.

4210 Intro Nano-Electro-Mechanics (4 credits)

This course familiarizes science and engineering students to the electromechanical aspects of the emerging field of Nanotechnology (NEMS). NEMS is a relatively new and highly multidisciplinary field of science and technology with applications in the state of the art and future sensors, actuators, and electronics. This course starts with an overview of nanotechnology and discussion on the shifts in the electromechanical behavior and transduction mechanisms when scaling the physical dimensions from centimeters to micro-meters and then down to nanometers. Several electromechanical transduction mechanisms at the micro and nanoscale are presented and discussed in an application based context. New electromechanical interactions appearing in the nano and molecular scale, such as intra-molecular forces and molecular motors, are discussed. A detailed discussion and overview of nanofabrication technologies and approaches are also provided.

4215 NEMS and Nanofabrication Lab (4 credits)

This course provides science and engineering students with comprehensive hands-on experience in design, fabrication and characterization of Nanoscale Electromechanical Systems (NEMS). This laboratory-based course starts with a number of sessions including brief lectures reviewing the fundamentals and theories followed by pre-designed lab experiments. The students are then provided with a choice of different comprehensive design and implementation projects to be performed during the quarter. The projects include design, layout, fabrication, and characterization of the devices potentially resulting in novel findings and publications.

4220 Intro MEMS and Microsystems (4 credits)

This course introduces students to the multi-disciplinary field of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technology. MEMS and Microsystem technology is the integration of micro-scale electro-mechanical elements, sensors, actuators, and electronics on a common substrate or platform through semiconductor microfabrication technologies. The course gives a brief overview of the involved physical phenomena, electromechanical transduction mechanisms, design principles, as well as fabrication and manufacturing technologies.

4350 Reliability (4 credits)

An overview of reliability-based design. Topics include: fundamentals of statistics, probability distributions, determining distribution parameters, design for six sigma, Monte Carlo simulation, first and second order reliability methods (FORM, SORM). Most Probable Point (MPP) reliability methods, sensitivity factors, probabilistic design.

4545 Electric Power Economy (4 credits)

This course covers economy aspects of electric power industry and the implications for power and energy engineering in the market environment. Prerequisite: ENGR 3530 or ENGR 4530.

4560 Power Gen Operation and Contrl (4 credits)

This course covers economic dispatch of thermal units and methods of solution; transmission system effects; generate with limited energy supply; production cost models; control of generation; interchange of power and energy; power system security; state estimation in power systems; optimal power flow. Prerequisite: ENGR 4540.

4590 Power System Protection (4 credits)

This course covers methods of calculation of fault currents under different types of fault; circuit breakers, current transformers, potential transformers; basic principles of various types of relays; applications of relays in the protection of generator, transformer, line, and bus, etc. Prerequisite: ENGR 4540.

4620 Optimization (3 or 4 credits)

Engineering problems will be formulated as different programming problems to show the wide applicability and generality of optimization methods. The development, application, and computational aspects of various optimization techniques will be discussed with engineering examples. The application of nonlinear programming techniques will be emphasized. A design project will be assigned.

4730 Introduction to Robotics (4 credits)

Introduction to the analysis, design, modeling and application of robotic manipulators. Review of the mathematical preliminaries required to support robot theory. Topics include forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, motion kinematics, trajectory control and planning, and kinetics. Applications include programming and task planning of a manufacturing robot manipulator. Prerequisites: ENME 2520 and MATH 2060 or MATH 2200 or instructor approval.

4740 Adaptive & Optimal Control (4 credits)

This course covers fundamentals of adaptive and optimal control systems. Topics to be covered include: i) From adaptive control: parameter estimation, model reference adaptive systems, self-tuning regulators, gain scheduling, stability, alternatives to adaptive control; ii) From optimal control: principles and methods of optimal control, performance measures, dynamic programming, calculus of variations, Pontryagin's principle, variational approach to optimal control problems, optimal linear regulators with quadriatic criteria, time and fuel optimal systems. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111, ENGR 3610, and ENGR 3721. Students must have knowledge of MATLAB.

4745 Adv Non-Linear Control System (3 credits)

Limit cycles; functional analysis approach to input-output stability; analysis/synthesis of time-varying systems; feedback linearization, bang-bang control. Prerequisite(s): ENGR 3721

4810 Advanced Topics (ENGR) (1 to 5 credits)

 

4900 Engineering Seminar (1 credits)

Current topics in engineering.

4930 Advanced Project (4 credits)

 

4991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 credits)

 

5995 Independent Research (1 to 18 credits)

 


Mechanical Engineering (ENME)
2410 Materials Science I (3 credits)

Atomic structure, bonding and crystal structures in solids. Diffusion and crystal defects. Thermodynamics and phase equilibria in one-, two- and three-component systems, binary phase diagrams. Kinetics and phase transformations. Specific microstructure and mechanical properties of metals, glasses, ceramics, polymers and composites. Electrical conduction: energy levels and bands, charge carriers and insulators. Semiconductors of intrinsic and extrinsic types. Prerequisites: PHYS 1212, CHEM 1010/1610, MATH 1953 or permission of instructor.

2421 Materials Science II (3 credits)

Atomic structure, bonding and crystal structures in solids. Diffusion and crystal defects. Thermodynamics and phase equalibria in one-, two- and three-component systems, binary phase diagrams. Kinetics and phase transformations. Specific microstructure and mechanical properties of metals, glasses, ceramics, polymers and composites. Electrical conduction: energy levels and bands, charge carriers and insulators. Semiconductors of intrinsic and extrinsic types. Laboratory projects/demonstrations. Prerequisite: ENME 2410.

2510 Engineering Mechanics I (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2510) Statics of particles, and rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, frames and machines, friction, centroids and centers of mass, moments of inertia, virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods for particles and systems of particles, angular momentum, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. A relevant topic in engineering ethics is also explored. Prerequisite: PHYS 1211. Corequisite: MATH 1953.

2520 Engineering Mechanics II (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2520) Statics of particles and rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, frames and machines, friction, centroids and centers of mass, moments of inertia, virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. A relevant topic in engineering ethics is also explored. Prerequisite: ENME 2510. Corequisite: MATH 2070.

2530 Engineering Mechanics III (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2530) Statics of particles and rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, frames and machines, friction, centroids and centers of mass, moments of inertia, virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods for particles and systems of particles, angular momentum, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. Prerequisite: ENME 2520, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

2541 Mechanics of Materials (3 credits)

Normal and shear stress and strain; elasticity, mechanical properties of materials, principal stresses; torsion, beams, deflection of beams under loads, methods of superposition, failure theory, columns. Prerequisite: ENME 2520.

2651 Fluid Mech/Heat Transfer I (3 credits)

Course series provides students with the basic skill levels required to solve fluid-mechanics and heat transfer problems. Topics include hydrostatics, dimensional analysis, incompressible and compressible flows, conduction, convection and radiation. Students explore a variety of solution techniques such as control volume, differential analysis, boundary layer analysis, finite differencing and resistance network analogies. Prerequisite: ENME 2520.

2661 Fluid Mech/Heat Transfer II (3 credits)

Course series provides students with the basic skills levels required to solve fluid-mechanics and heat transfer problems. Topics include hydrostatics, dimensional analysis, incompressible and compressible flows, conduction, convection and radiation. Students explore a variety of solution techniques such as control volume, differential analysis, boundary layer analysis, finite differencing and resistance network analogies. Prerequisite: ENME 2651.

2671 Fluid Mech/Heat Transfer III (3 credits)

Course series provides students with the basic skill levels required to solve fluid-mechanics and heat transfer problems. Topics include hydrostatics, dimensional analysis, incompressible and compressible flows, conduction, convection and radiation. Students explore a variety of solution techniques such as control volume, differential analysis, boundary layer analysis, finite differencing and resistance network analogies. Prerequisite: ENME 2661.

2710 Engineering Thermodynamics I (3 credits)

Properties of a pure substance. Use of tables of properties. First and second laws of thermodynamics for closed and open systems. Work, heat, power and entropy. Engine, power plant and refrigeration cycles. Gas mixtures, thermodynamic relations and chemical reactions. Prerequisite: PHYS 1212.

2720 Engineering Thermodynamics II (3 credits)

Properties of a pure substance. Use of tables of properties. First and second laws of thermodynamics for closed and open systems. Work, heat, power and entropy. Engine, power plant and refrigeration cycles. Gas mixtures, thermodynamic relations and chemical reactions. Prerequisite: ENME 2710.

2810 Mech Engineering Lab I (3 credits)

Engineering experiments illustrating selected topics in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, thermodynamics, measurement and control. Use of microcomputers in experimentation and control. This course encourages the development of laboratory experimentation skills, design skills and technical writing skills. Prerequisites: ENME 2651, ENME 2720, ENME 2541 or permission of instructor.

2820 Mech Engineering Lab II (3 credits)

Engineering experiments illustrating selected topics in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, thermodynamics, measurement and control. Use of microcomputers in experimentation and control. This course encourages the development of laboratory experimentation skills, design skills and technical writing skills. Prerequisite: ENME 2810 or permission of instructor.

2992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3230 Intro to Nondestructive Eval (3 credits)

Principles of nondestructive evaluation, including ultrasonic, radiographic, magnetic, electrical, penetrant, acoustic emission, etc. Covers expected results for flaw and materials characterization. Current literature approaches are examined. Prerequisite: ENGR 3610.

3310 Comp Methods for Mech & Matrls (4 credits)

An introductory course for the general-purpose computational methods in advanced multiscale materials and mechanics. Students learn the fundamentals on the numerical methods used in mechanical and materials engineering.

3400 Fatigue (4 credits)

A detailed overview of fatigue. Topics include: stress life and strain life approaches, fracture mechanics, constant amplitude and spectrum loading, life prediction, fatigue at notches, microstructural effects, environmentally assisted fatigue, retardation and acceleration, multi-axial fatigue, design against fatigue, and reliability.

3511 Machine Design (3 credits)

Application of statics, dynamics, mechanics of materials and manufacturing processes to the design of machine elements and systems. Properties of materials and design criteria. Synthesis and analysis of a machine design project. Prerequisites: ENME 2520, ENME 2541.

3540 Intro to Continuum Mechanics (3 credits)

Kinematics of deformation, measures of stress, equations of motion for deformable solids; constitutive relations for elastic, visoelastic and elastic-plastic materials; work and energy. Prerequisites: ENME 2530 and ENME 2541.

3545 Mechanisms (4 credits)

Synthesis, analysis and use of mechanisms. Mechanisms studied include cams, gears and planar linkages, with an emphasis on planar linkages. Prerequisites: ENME 2530 and COMP 1572.

3550 Mechanical Vibrations (3 credits)

Basic mechanical vibrations including: dynamics, periodic motion, energy methods and Rayleigh's principle, forced periodic motion, initial conditions and transient vibration, damping, damped forced vibrations, several degrees of freedom, torsional vibration, discrete and distributed systems. Prerequisites: ENME 2530, ENGR 3610.

3555 Advanced Dynamics (3 credits)

Introduction to variational principles of mechanics. Lagrangian mechanics, three-dimensional rigid body mechanics, other topics. Applications. Prerequisites: ENME 2530, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

3560 Adv Mechanisms & Machinery (3 credits)

Advanced topics in the design and analysis of mechanisms. Topics may include: force analysis of mechanisms, force and moment balancing, flywheels, flexible mechanisms. Prerequisite: ENME 3545 or instructor's permission.

3651 Computational Fluid Dynamics (4 credits)

This course introduces principles and applications of computational methods in fluid flow and topics chosen from heat transfer, mass transfer or two phase flow. The conservation equations their discretations and solutions are presented. Convergence and validity of solutions along with computational efficiency are explored. Students learn to apply these techniques using the latest software packages. Prerequisite: ENME 2671 or instructor approval.

3731 Adv Engr Thermodynamics (3 credits)

Advanced topics in thermodynamics. Introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisites: ENME 2720, ENGR 3610 or instructor's permission.

3820 Topics Mechanical Engineering (1 to 5 credits)

Mechanical engineering topics as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: vary with offering.

3860 Intro to Air Pollution (3 credits)

The thermodynamics, kinetics and photochemistry of air pollution. Origins and effects of particulate pollution, including light scattering. Effects of meteorology on air pollution. Prerequisite: MATH 1953.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

Topics in mechanical engineering investigated under faculty supervision. May be taken more than once. Students must obtain and complete an Independent Study form from the Office of the Registrar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

3995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 

4020 Adv Finite Element Analysis (4 credits)

 

4310 Comp Methods for Mech & Matls (4 credits)

An introductory course for the general-purpose computational methods in advanced multiscale materials and mechanics. Students learn the fundamentals on the numerical methods used in mechanical and materials engineering.

4360 Advanced Elasticity (3 credits)

Stress tensor; analysis of strain; conservation laws; linear elastic stress-strain relationships; solution of problems in elasticity by potentials; 2-D problems in elasticity; energy theorems; wave propagation; numerical techniques.

4370 Plasticity (4 credits)

Flow theory of plasticity; yield surface; plastic potentail; loading - unloading condition; hardening rules; deformation theory of plasticity; elastic-plastic problems; slip line theory; statically indeterminate problems numerical methods in plasticity.

4400 Fatigue (4 credits)

A detailed overview of fatigue. Topics include: stress life and strain life approaches, fracture mechanics, constant amplitude and spectrum loading, life prediction, fatigue at notches, microstructural effects, environmentally assisted fatigue, retardation and acceleration, multi-axial fatigue, design against fatigue and reliability.

4650 Adv. Fluid Dynamics (4 credits)

Physical properties of liquids and gases; turbulence and closure models; surface waves and instabilities; non-Newtonian fluid behavior; conformal mapping and airfoil theory.

4660 Micro Heat Exchangers (4 credits)

Explores the advance principles and applications of fluid dynamics and heat transfer through the application to micro fluidic heat exchanger design and optimization. Students utilize Mathcad extensively to seek optimized exchanger performance within a clearly defined design space. Students also build small scale heat exchangers from their optimized designs. Prerequisite: ENME 2671.

4670 Adv Comptionl Fluid Dynams (4 credits)

Building on the principles and applications of computational methods in fluid flow and topics chosen from heat transfer, mass transfer and two phase flow. Specifically, Monte Carlo and volume of fluid techniques are discussed at length. Additionally, students learn how to set up automated design optimization using the latest software packages. Time permitting, students also are introduced to fluid-solid interaction modeling. Prerequisite: ENME 3651.

4800 Advanced Topics (ME) (1 to 5 credits)

Determined by interest and demand. May be taken more then once for credit.

4991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 credits)

 

5991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

5995 Independent Research (1 to 10 credits)

 


Mechatronic Systems Engineering (ENMT)
3210 Mechatronics I (4 credits)

This course provides basic concepts from electrical, mechanical, and computer engineering as applied to mechatronic systems; and is intended to serve as a foundation course for further exploration in the area of mechatronics. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in engineering.

3220 Mechatronics II (4 credits)

Real-time systems require timely response by a computer to external stimuli. This course examines the issues associated with deterministic performance including basic computer architecture, scheduling algorithms, and software design techniques including data flow diagrams, real-time data flow diagrams, stat transition diagrams, and petri nets. In the lab portion of this class, students program a microcontroller to interact with mechatronic devices. Prerequisites: ENMT 3210, ENCE 3210 or COMP 3354.

3800 Topics (Mechatronics) (1 to 5 credits)

Various topics in Mechatronics System Engineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

4000 Space Systems Design I (4 credits)

The application of advanced theory and concepts as they relate to the development of spacecraft and missile subsystems, and how those subsystems are related under the umbrella of systems engineering. The course emphasizes practical aspects of space systems design and integration, and is team-taught by faculty and functional experts in the various fields. Lecture topics include aerospace materials, mechanics, thermal control, embedded systems, distributed sensor networks and aerospace probability and statistics.

4010 Space Systems Design II (4 credits)

The continuation of Space Systems Design I. Lecture topics include payload communications, guidance and control, spacecraft electric power, propulsion systems, radiation and avionics and sensor subsystems. Prerequisite: Space Systems Design I.

4100 Systems Engineering (4 credits)

Provides a framework for understanding and acquiring the knowledge, tools and skills needed by explicitly "systems-trained" engineers, to effectively interact with specialist engineers and project managers in the engineering of complex, large scale systems. Emphasis is on the development of a life-cycle model for systems engineering processes, to reduce the risk inherent in each life-cycle stage.

4220 Mechatronics II (4 credits)

This course combines systems design and integration with a real world project involving the design and fabrication of an integrated system. Prerequisite: Mechatronics I or equivalent.

4730 Advanced Ground Robotics (4 credits)

Introduction to path planning and sensin and estimation for robotic manipulations and mobile robots. Review of the mathematical preliminaries required to support robot theory. Topics include advanced sensors, mobile robot mechanisms, advanced manipulator mechanisms, path planning in 2-D and 3-D, and simultaneous localization and mapping. Applications include task and motion planning for idealized and real robots. Prerequisite: ENGR 3730.

4734 Unmanned Aerial Systems (4 credits)

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) as is the preferred term by the US DOD, have seen unprecedented levels of growths in military and civilian application domains. Fixed-wing aircraft, heavier or lighter than air, rotary-wing (rotocraft, helicopters), vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) unmanned vehicles are being increasingly used in military and civilian domains for surveillance, reconnaissance, mapping, cartography, border patrol, inspection, homeland security, search and rescue, fire detection, agricultural imaging, traffic monitoring, to name just a few application domains. This course offers a very comprehensive study of UAS that includes: history of unmanned aviation, including evolution of designs and models for application-specific domains; modeling, control and navigation fundamentals for both teleoperation, semi-autonomous and fully autonomous flights; see-and-avoid-systems for different classes of UAS; integration of UAS into the National Airspace System (NAS); applications and case studies. Prerequisite: ENGR 3730.

4800 Adv Topics (Mechatronics) (1 to 5 credits)

Various topics in Mechatronics System Engineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

4991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 credits)

 


Material Science (MTSC)
3010 Mech Behavior of Materials (4 credits)

Effects of microstructure on mechanical behavior of materials (metals, polymers, ceramics and composites); emphasis on recent developments in materials science, modulus, fracture (fracture toughness and brittle strength), fatigue, creep, wear, friction, stress rupture and deformation. Prerequisite: ENME 2421.

3020 Composite Materials I (4 credits)

An introduction to composite materials. Properties of fibers and matrices, fiber architecture, elastic properties of laminae and laminates, interface in composites. Prerequisites: MATH 2030, ENME 2410, and ENME 2541.

3110 Thermodynamics of Solids (3 credits)

Relations among thermodynamic quantities, thermodynamics of phase transformations, chemical reactions, solutions, alloys and phase diagrams. Applications to solid-state properties of materials. Prerequisites: ENME 2710, ENME 2421.

3430 Diffraction & Structure I (3 credits)

Properties of X-rays, geometry of crystals, calculation of directions and intensities of diffracted beams from polycrystalline samples, experimental methods including computerized data acquisition and data reduction, detector characteristics, search/match methods for phase identification, determination of crystal structure (indexing). Laboratory exercises illustrating the above. Prerequisite: ENME 2410.

3450 Fracture Mechanics (4 credits)

Topics include: stress field at a crack tip, linear fracture mechanics, energy release rate, stress intensity factors, plastic zones, plane stress, plane strain, fracture toughness, airy stress functions, elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, J integral, crack tip opening displacements, experimental testing, fatigue, life prediction, crack closure, weight functions, failure analysis. Prerequisites: ENME 2421 and ENEM 2541.

3800 Topics in Materials Science (1 to 5 credits)

Various topics in Materials Science as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with each topic.

3992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4010 Mech Behavior of Materials (4 credits)

Effects of microstructure on mechanical behavior of material; emphasis on recent developments in materials science, fracture, fatigue, creep, wear, corrosion, stress rupture, deformation and residual stress.

4020 Composite Materials I (4 credits)

An introduction to composite materials. Properties of fibers and matrices, fiber architecture, elastic properties of laminae and laminates, interface in composites.

4130 Intro to Surface Science (3 credits)

Overview of the fundamentals of surface science and process with an emphasis on the solid/gas interface. Topical areas include topography, shape, depth, composition, purity, structure and methods used to elucidate same. The experimental aspects will be emphasized blending backgrounds in chemistry, physics, materails and mathematics. theoretical and experimental aspects of interfacial interactions will be considered with particular attention on chemical absorption and desorption. Surface processes include surface diffusion and chemisorption as a precurs or to oxidation and catalysis. Prerequisite(s): Chem 1010, ENME 2410 or equivalent.

4150 Diffraction & Structure I (3 credits)

Properties of X-rays, geometry of crystals, calculation of directions and intensities of diffracted beams from polycrysatlline samples, experimental methods including computerized data acquisition and data reduction, detector characteristics, search/match methods for phase identification, detremination of crystal structure (indexing)/ Laboratory exercises to illustrate the above. Prerequisite(s): ENME 2421

4215 Composite Materials II (3 credits)

A continuation of MTSC 4210: Strength and toughness of composites, thermal behavior, fabrication methods, examples of applications. Prerequisite(s): MTSC 4210

4230 Polymer Science I (3 credits)

Survey of common synthetic organic polymers; their bonding, classification, chemical arrangements of repeat units; tacticity, copolymers, molecular weight averages and distributions; structure of amorphous polymers; chain conformation in single crystals and sperulites; transitions in polymers; glass/rubber, melting, crystallization; structure characterization techniques. Prerequisite(s): ENME 2421

4250 Struct & Props of Ceramics I (3 credits)

Review of structural classes of cermics, structural imperfections, diffusions; phase diagrams in cermanic systems; selected phase transformations, reactions with and between ceramics, sintering and grain growth. Prerequisite(s): ENME 2421

4310 Dsgn w/ Materials w/ Var Pro (3 credits)

Development of the interrelationships of the following factors in design with real materials: variablity in mechanical material properties, statistical design conditions, nondestructive evaluation, proof testing, product liability/lawsuits, desirable reliability/economics.

4450 Fracture Mechanics (4 credits)

Topics include stress field at a crack tip, linear elastic fracture mechanics, energy release rate, stress intensity factors, plastic zones, plane stress, plane strain, fracture toughness, Airy stress functions, elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, J integral, crack tip opening displacements, experimental testing, fatigue, life prediction, crack closure, weight functions, failure analysis.

4800 Advanced Topics (MTSC) (1 to 5 credits)

Selected topics (depending on student and faculty interest): fracture mechanics, fatigue, nonlinear constitutive models, dynamic behavior of materials, corrosion resistant design, thermodynamics of solids II.

4900 Materials Science Seminar (1 credits)

Weekly presentations by graduate students, faculty, outside speakers, etc., on research in progress or other topics of interest.

4991 Independent Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 credits)

 

4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 credits)

 

5995 Independent Research (1 to 18 credits)