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Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering & Computer Science Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Electrical & Computer Engineering

Course Descriptions

This site is provided for ease of access to course descriptions of the various courses required in the ECE programs, however, this may not include all of the courses offered. A full catalog of course descriptions can be found at myWeb.

Computer Engineering (ENCE)
2101 Digital Design (0 to 3 credits)

Basic logic concepts. Boolean algebra, truth tables and logic diagrams. Karnaugh maps; programmable devices including ROM's, PLA's and PAL's; data selectors and multiplexors; flip-flops, and memory design of sequential logic circuits. State diagrams, counters, latches and registers; realization of sequential and arbitrary counters; monostable multivibrators. Course includes engineering ethics. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENEE 2021 or permission of instructor.

3100 Advanced Digital System Design (0 or 4 credits)

Design of logic machines. Finite state machines, gate array designs, ALU and control unit designs, microprogrammed systems. Hardware design of digital circuits using SSI and MSI chips. Introduction to probability and statistics. Application of probability and stochastic processes for cache and paging performance. Laboratories incorporate specification, top-down design, modeling, implementation and testing of actual digital design systems hardware. Simulation of circuits using VHDL before actual hardware implementation. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101.

3210 Microprocessor Systems I (4 credits)

Introduction to microprocessors and to the design and operation of computer systems. A study of the microprocessor and its basic support components. Analysis of CPU architectures of modern computers. Assembly language programming. Use of an assembler and other development tools for programming and developing microprocessor-based systems. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101.

3220 Microprocessor Systems II (4 credits)

Introduction to microprocessors and to the design and operation of computer systems. A study of the microprocessor and its basic support components. Analysis CPU architectures of modern computers. Assembly language programming. Use of an assembler and other development tools for programming and developing microprocessor-based systems. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENCE 3210.

3225 Digital and Microprocessor Sys (4 credits)

Introduction to Hardware Design Language (HDL). Language syntax and synthesis. Applications related to digital system implementation are developed. Project. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101 or instructor's permission.

3231 Embedded Systems Programming (4 credits)

Design, construction and testing of microprocessor systems. Hardware limitations of the single-chip system. Includes micro-controllers, programming for small systems, interfacing, communications, validating hardware and software, microprogramming of controller chips, design methods and testing of embedded systems. Prerequisite: ENCE 3220.

3241 Computer Organization (3 credits)

Organization of digital computers. Memory, register transfer and datapath. Arithmetic Logic Unit. Computer architecture. Control unit. I/O systems. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101.

3250 HDL Modeling & Synthesis (3 credits)

Introduction to Hardware Design Language (HDL). Language syntax and synthesis. Applications related to digital system implementation are developed. Project. Prerequisite: ENCE 2101 or instructor's permission.

3261 Fault Tolerant Computing (3 credits)

Basic concepts of dependable computing. Reliability of nonredundant and redundant systems. Dealing with circuit-level defects. Logic-level fault testing and tolerance. Error detection and correction. Diagnosis and reconfiguration for system-level malfunctions. Degradation management. Failure modeling and risk assessment.

3321 Network Design (4 credits)

Introduction to network components. Layering of network architecture. Analysis of Local Area Network (LAN) concepts and architecture based on IEEE standards. Design principles including switching and multiplexing techniques, physical link, signal propagation, synchronization, framing and error control. Application of probability and statistics in error detecting and control. Ethernet, Token-ring, FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface), ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode), ISDN (Integrated Service Data Networks). Prerequisite: ENEE 3111, ENCE 2101 or permission of instructor.

3501 VLSI Design (3 credits)

Design of Very Large Scale Integration systems. Examination of layout and simulation of digital VLSI circuits using a comprehensive set of CAD tools in a laboratory setting. Studies of layouts of CMOS combinational and sequential circuits using automatic layout generators. Fundamental structures of the layout of registers, adders, decoders, ROM, PLA's, counters, RAM and ALU. Application of statistics and probability to chip performance. CAD tools allow logic verification and timing simulation of the circuits designed. Prerequisite: ENCE 3220.

3610 Multimedia Systems (3 credits)

Interactive multimedia technologies include hardware, software, standards, concepts and issues, compression, decompression, user interface design, query by content, multimedia indexing, and distributed multimedia.

3620 Computer Vision (4 credits)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts in image processing and computer vision. First, an introduction to low-level image analysis methods, including radiometry and geometric image formation, edge detection, feature detection, and image segmentation are presented. Then, geometric based image transformations (e.g., image warping and morphing) for image synthesis will be presented in the course. Furthermore, methods for reconstructing three-dimensional scenes including camera calibration, Epipolar geometry, and stereo feature matching are introduced. Other important topics include optical flow, shape from shading, and three-dimensional object recognition. In conclusion, students learn and practice image processing and computer vision techniques that can be used in other areas such as robotics, pattern recognition, and sensor networks. Prerequisite: ENEE 3311.

3630 Pattern Recognition (4 credits)

This class provides an introduction to classical pattern recognition. Pattern recognition is the assignment of a physical object or event to one of several prescribed categories. Application include automated object recognition in image and videos, face identification, and optical character recognition. Major topics include: Bayesian decision theory, Parametric estimation and supervised learning, Linear discriminant functions, Nonparametric methods, Feature extraction for representation and classification, Support Vector Machines.

3830 Special Topics (CPE) (1 to 5 credits)

Special topics in computer engineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

Topics in computer engineering investigated under faculty supervision. May be taken more than once. Students must obtain and complete an Independent Study form from the Office of the Registrar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 
Electrical Engineering (ENEE)
2011 Circuits I (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2011) An introduction to electrical circuits analysis and design. Emphasis is on definitions of basic variables, passive circuit components and the ideal operational amplifier. DC analysis of circuits and circuit theorems are stressed. AC signals are introduced. Computer analysis software is integrated throughout the course. A relevant topic in engineering ethics is also explored. Co-requisites: PHYS 1213/1214, MATH 1953, ENEE 2015 or permission of instructor.

2015 Engineering Applications I (1 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2012) Laboratory program introduces electronic test equipment, verifies circuit theorems and practices elementary interface circuit design. Corequisite: ENEE 2011 or permission of instructor.

2021 Circuits II (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2021) AC analysis of linear circuits to include circuit theorems via classical and transform techniques. Emphasis is placed on the Laplace transform, including use of pole-zero and Bode diagrams to analyze and design circuits, including multiple filters (single-pole cascade, Butterworth, Chebyshev), and step-response circuits. Phasors applications to sinusoidal steady state analysis and AC power. Computer analysis software is used as an aid to circuit design. A relevant topic in engineering ethics is also explored. Prerequisites: ENEE 2011, ENEE 2015. Co-requisites: MATH 2070, ENEE 2025.

2025 Engineering Applications II (1 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2025) Laboratory program practicing time and frequency domain analysis and design techniques on step response and filter problems. Applications to instrumentation and circuits. Prerequisites: ENEE 2011, ENEE 2015. Corequisite: ENEE 2021 or permission of instructor.

2211 Electronics (4 credits)

Circuit behavior of semiconductor devices. Bipolar and field-effect transistors and their models; basic physical explanation of the functioning of these devices; large- and- small-signal analysis of practical circuits; electronic design using both hand and computer methods of calculation and design; biasing methods for amplifier circuits; power supplies and current-source circuits. Design laboratory. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, ENEE 2025.

2222 Advanced Electronics (3 credits)

High frequency transistor models and determination of parameters; Laplace and Fourier analyses of common amplifier circuits; design and analysis of broad-band amplifiers and of multistage amplifiers. Basic feedback topologies; Nyquist, root-locus and Bode plot investigations of stability; introduction to amplifier noise; active filter design; sinusoidal oscillators. Prerequisite: ENEE 2211.

2611 Engineering Electromagnetics (4 credits)

The study of Maxwell's equations and their experimental and theoretical foundations. Topics include Static electromagnetics fields, time-varying electromagnetic fields, wave propagation, transmission lines, and antennas. Prerequisites: PHYS 1213/1214 and ENGR 3610.

3011 Physical Electronics (0 or 4 credits)

The basic physical concepts of electronics, electrons and holes in semiconductors, transport and optical processes. Concentration on device concepts, including material synthesis and device processing, P-N junction diodes, junctions with other materials, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors (JFET, MESFET, MOSFET) and optoelectronic effect transistors (JFET, MESFET, MOSFET) and optoelectronic devices (lasers, detectors). Prerequisites: CHEM 1010/1610, PHYS 1213/1214 or permission of instructor.

3030 Optoelectronics (4 credits)

The active and passive optical elements. Includes principles of light, optical sources (LED, LASER, Fiber Laser), optical fibers, photodetectors (APD, PIN, MSM) and practical optical transmitter and receivers. Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENEE 3011 or ENEE 2211 or permission of instructor.

3035 Photonics (4 credits)

Theory and techniques for the application of the optical electromagnetic spectrum from infrared to ultraviolet to engineering problems in communications, instrumentation and measurement. May include lasers, optical signal processing, holography, nonlinear optics, optical fiber communications, optical behavior of semiconductors, and similar topics in modern optics, depending on the interests and requirements of the students. Prerequisite: ENEE 2611 or instructor's permission.

3111 Signals & Systems (0 or 4 credits)

Introduces continuous time and discrete time linear system analysis, Fourier series, Fourier transforms and Laplace transforms. Specific engineering tools for discrete time linear system analysis include discrete time convolution, Z-transform techniques, discrete Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform (DFT/FFT), and the design and analysis of analog and digital filters for real-world signal processing applications. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, MATH 2070.

3130 Principles of Communication Systems (3 credits)

Introduction to the theory and analysis of communication systems. Emphasis on analog systems; application of probability and statistics, modulations and demodulations; noise and signal-to-noise ratio analysis; the measure of information, channel capacity, coding and design factors. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

3141 Digital Communications (3 credits)

Introductory course on modern digital communication systems. The basic communication system theory, probability and random processes, baseband digital data transmission, coherent and non-coherent digital modulation techniques and analysis of bit error probability. Bandwidth efficiency and transmission of digital data through band- limited channels. Prerequisite: ENEE 3111, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

3150 Communications Systems Lab (3 credits)

Communication systems experiments demonstrating classical and applied features of digital and analog communication principles. Includes digital and analog modulation techniques. A consolidated laboratory experience for students in the communication sequence with a capstone design of a complete communications process, including source coding, channel coding, transmission over media, reception and decoding, followed by a detailed performance analysis of the reliability of the sequence of processes. Corequisites: ENEE 3130, ENEE 3141.

3611 Antennas and Antenna Arrays (4 credits)

Maxwell's equations applied to antenna analysis and design. Topics include fundamental parameters of antennas, radiation integrals and auxiliary potential functions, analysis and design of linear wire antennas, loop antennas, arrays, broadband antennas, frequency independent antennas, aperture antennas and horns. Integrated lab included. Prerequisite: ENEE 2611.

3620 Optical Fiber Communications (4 credits)

A comprehensive treatment of the theory and behavior of basic constituents, such as optical fibers, light sources, photodetectors, connecting and coupling devices, and optical amplifiers. The basic design principles of digital and analog optical fiber transmission links. The operating principles of wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and the components needed for its realization. Descriptions of the architectures and performance characteristics of complex optical networks for connecting users with a wide range of transmission needs (SONET/SDH). Discussions of advanced optical communication techniques, such as soliton transmission, optical code-division multiplexing (optical CDMA) and ultra-fast optical time-division multiplexing (OTDM). Laboratory. Prerequisite: ENEE 3030 or permission of instructor.

3641 Electromagnetic Compatibility (4 credits)

The study of the design of electronic systems so that they operate compatibly with other electronic systems and also comply with various governmental regulations on radiated and conducted emissions. Topics may include: Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) requirements for electronic systems; non-ideal behavior of components; radiated emissions and susceptibility; conducted emissions and susceptibility; shielding and system design for EMC. Includes integrated lab. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111, ENEE 2611 and ENEE 2222.

3646 CAD of Microwave Circuits (4 credits)

Microwave network analysis; analysis and design of planar transmission lines, impedance matching and tuning; analysis and design of 2-, 3- and 4-port passive networks; analysis and design of active microwave circuits; introduction to microwave systems. The lab portion incorporates software for analysis, design and optimization of passive and active, lumped and distributed circuits. Prerequisite: ENEE 2611 or permission of instructor.

3660 Communications Systems Design (4 credits)

Design and performance evaluation of terrestrial and space communications systems; error correction coding; spread spectrum communication; link budget analysis and environmental effects. System design considerations include engineering judgment decisions to implement optimum communication configurations such as data rates, bandwidth, modulation schemes and operating frequencies. Prerequisite: ENEE 3130.

3670 Introduction to Digital Signals Processing (4 credits)

Introduction to the theory and applications of Digital Signal Processing. Special attention is paid to the fast Fourier transform and convolution and to the design and implementation of both FIR and IIR digital filters. Prerequisite: ENEE 3111.

3810 Special Topics (EE) (1 to 5 credits)

Various topics in electrical engineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

Topics in electrical engineering investigated under faculty supervision. May be taken more than once. Students must obtain and complete an Independent Study form from the Office of the Registrar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

 
Engineering (ENGR)
1511 Engineering Connections I (1 credits)

This is the first course in a three course sequence designed to help students bridge the gap from high school to a college environment in a very challenging major. Topics and activities include academic success strategies; interviewing engineering alumni; the ethics of the profession; visits to industry sites; seminars by industry and academic experts; establishing the relationships between math, science, and engineering courses with design projects; critical and creative thinking activities; tours of the research labs of the engineering professors; disseminating information on the dual degree programs, the MBA programs, the honor code, and engineering program structures; and readings from and discussions about articles from professional publications. Membership in a professional society is a required course component.

1521 Engineering Connections II (1 credits)

This is the second course in a three course sequence designed to help students bridge the gap from high school to a college environment in a very challenging major. Topics and activities include academic success strategies; interviewing engineering alumni; the ethics of the profession; visits to industry sites; seminars by industry and academic experts; establishing the relationships between math, science, and engineering courses with design projects; critical and creative thinking activities; tours of the research labs of the engineering professors; disseminating information on the dual degree programs, the MBA programs, the honor code, and engineering program structures; and readings from and discussions about articles from professional publications. Membership in a professional society is a required course component. Recommended prerequisite: ENGR 1611. Corequisite: ENGR 1621 or instructor approval.

1531 Engineering Connections III (1 credits)

This is the third course in a three course sequence designed to help students bridge the gap from high school to a college environment in a very challenging major. Topics and activities include academic success strategies; interviewing engineering alumni; the ethics of the profession; visits to industry sites; seminars by industry and academic experts; establishing the relationships between math, science, and engineering courses with design projects; critical and creative thinking activities; tours of the research labs of the engineering professors; disseminating information on the dual degree programs, the MBA programs, the honor code, and engineering program structures; and readings from and discussions about articles from professional publications. Membership in a professional society is a required course component. Recommended prerequisite: ENGR 1621. Corequisite: ENGR 1631 or instructor approval.

1572 Applied MATLAB Programming (3 credits)

 

The MATLAB programming environment is used to introduce engineering applications programming. It will include high performance numerical computation and visualization. Programming topics include an overview of an interactive programming environment, generation of m-files, variables and data types, arithmetic operators, mathematical functions, symbolic mathematics, graphic generation, use of programs in application specific toolboxes, embedding and calling C programs in m-files, file input/output, and commenting. Programming is oriented toward engineering problem solving. Prerequisites include exposure to calculus and programming. Prerequisites: COMP 1571, MATH 1951, MATH 1952.

1611 Engr Concepts & Practice I (0 or 4 credits)

Introduction to concepts and practice in computer, electrical and mechanical engineering including engineering ethics. Engineering problem-solving as it applies to engineering analysis, synthesis and design. Students practice structured teamwork and program management skills in the context of projects. Emphasis on computer tools with immediate application to engineering practice.

1621 Engr Concepts & Practice II (0 to 3 credits)

Introduction to elementary concepts and practices in electrical engineering and electronics including electrical current and voltage and basic electrical circuit analysis, assembly and testing. Students are required to complete a simple project including mechanical and electrical components during which they practice teamwork while gaining skills in electrical system troubleshooting. Introduction to Multisim circuit analysis software and engineering ethics are among other topics covered in this course. Prerequisite: ENGR 1611.

1631 Engr Concepts & Practice III (0 or 3 credits)

Concepts III provides first-year engineering students the opportunity to explore fundamental computer engineering concepts. Lectures include the fundamentals of digital electronics. In the laboratory students use logic circuits to build analog to digital converter and program and microprocessor in assembly language to use signals from ultrasound sensors to control an autonomous vehicle. A report including a detailed analysis of the vehicle control system, flow charts, and program documentation is required. Prerequisites: ENGR 1611, ENGR 1621.

1700 Machine Shop Practice (1 credits)

Introduction to concepts and practice in basic machine tool work (i.e. mill, lathe, welding etc.). The course provides the necessary information for majors and non-majors to gain access to the DU Engineering Machine Shop. Class size is limited to 5 students per quarter. Enrollment priority will be given to engineering majors.

1911 Intro to Engineering I (2 credits)

This course is intended for transfer students who have had an introduction to engineering, but who need to learn certain techniques and software typically dealt with in ENGR 1611 including engineering ethics.

1921 Intro in Engineering II (1 credits)

This course is intended mainly for transfer students who have had an instructions to engineering, but who need to learn certain techniques and software typically dealt with in ENGR 1621 including engineering ethics.

1931 Intro to Engineering III (1 credits)

THis course is intended mainly for transfer students who have had an introduction to engineering, but who need to learn certain techniques and software typically dealt with in ENGR 1631 including engineering ethics.

2035 Engineering Applications III (0 or 3 credits)

Topics from computer, electrical and mechanical engineering demonstrating the interdependence of the disciplines including engineering ethics. Principles and use of transducers and data acquisition systems. Techniques for signal conditioning and analysis of experimental data. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, ENME 2520, COMP 1572. Corequisites: ENEE 2101, ENME 2710 or permission of instructor.

2610 Engineering Integration I (0 to 3 credits)

Interdisciplinary course combining topics from computer, electrical and mechanical engineering including engineering ethics, with emphasis on laboratory experience and the design, analysis and testing of interdisciplinary systems. Manufacture of mechanical systems and/or circuit boards. Team project work on interdisciplinary "design-and-build" projects. Prerequisites: ENGR 2035 and junior standing in the appropriate engineering discipline. Corequisite: enrollment in appropriate junior-level engineering courses.

2620 Engineering Integration II (0 or 3 credits)

Interdisciplinary course combining topics from computer, electrical and mechanical engineering including engineering ethics, with emphasis on laboratory experience and the design, analysis and testing of interdisciplinary systems. Manufacture of mechanical systems and/or circuit boards. Team project work on interdisciplinary "design-and-build" projects. Prerequisite: ENGR 2610. Corequisite: enrollment in appropriate junior level engineering courses.

2910 Engineering Economics (3 credits)

This course focuses on the practical application of economics to engineering. It explains concepts in accounting and finance and applies them to engineering situations. Topics that are discussed include: economic decision making, engineering cost and estimates, interest, inflation, depreciation, income taxes, minimum attractive rate of return, economic viability of projects, and the economic advantages of "green" technology.

2950 Engineering Assessment I (0 credits)

Examination covering basic mathematics, science and sophomore-level engineering topics. Must be taken prior to obtaining senior status in engineering. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, ENME 2520, COMP 1572. Corequisites: ENGR 2035, ENCE 2101, ENME 2710.

3100 Instrumentation & Data Acqstn (4 credits)

This course examines different instrumentation techniques and describes how different measurement instruments work. Measurement devices include: length, speed, acceleration, force, torque, pressure, sound, flow, temperature, and advanced systems. This course also examines the acquisition, processing, transmission and manipulation of data. Prerequisite: PHYS 1214.

3200 Intro to Nanotechnology (4 credits)

In this highly interdisciplinary series of lectures spanning across Engineering, Physics, Chemistry and Biology, an introduction to the subject of nanotechnology is provided. The most important recent accomplishments so far in the application of nanotechnology in several disciplines are discussed. Then a brief overview of the most important instrumentation systems used by nanotechnologists is provided. The nature of nanoparticles, nanoparticle composites, carbon nanostructures, including carbon nanotubes and their composites is subsequently discussed. The course also deals with nanopolymers, nanobiological systems, and nanoelectronic materials and devices. The issues of modeling of nanomaterials and nanostructures are also covered in this class. Multiscale modeling based on finite element simulations, Monte Carlo methods, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations are briefly addressed. Most importantly, students should obtain appreciation of developments in nanotechnology outside their present area of expertise. Prerequisite: ENME 2410.

3210 Intro Nano-Electro-Mechanics (4 credits)

Familiarize science and engineering students to the electromechanical aspects of the emerging field of Nanotechnology (NEMS). NEMS is a relatively new and highly multidisciplinary field of science and technology with applications in the state of the art and future sensors, actuators, and electronics. Starting with an overview of nanotechnology and discussion on the shifts in the electromechanical behavior and transduction mechanisms when scaling the physical dimensions from centimeters to micro-meters and then down to nanometers. Several electromechanical transduction mechanisms at the micro and nanoscale are presented and discussed in an application based context. New electromechanical interactions appearing in the nano and molecular scale, such as intra-molecular forces and molecular motors, are discussed. A detailed discussion and overview of nanofabrication technologies and approaches are also provided. Prerequisite: must be an Engineering or Science major of at least junior standing.

3215 NEMS and Nanofabrication Lab (4 credits)

This course provides science and engineering students with comprehensive hands-on experience in design, fabrication and characterization of Nanoscale Electromechanical Systems (NEMS). This laboratory-based course starts with a number of sessions including brief lectures reviewing the fundamentals and theories followed by pre-designed lab experiments. The students are then provided with a choice of different comprehensive design and implementation examples. The exapmles include design, layout, fabrication, and characterization of the devices. Prerequisite: ENGR 3210.

3220 Intro. to MEMS Microsystems (4 credits)

This course introduces students to the multi-disciplinary field of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technology. MEMS and Microsystem technology is the integration of micro-scale electro-mechanical elements, sensors, actuators, and electronics on a common substrate or platform through semiconductor microfabrication technologies. The course gives a brief overview of the involved physical phenomena, electromechanical transduction mechanisms, design principles, as well as fabrication and manufacturing technologies.

3313 Engineering Design Project I (2 credits)

Planning, development and execution of an engineering design project. The project may be interdisciplinary, involving aspects of computer, electrical and mechanical engineering. Projects have economic, ethical, social and other constraints, as appropriate. Design activities include: 1) preparation and presentation of proposals in response to requests-for-proposals from "customers," including problem description, quantitative and qualitative criteria for success, alternate designs and project plans; 2) generation and analysis of alternate designs, and choice of best design; 3) formulation of test procedures to demonstrate that the design chosen meets the criteria for success, and testing of the completed project where feasible; 4) reporting on the design and testing. Prerequisite: senior standing in engineering.

3314 Honors Thesis I (2 credits)

Honors equivalent of ENGR 3313. Required of students in the Honors Program and of students graduating summa cum laude, in place of ENGR 3313. In addition to the requirements given for ENGR 3313, the student must submit a copy of the final report on the project to an engineering department.

3323 Engineering Design Project II (3 credits)

Planning, development and execution of an engineering design project. The project may be interdisciplinary, involving aspects of computer, electrical and mechanical engineering. Projects have economic, ethical, social and other constraints, as appropriate. Design activities include: 1) preparation and presentation of proposals in response to requests-for-proposals from "customers," including problem description, quantitative and qualitative criteria for success, alternate designs and project plans; 2) generation and analysis of alternate designs, and choice of best design; 3) formulation of test procedures to demonstrate that the design chosen meets the criteria for success, and testing of the completed project where feasible; 4) reporting on the design and testing. Prerequisite: ENGR 3313.

3324 Honors Thesis II (3 credits)

Honors equivalent of ENGR 3323. Required of students in the Honors Program and of students graduating summa cum laude in place of ENGR 3323. In addition to requirements given for ENGR 3323, the student must submit a copy of the final report on the project to and engineering department.

3333 Engineering Design Project III (3 credits)

Planning, development and execution of an engineering design project. The project may be interdisciplinary, involving aspects of computer, electrical and mechanical engineering. Projects have economic, ethical, social and other constraints, as appropriate. Design activities include: 1) preparation and presentation of proposals in response to requests-for-proposals from "customers," including problem description, quantitative and qualitative criteria for success, alternate designs and project plans; 2) generation and analysis of alternate designs, and choice of best design; 3) formulation of test procedures to demonstrate that the design chosen meets the criteria for success, and testing of the completed project where feasible; 4) reporting on the design and testing. Prerequisite: ENGR 3323.

3334 Honors Thesis III (3 credits)

Honors equivalent of ENGR 3333. Required of students in the Honors Program and of students graduating summa cum laude, in place of ENGR 3333. In addition to the requirements given for ENGR 3333, the student must submit a copy of the final report on the project to an engineering department.

3350 Reliability (4 credits)

An overview of reliability-based design. Topics include: fundamentals of statistics, probability distributions, determining distribution parameters, design for six sigma, Monte Carlo simulation, first and second order reliability methods (FORM, SORM), Most Probable Point (MPP) reliability methods, sensitivity factors, probabilistic design.

3510 Renewable & Effic. Power Sys. (4 credits)

This course introduces the current and future sustainable electrical power systems. Fundamentals of renewable energy sources and storage systems are discussed. Interfaces of the new sources to the utility grid are covered. Prerequisite: ENEE 2021.

3520 Intro to Power Electronics (4 credits)

This covers fundamentals of power electronics. We discuss various switching converters topologies. Basic knowledge of Efficiency and small-signal modeling for the DC-DC switching converters are covered. Furthermore, magnetic and filter design are introduced. Prerequisites: ENEE 2211 and ENGR 3722.

3525 Pwr Elctncs & Rnwbl Enrgy Lab (1 credits)

In this course the fundamentals of switching converters and power electronics in a real laboratory set-up is covered. The course incorporates hardware design, analysis, and simulation of various switching converters as a power processing element for different energy sources. The energy sources are power utility, batteries, and solar panels. Prerequisite: ENGR 3520.

3530 Intro to Power and Energy Conservation Sys. (3 credits)

Basic concepts of AC systems, single-phase and three-phase networks, electric power generation, transformers, transmission lines, and electric machinery. Prerequisite: ENEE 2021.

3535 Electric Power Engineering Lab (1 credits)

In this laboratory, the magnetic circuits, single phase transformers, power quality and harmonics sychronous machines, Induction machines and DC machines are studied and tested in a real physical setup. Prerequisite: ENGR 3530.

3540 Electric Power Systems (4 credits)

This course covers methods of calculation of a comprehensive idea on the various aspects of power system problems and algorithms for solving these problems. Prerequisite: ENGR 3530.

3545 Electric Power Economy (3 credits)

This course covers economy aspects of electric power industry and the implications for power and energy engineering in the market environment. Prerequisite: ENGR 3530.

3550 Intro to Machine Drive Control (4 credits)

This course provides the basic theory for the analysis and application of adjustable-speed drive systems employing power electronic converters and ac or dc machines. Prerequisites: ENGR 3520 and ENGR 3530.

3610 Engineering Analysis (3 credits)

Applied mathematics for engineers. Generalized Fourier analysis, complex variables, vector calculus, introduction to Bessel functions, and applied probability and statistics. Prerequisites: MATH 2070, MATH 2080.

3620 Advanced Engineering Math (4 credits)

Applied mathematics for engineers. Systems and series solutions of ordinary differential equations, Fourier analysis, partial differential equations, linear algebra, vector calculus, special functions, unconstrained and combinatorial optimization, and applied probability and statistics. Prerequisites: MATH 2070 and MATH 2080.

3630 Finite Element Methods (4 credits)

Introduction to the use of finite element methods in one or two dimensions with applications to solid and fluid mechanics, heat transfer and electromagnetic fields; projects in one or more of the above areas. Prerequisite: ENGR 3610 or equivalent.

3721 Controls (3 or 4 credits)

Modeling, analysis and design of linear feedback control systems using Laplace transform methods. Techniques and methods used in linear mathematical models of mechanical, electrical, thermal and fluid systems are covered. Feedback control system models, design methods and performance criteria in both time and frequency domains. A linear feedback control system design project is required. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

3725 Digital Control (4 credits)

The course introduces and studies computer-controlled systems following the state variable approach and the z-transform approach. Sampling theory is presented, along with its effect on digital control design. Feedback computer controlled systems, components of digital control systems, system models on the z-domain (z-transfer functions) and on the time domain (state variable representations) are examined. Digital controller design from the state space and frequency domain points of view are included. System design and evaluation of system performance are considered. Several discrete-time controllers are presented, state and output feedback controllers, reconstruction of states using observers. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111 and ENGR 3610 or instructor permission. Students must have knowledge of MATLAB. Recommended prerequisite: ENGR 3721.

3730 Robotics (3 credits)

Introduction to the analysis, design, modeling and application of robotic manipulators. Review of the mathematical preliminaries required to support robot theory. Topics include forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, motion kinematics, trajectory control and planning, and kinetics. Prerequisites: ENME 2520 and MATH 2060 or MATH 2200 or permission of instructor.

3731 Robotics Lab (1 credits)

Laboratory that complements the analysis, design, modeling and application of robotic manipulators. Implementation of the mathematical structures required to support robot operation. Topics include forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, motion kinematics, trajectory control and planning and kinetics. Applications include programming and task planning of a manufacturing robot manipulator. Corerequisite: ENGR 3730 or permission of instructor.

3800 Special Topics (ENGR) (1 to 5 credits)

Special topics in engineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

3900 Engineering Internship (1 to 4 credits)

Students in engineering may receive elective credit for engineering work performed for engineering employers with the approval of the chair or associate chair of the department. At the end of the term, a student report on the work is required, and a recommendation will be required from the employer before a grade is assigned. Junior, senior, or graduate status in engineering is normally required. May not be used to satisfy technical requirements. May be taken more than one for a maximum of 6 qtr. hrs. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

3951 Engineering Assessment II (0 credits)

Students in Mechanical Engineering must register for and take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination (FE). All students must complete an engineering exit interview and other assessment related tasks. To be taken in the last quarter of attendance.

3970 Engineering Entrepreneurship (4 credits)

The course presents an overview of fundamentals of understanding entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial characteristics; the focus is on aspects of engineering entrepreneurship, technology-based innovation and new product development. Topics to be covered: learning an industry; recognizing and creating opportunities; new product development process, phases and cycle, risks and benefits; 'testing' of an engineering-focused business concept; marketing, organizational plan strategies and financing for new start ups. Special attention is given to technological innovation, considering both incremental or routine innovation, and more radical or revolutionary changes in products and processes. Prerequisite: ENGR 3610 or permission of the instructor.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

Topics in engineering investigated under faculty supervision. May be taken more than once. Students must obtain and complete an Independent Study form from the Office of the Registrar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Mechatronic Systems Engineering (ENMT)
3210 Mechatronics I (4 credits)

This course provides basic concepts from electrical, mechanical, and computer engineering as applied to mechatronic systems; and is intended to serve as a foundation course for further exploration in the area of mechatronics. Prerequisite: Senior or graduate standing in engineering.

3220 Mechatronics II (4 credits)

Real-time systems require timely response by a computer to external stimuli. This course examines the issues associated with deterministic performance including basic computer architecture, scheduling algorithms, and software design techniques including data flow diagrams, real-time data flow diagrams, stat transition diagrams, and petri nets. In the lab portion of this class, students program a microcontroller to interact with mechatronic devices. Prerequisites: ENMT 3210, ENCE 3210 or COMP 3354.

3800 Special Topics (Mechatronics) (1 to 5 credits)

Various topics in Mechatronics System Engineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

Mechanical Engineering (ENME)
2410 Materials Science I (3 credits)

Atomic structure, bonding and crystal structures in solids. Diffusion and crystal defects. Thermodynamics and phase equilibria in one-, two- and three-component systems, binary phase diagrams. Kinetics and phase transformations. Specific microstructure and mechanical properties of metals, glasses, ceramics, polymers and composites. Electrical conduction: energy levels and bands, charge carriers and insulators. Semiconductors of intrinsic and extrinsic types. Prerequisites: PHYS 1212, CHEM 1010/1610, MATH 1953 or permission of instructor.

2421 Materials Science II (3 credits)

Atomic structure, bonding and crystal structures in solids. Diffusion and crystal defects. Thermodynamics and phase equalibria in one-, two- and three-component systems, binary phase diagrams. Kinetics and phase transformations. Specific microstructure and mechanical properties of metals, glasses, ceramics, polymers and composites. Electrical conduction: energy levels and bands, charge carriers and insulators. Semiconductors of intrinsic and extrinsic types. Laboratory projects/demonstrations. Prerequisite: ENME 2410.

2510 Engineering Mechanics I (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2510) Statics of particles, and rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, frames and machines, friction, centroids and centers of mass, moments of inertia, virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods for particles and systems of particles, angular momentum, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. A relevant topic in engineering ethics is also explored. Prerequisite: PHYS 1211. Corequisite: MATH 1953.

2520 Engineering Mechanics II (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2520) Statics of particles and rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, frames and machines, friction, centroids and centers of mass, moments of inertia, virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. A relevant topic in engineering ethics is also explored. Prerequisite: ENME 2510. Corequisite: MATH 2070.

2530 Engineering Mechanics III (3 credits)

(Co-listed with PHYS 2530) Statics of particles and rigid bodies, equivalent systems of forces, frames and machines, friction, centroids and centers of mass, moments of inertia, virtual work. Kinematics of particles, Newton's second law, energy and momentum methods for particles and systems of particles, angular momentum, impulsive motion, kinematics and motion of rigid bodies in two and three dimensions; accelerated frames of reference; mechanical vibrations. Prerequisite: ENME 2520, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

2541 Mechanics of Materials (3 credits)

Normal and shear stress and strain; elasticity, mechanical properties of materials, principal stresses; torsion, beams, deflection of beams under loads, methods of superposition, failure theory, columns. Prerequisite: ENME 2520.

2651 Fluid Mech/Heat Transfer I (3 credits)

Course series provides students with the basic skill levels required to solve fluid-mechanics and heat transfer problems. Topics include hydrostatics, dimensional analysis, incompressible and compressible flows, conduction, convection and radiation. Students explore a variety of solution techniques such as control volume, differential analysis, boundary layer analysis, finite differencing and resistance network analogies. Prerequisite: ENME 2520.

2661 Fluid Mech/Heat Transfer II (3 credits)

Course series provides students with the basic skills levels required to solve fluid-mechanics and heat transfer problems. Topics include hydrostatics, dimensional analysis, incompressible and compressible flows, conduction, convection and radiation. Students explore a variety of solution techniques such as control volume, differential analysis, boundary layer analysis, finite differencing and resistance network analogies. Prerequisite: ENME 2651.

2671 Fluid Mech/Heat Transfer III (3 credits)

Course series provides students with the basic skill levels required to solve fluid-mechanics and heat transfer problems. Topics include hydrostatics, dimensional analysis, incompressible and compressible flows, conduction, convection and radiation. Students explore a variety of solution techniques such as control volume, differential analysis, boundary layer analysis, finite differencing and resistance network analogies. Prerequisite: ENME 2661.

2710 Engineering Thermodynamics I (3 credits)

Properties of a pure substance. Use of tables of properties. First and second laws of thermodynamics for closed and open systems. Work, heat, power and entropy. Engine, power plant and refrigeration cycles. Gas mixtures, thermodynamic relations and chemical reactions. Prerequisite: PHYS 1212.

2720 Engineering Thermodynamics II (3 credits)

Properties of a pure substance. Use of tables of properties. First and second laws of thermodynamics for closed and open systems. Work, heat, power and entropy. Engine, power plant and refrigeration cycles. Gas mixtures, thermodynamic relations and chemical reactions. Prerequisite: ENME 2710.

2810 Mech Engineering Lab I (3 credits)

Engineering experiments illustrating selected topics in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, thermodynamics, measurement and control. Use of microcomputers in experimentation and control. This course encourages the development of laboratory experimentation skills, design skills and technical writing skills. Prerequisites: ENME 2651, ENME 2720, ENME 2541 or permission of instructor.

2820 Mech Engineering Lab II (3 credits)

Engineering experiments illustrating selected topics in heat transfer, fluid mechanics, solid mechanics, thermodynamics, measurement and control. Use of microcomputers in experimentation and control. This course encourages the development of laboratory experimentation skills, design skills and technical writing skills. Prerequisite: ENME 2810 or permission of instructor.

3230 Intro to Nondestructive Eval (3 credits)

Principles of nondestructive evaluation, including ultrasonic, radiographic, magnetic, electrical, penetrant, acoustic emission, etc. Covers expected results for flaw and materials characterization. Current literature approaches are examined. Prerequisite: ENGR 3610.

3310 Comp Methods for Mech & Matrls (4 credits)

An introductory course for the general-purpose computational methods in advanced multiscale materials and mechanics. Students learn the fundamentals on the numerical methods used in mechanical and materials engineering.

3400 Fatigue (4 credits)

A detailed overview of fatigue. Topics include: stress life and strain life approaches, fracture mechanics, constant amplitude and spectrum loading, life prediction, fatigue at notches, microstructural effects, environmentally assisted fatigue, retardation and acceleration, multi-axial fatigue, design against fatigue, and reliability.

3511 Machine Design (3 credits)

Application of statics, dynamics, mechanics of materials and manufacturing processes to the design of machine elements and systems. Properties of materials and design criteria. Synthesis and analysis of a machine design project. Prerequisites: ENME 2520, ENME 2541.

3540 Intro to Continuum Mechanics (3 credits)

Kinematics of deformation, measures of stress, equations of motion for deformable solids; constitutive relations for elastic, visoelastic and elastic-plastic materials; work and energy. Prerequisites: ENME 2530 and ENME 2541.

3545 Mechanisms (4 credits)

Synthesis, analysis and use of mechanisms. Mechanisms studied include cams, gears and planar linkages, with an emphasis on planar linkages. Prerequisites: ENME 2530 and COMP 1572.

3550 Mechanical Vibrations (3 credits)

Basic mechanical vibrations including: dynamics, periodic motion, energy methods and Rayleigh's principle, forced periodic motion, initial conditions and transient vibration, damping, damped forced vibrations, several degrees of freedom, torsional vibration, discrete and distributed systems. Prerequisites: ENME 2530, ENGR 3610.

3555 Advanced Dynamics (3 credits)

Introduction to variational principles of mechanics. Lagrangian mechanics, three-dimensional rigid body mechanics, other topics. Applications. Prerequisites: ENME 2530, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

3560 Adv Mechanisms & Machinery (3 credits)

Advanced topics in the design and analysis of mechanisms. Topics may include: force analysis of mechanisms, force and moment balancing, flywheels, flexible mechanisms. Prerequisite: ENME 3545 or instructor's permission.

3651 Computational Fluid Dynamics (4 credits)

This course introduces principles and applications of computational methods in fluid flow and topics chosen from heat transfer, mass transfer or two phase flow. The conservation equations their discretations and solutions are presented. Convergence and validity of solutions along with computational efficiency are explored. Students learn to apply these techniques using the latest software packages. Prerequisite: ENME 2671 or instructor approval.

3731 Adv Engr Thermodynamics (3 credits)

Advanced topics in thermodynamics. Introduction to statistical thermodynamics. Prerequisites: ENME 2720, ENGR 3610 or instructor's permission.

3820 Special Topics (ME) (1 to 5 credits)

Mechanical engineering topics as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: vary with offering.

3860 Intro to Air Pollution (3 credits)

The thermodynamics, kinetics and photochemistry of air pollution. Origins and effects of particulate pollution, including light scattering. Effects of meteorology on air pollution. Prerequisite: MATH 1953.

3991 Independent Study (1 to 5 credits)

Topics in mechanical engineering investigated under faculty supervision. May be taken more than once. Students must obtain and complete an Independent Study form from the Office of the Registrar. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

Material Science (MTSC)
3010 Mech Behavior of Materials (4 credits)

Effects of microstructure on mechanical behavior of materials (metals, polymers, ceramics and composites); emphasis on recent developments in materials science, modulus, fracture (fracture toughness and brittle strength), fatigue, creep, wear, friction, stress rupture and deformation. Prerequisite: ENME 2421.

3020 Composite Materials I (4 credits)

An introduction to composite materials. Properties of fibers and matrices, fiber architecture, elastic properties of laminae and laminates, interface in composites. Prerequisites: MATH 2030, ENME 2410, and ENME 2541.

3110 Thermodynamics of Solids (3 credits)

Relations among thermodynamic quantities, thermodynamics of phase transformations, chemical reactions, solutions, alloys and phase diagrams. Applications to solid-state properties of materials. Prerequisites: ENME 2710, ENME 2421.

3430 Diffraction & Structure I (3 credits)

Properties of X-rays, geometry of crystals, calculation of directions and intensities of diffracted beams from polycrystalline samples, experimental methods including computerized data acquisition and data reduction, detector characteristics, search/match methods for phase identification, determination of crystal structure (indexing). Laboratory exercises illustrating the above. Prerequisite: ENME 2410.

3450 Fracture Mechanics (4 credits)

Topics include: stress field at a crack tip, linear fracture mechanics, energy release rate, stress intensity factors, plastic zones, plane stress, plane strain, fracture toughness, airy stress functions, elastic-plastic fracture mechanics, J integral, crack tip opening displacements, experimental testing, fatigue, life prediction, crack closure, weight functions, failure analysis. Prerequisites: ENME 2421 and ENEM 2541.

 
Bioengineering (ENBI)
3100 Bioengineering System Design (1 to 3 credits)

This course will prepare students to participate in a capstone engineering design project. They will learn the ethical treatment of patients, identify and survey the needs of a patient population, identify leading projects, form a design team, discuss human factors issues, and develop an initial strategy for project design.

3500 Biofluids (4 credits)

The application of fluid dynamics theory and design to problems within the biomedical community. Specific topics covered include the mechanics of inhaled therapeutic aerosols, basic theory of circulation and blood flow, foundations in biotechnology and bioprocessing, and controlled drug delivery.

3510 Biomechanics (4 credits)

An introduction to the mechanical behavior of biological tissues and systems. Specific topics covered include: analysis of the human musculoskeletal system as sensors, levers, and actuators; joint articulations and their mechanical equivalents; kinematic and kinetic analysis of human motion; introduction to modeling human body segments and active muscle loading for analysis of dynamic activities; mechanical properties of hard and soft tissues; mechanical and biological consideration for repair and replacement of soft and hard tissue and joints; orthopedic implants. Prerequisites: ENME 2410, ENME 2520, and ENME 2541.

3800 Special Topics (ENBI) (1 to 5 credits)

Special topics in Bioengineering as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: varies with offering.

 
Computer Science (COMP)
1571 Procedural Programming I (3 credits)

The C programming language is used to introduce fundamental procedural programming including engineering applications. Programming topics include an overview of computers and programming languages, variables and data types, arithmetic operators, input/output, comments, control structures, user-defined functions, scope, constants, file I/O, and pointers. Prerequisite: High School algebra.

1572 Procedural Programming II (3 credits)

The Java programming language is used to introduce object-oriented programming. Topics include fundamental object-oriented concepts, class design and implementation, inheritance, polymorphism, exceptions, and event-driven programming. Prerequisite: COMP 1571.

 
2370 Intro Algorithms & Data Struct (4 credits)

Performance analysis of algorithms; data structures and their physical storage representation; recursive techniques; stacks, queues, lists, trees, sets, graphs; sorting and searching algorithms. Prerequisites: MATH 2200 or COMP 2300 and COMP 2673.

 
3361 Operating Systems I (4 credits)

Operating systems functions and concepts; processes, process communication, synchronization; processor allocation, memory management in multiprogramming, time sharing systems. Prerequisites: COMP 2355, COMP 2370, and COMP 2691.