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Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering & Computer Science

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Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering & Computer Science

News & Awards

New Computer Science Building Educates Students About Innovators In Their Field

By Kathryn Mayer, DU Journalist. July 2014

New Computer Science Wing

In 2002, with their naming donation to The Newman Center for the Performing Arts, Robert and Judi Newman engaged the heart of the university, bringing together DU student musicians and performers with the larger Denver community.
Now, with their new gift—one bolstering the computer science program—the Newmans are hoping to further engage the minds and talents of University of Denver students. More

Engineering Team Develops Landing Platform for Unmanned Vehicles

By Tamara Chapman, DU Journalist. July 7, 2014

UAV Platform

With help from his faculty advisors and from senior computer science whiz and soon-to-be graduate student Tom Hamill, Conyers has designed and built a prototype mobile self-leveling landing platform for UAVs, which is shorthand for unmanned aerial vehicles. More

DU Computer Science Team a Finalist in E3 College Video Game Competition

By Greg Glasgow, DU Journlist. June 5, 2014 

E3 contestants

Hardcore video gamers and those in the video game industry know that the annual E3 expo in Los Angeles is where the big games of tomorrow are demonstrated and discovered. Five students from the University of Denver’s computer science department will be in the mix this year, as they bring their game, Data Helix, to the convention as part of the E3 College Game Competition. More

Senior Matthew Watwood Balances Triple Major Demands With Ease

By: Annissa Leon, DU Journalist. June 5, 2014 

Matthew Watwood

When he’s not doing homework for his triple major in physics, math and computer science, University of Denver senior Matthew Watwood is pursuing his passion for magic, performing at Colorado Avalanche games and at Elitch Gardens, where he also leads physics presentations for high school students. More

No Recall of Fisher Price Soothe and Glow Seahorse Toddler Toy, Despite Fire Safety Concerns

By: Keli Rabon, DU Journalist, Sandra Barry at 7NEWS. February 24, 2014

Dr.Gao- Expert on 7NEWS Investigates

A 7NEWS investigation has revealed serious safety concerns about one of the most popular children's toys on the market that is still being sold in stores despite consumer calls for a recall. Dr. David Gao, DU Electrical Engineering expert is called in to asses the situation. More

DU Faculty Awards - John Evans Professor Kimon Valavanis

By: Richie School of Engineering and Computer Science. January 13, 2014

John Evans Professor Kimon Valavanis

On Thursday, October 3, 2013 Dr. Kimon Valavanis was officially awarded the 2013-2014 "John Evans Professorship". The "John Evans Professorship," named in honor of Dr. John Evans, the founder of the University of Denver, is the most prestigious award a faculty member can receive at the University of Denver. Selection is granted in recognition of national and international distinction for outstanding research or other creative, scholarly achievement. Professor Kimon Valavanis is the current Chair of the Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering, Kimon is an active researcher and international recognized for having a beautiful mind. Presently, we can officially call Professor Kimon Valavanis, the Ritchie School's fourth faculty member to receive the "John Evans Professorship."

Watch the DU²SRI Research Facility in action!

Usage-Based Auto Insurance Found to Pose Privacy Risks

By: Jaikumar Vijayan at Computerworld. September 27, 2013

Computerworld Magazine

Even the non-tracking driving habits data collected by insurers can reveal a lot, researchers say pay-as-you-drive insurance plans, where premiums are based on an individual's actual driving habits, pose a potential privacy risk for motorists, a recent study has found. The study, conducted by researchers at the University of Denver, Colorado, found that driving habits data such as speed, time of travel, number of miles driven, braking and acceleration data could paint a surprisingly detailed picture of an individual's movement in a specific time period. More

Undergrad Shares Work at Prestigious Engineering Conference

By  DU Reporter. September 18, 2013 

Justin Hollenbeck

It starts with passion. That's the best way to explain senior Justin Hollenbeck's ambition. Even as a high school student, he was fascinated by the human body and how it moves.

During Hollenbeck's freshman year at the University of Denver, the mechanical engineering major capitalized on that fascination, plunging into serious research at the Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science's Center for Orthopaedic Biomechanics. There, he worked alongside Associate Professor Peter Laz in the Probabilistic Mechanics Lab and Professor Paul Rullkoetter in the Computational Biomechanics Lab, learning how to apply engineering principles to the investigation of clinically relevant issues. The center offers undergraduate and graduate students a hands-on opportunity to develop and advance technologies that lead to improved outcomes for patients. More

Threat to Privacy Found in Auto Insurance 'pay as you drive' Programs

By: Dick Jones Communications. September 10, 2013

Science Daily

Yes, those "pay as you drive" programs used by insurance companies to record your driving habits sometimes can be used to accurately infer your destination -- a long-time concern of privacy advocates.

That's what four University of Denver computer scientists found in an experiment. "With access to simple features such as driving speed and distance travelled, inferring the destinations of driving trips is possible," they write in a paper published in the proceedings of the 2013 ACM Workshop on Privacy in the Electronic Society in November. "Privacy advocates have presumed the existence of location privacy threats in non-tracking telematics data collection practices. Our work shows that the threats are real." More

Robot May Help Kids With Autism Become More Sociable

By: Andrea Dukakis from Colorado Public Radio. August 23, 2013

Dr. Mahoor NAO Robot,Autism Assist Research

Dr. Mohammad Mahoor and his robot Nao were guests on the series called "Colorado Matters", hosted by Colorado Public Radio (CPR). The series focuses on the state of Colorado's people, issues and ideas. Listen to the interview here: Colorado Public Radio 

Additional Links:
Dr. Mahoor's research video with Nao.
Facebook: Autism Humanoid Robot Research
Dr. Mahoor's research website
To participate in the research, contact roboassist@du.edu

Engineering School Uses Robot to Help Kids With Autism Disorder

By: Tamara Chapman, DU Journalist, July 15, 2013

Autism & Robotics Research Dr. Mahoor ECE

A robot named NAO is helping a faculty-student research team conduct a pilot study exploring whether humanoid robots can improve social and communication skills in children with autism spectrum disorders  (ASD).

For children growing up with ASD, interacting successfully with others often presents enormous challenges. When it’s customary to make eye contact, children with ASD often gaze elsewhere. When a smile would be appropriate, they may deliver a scowl. And when a playmate communicates frustration via a facial expression, autistic children often don’t recognize the signal, responding with behavior that makes matters worse. More

Trio of Gifts Adds Up to $40M For University of Denver

By: L. Wayne Hicks, Associate Editor at the Denver Business Journal. May 20, 2013

Daniel Ritchie speech

Three donors have given the University of Denver a combined $40 million, with $27 million coming from former chancellor Daniel Ritchie.

The donations will allow DU to add an engineering and computer science building, which will house a new interdisciplinary Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) initiative. The new building also will be home to the new Knoebel Center for the Study of Aging. More

University Announces Gifts To Fund New Engineering Building And STEM Initiative

By: DU Magazine Staff. May 20, 2013

new secs building image

An architect’s model shows the new Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science between Olin Hall and the Newman Center for the Performing Arts. Photo: Wayne Armstrong

The largest financial gift in University of Denver history will go toward the construction of a new campus home for Engineering and Computer Science. Chancellor Emeritus Daniel Ritchie has donated more than $27 million to build the Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering and Computer Science, which will be named for his father. The 110,000-square-foot building on the south side of campus also will house the new Knoebel Center for the Study of Aging. It is slated to be completed in early 2015.

"We have wonderful faculty; we have wonderful students; what we don't have is wonderful facilities. That's the piece that's missing," Daniel Ritchie said at a May 20 press conference to announce the new building. "This will make a huge difference for the University, for the faculty and for our students."  More