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SUMMER@DU

Students in the classroom

Summer @ DU

Courses

Check back often to view the most up to date course information

Plan ahead and browse the full list of undergraduate summer courses. (For graduate courses, see the online course schedule on PioneerWeb.) You can find a detailed description of each class under the course name.

Current students must register through PioneerWeb. Visiting students from other colleges and universities must register by contacting the Office of the Registrar.

Please note: Course listings are based on the most recent information available. Courses are subject to change with enrollment.

About online courses

Many of the summer courses will be offered online, which means that you can take the course from anywhere as long as you have reliable access to the Internet. Most of these courses are condensed, which means that the courses are very intensive, often requiring you to spend 20 hours per week on the course. If you plan to enroll in an online course, please visit the FAQ page for important information about online courses.

If you're considering taking an online course, the following links provide valuable resources to learn more about:

Online learning
http://otl.du.edu/teaching-resources/the-successful-online-learner/

Online course readiness assessment
https://udenver.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_6ShRkNdLNdgwR9j

 

View: Register Here
Accounting (ACTG)
ACTG 2010 - Survey of Accounting (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Brothers, Douglas
CRN: 1021
Course Description

Accounting for running a business, with modules on financial accounting and a focus on managerial accounting. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Business minors only.

ACTG 2200 - Introduction to Financial Reporting
T R06/13 - 08/0310:00 am to 12:35 pmGreiner, Adam
CRN: 1184
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to accounting and its relevance in the business world. Students learn how to analyze transactions and prepare financial statements. In addition, students are introduced to publicly traded company's annual reports and 10k's. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 1.

ACTG 2300 - Accounting for Decision Making (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
T R06/13 - 08/111:00 pm to 3:10 pmDavisson, Kathleen
CRN: 1022
Course Description

Introduces or reinforces concepts and techniques for using accounting information for managerial purposes. The focus is on interpreting financial information and making business decisions, not accumulating or preparing accounting information. Prerequisites: degree checkpoint 1 and ACTG 2200.

ACTG 3220 - Understanding Financial Statements
T R06/13 - 08/0310:00 am to 12:35 pmHarrison, Paul
CRN: 1185
Course Description

Provides business majors with the necessary understanding to read, interpret, and use published financial statements. Cross listed with ACTG 4222. Prerequisites: ACTG 2200 and degree checkpoint 1.

ACTG 3462 - Corporate & Partnership Tax (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M W06/13 - 08/111:00 pm to 3:10 pmHarrison, Paul
CRN: 1023
Course Description

Federal income tax as applied to the formation, operation and dissolution of business entities. Determination of corporate taxable income, special deductions, credits, methods of computing tax liability and estimated tax requirements. Determination of partnership and S Corporation ordinary income; classification and amount of separately stated items allocable to partners and S Corporation shareholders in accordance with the conduit principle. Prerequisites: degree checkpoint 2 and ACTG 3036 or ACTG 3440.

Advanced Seminar (ASEM)
ASEM 2423 - The American Road Trip (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/221:00 pm to 4:20 pmAlfrey, Shawn
CRN: 1475
Course Description

As Frederick Jackson Turner told us back in the 19th Century, American cultural identity has hinged on the idea of an ever-receding frontier and the possibility of reaching it. We will chart how the road figures as both a promise and a burden, and how it reflects changing social and cultural issues in American life. We will consider documents of fiction, philosophy and history as well as film and aspects of popular culture as we consider the America fascination with the road and the careers of its many and diverse travelers. Enrollment restricted to students in the Honors Program.

ASEM 2516 - Do the Wicked Prosper? (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Dixon, Sandra
CRN: 1242
Course Description

This course revolves around a question, which is famously quoted from the Bible, "Why do the wicked prosper?" The quotation presupposes that the wicked do prosper, but many strands of human thought challenge the supposition. This course examines the students' reactions to this question and leads them to approach the question and their reactions to it from a variety of academic perspectives.

ASEM 2529 - Analyzing the American Dream - Expressionist Film in 1950's Hollywood (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Gault, James
CRN: 1274
Course Description

This course focuses on the output of a few Hollywood directors (primarily Ida Lupino, Nicholas Ray and Douglas Sirk) who seem to reflect the dominant ideologies of post-war Hollywood. On the surface, their films celebrate middle-class success, a simple American can-do attitude and, most important for this class, characters who seem to reestablish pre-war expectations of femininity and masculinity. Rules of femininity, masculinity and sexuality are a constant focus for these directors, and each has his or her own approach to exploring the repercussions of strict gender assignment.

ASEM 2539 - Health, Media and the Self (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Botta, Renee
CRN: 1328
Course Description

What are cultural beliefs about health, about prevention and about risk? We focus on how culture, media, peers, medical professionals and family influence how we construct and define health and the many key concepts scholars have linked to the notion of being healthy, preventing ill health and pursuing good health. We also examine the impact and function of these definitions on our everyday lives by exploring what health perceptions have to do with one's self concept, identity, self esteem, relationships, expectations, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors.

ASEM 2557 - Body & Sexuality in Religions (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:40 pmSchofield, Alison
CRN: 1243
Course Description

This course examines the unique place of the body in biblical religion. We ask how the Bible and its interpreters have shaped current views on sex and the gendered body in Western society. How has the Bible been (mis)used in relation to current understandings of the physical body? Is the saying that a "human" does not have a body, but is a body as true for the Hebrew Bible as the Christian New Testament? How has Judaism and Christianity (de)valued sexuality, procreation and celibacy? How do the biblical traditions shape our modern opinions about the ideal physical body and body modification? How can we understand "out-of-body" experiences and notions of death and afterlife in Western religion? Students are encouraged to interpret the Bible and their own beliefs from a uniquely embodied perspective.

ASEM 2560 - America Through Foreign Eyes (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Demont-Heinrich, Christof
CRN: 1275
Course Description

The United States, and Americans, occupy a unique, privileged and powerful position in the contemporary world order. Indeed, according to many scholarly and public accounts, the U.S. has achieved unprecedented status as the preeminent world power. Yet, despite or, paradoxically, perhaps because of its status as what some have called a world "hyperpower," large numbers of Americans are mostly, if not totally unaware of what U.S. global preeminence means to them and to other people around the world. This course aims to inspire critical reflection on the student's part about the role of the United States - its political and economic systems and practices, its culture, and most fundamentally its social actors, meaning its people(s), in a globalizing world.

ASEM 2566 - Society Through Literature and Cinema (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1518
Course Description

This course will study the interconnection of human societies (or nation states) as evident in different kinds of narratives. Discussing literary and film narratives in particular, we will examine the beliefs and influences that shape relationships within the same society as well as the beliefs and influences that shape relationships between different peoples and societies. Our examination will include an exploration of how these beliefs and influences are generated and modified. Our study will be aided by the interpretive insights of artists and visionaries. Our examples will be taken from different regions of the world.

ASEM 2572 - Philosophy, Psychology, Neuroscience, and Free Will (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/011:00 pm to 4:20 pmBrent, Michael
CRN: 1123
Course Description

This seminar introduces students to the topic of human freedom from the perspective of philosophy, neuroscience, and psychology. If everything that you do and have ever done is the inevitable byproduct of the political, social, economic, cultural, familial, psychological, and neurological forces at work within and around you, in what sense could you be free and morally accountable for your actions? In what sense could you be worthy of praise for your accomplishments and blame for your failures? The course will address the topic of free will using contemporary scholarship in philosophy, neuroscience, and developmental and social psychology, and we will ask questions such as: What, exactly, is free will? What can our understanding of causation tell us about free will? What is moral responsibility, and how is it related to free will? What brain processes underlie our decisions? Prerequisite: Completion of all other Common Curriculum requirements.

ASEM 2576 - Art, Thought, Spirituality (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Raschke, Carl
CRN: 1244
Course Description

This course examines the close and complex relationship between esthetic expression and private religiosity, or "spirituality." The course will examine how theories as well as personal accounts of artistic creativity, experience and appreciation can both broaden and deepen our understanding of the inner life that is otherwise communicated in religious terms and how artistic expression can also have a quasi-religious or "spiritual" character. The central objective will be to illumine the way in which the construction of the individual self and the formation of the personal identity are intimately tied to different quests that are artistic and spiritual at once.

ASEM 2577 - Cultural Intersections (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1265
Course Description

In this course, we explore the dynamics of cultural reception or the translational dimension of modern culture, particularly the reception of narratives within particular cultures and beyond. Our main focus is the principles that integrate and divide people along the lines of race, class, ethnicity and culture. Our journey involves studies of cultural contacts, contexts and narratives from Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas.

ASEM 2579 - From Literature to Film (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1266
Course Description

In this course, we examine the adaptation of literary works into films. We closely study selected modern literary works and the film interpretations of each work. Focusing on the transition from one narrative form to another, the course enhances the critical skill of students as well as their creative ability with respect to cinematic translations. We, therefore, also have mini scriptwriting workshops as a way of imaginatively highlighting the sort of considerations that go into the making of the film script.

ASEM 2581 - Forgiveness, Politics and Film (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Wadsworth, Nancy
CRN: 1423
Course Description

This course covers a number of reconciliation frameworks that have been employed as transformative and peacemaking strategies in various interpersonal, social and political contexts. We discuss the value (and limitations) of core reconciliation concepts, see how they have been used productively, and consider their possible application to ongoing problems in the world today.

ASEM 2596 - Politics of Reconciliation (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Sun, Jing
CRN: 1544
Course Description

This class addresses the national and international efforts to seek justice and achieve reconciliation. It examines how state and non-state actors reflect on an unfortunate or hostile past with a designated "other": how did their relations and interactions with this targeted "other" go wrong? What were the material, philosophical and emotional grounds to breed such hostilities? What were the consequences? Has the memory of the "past self" and "past others" shaped the way the two groups interact today? Why do some actors refuse to say "sorry," and why do some victims refuse to forgive? What are the similarities and differences among various reconciliation projects? In this class, we lead students to explore these challenging yet exciting questions.

ASEM 2597 - Unwrapping the Rhetoric of Consumption (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Hunter, Keeley
CRN: 1138
Course Description

Unwrapping the Rhetoric of Consumption: A Critical Investigation of the Relationship between Communication, Consumption, Shopping, and Identity is a writing intensive course that offers an introduction to the study of consumption as a communicative phenomenon. People often use consumption to demonstrate who they are, their worth/importance, their relational ties, their gender, etc. The course will examine the socially positive and negative implications of these practices of consumption. Completion of all Common Curriculum requirements is required prior to registering for this class.

ASEM 2609 - Literature of Nature and Apocalypse (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Stratton, Billy
CRN: 1267
Course Description

Concern about the declining state of the environment has been a topic of longstanding interest, from Henry David Thoreau to John Muir, and writers like Edward Abbey, Ernest Callenbach, Louise Erdrich, T.C. Boyle, Octavia Burtler, Cormac McCarthy and others. This writing intensive course examines questions relating to environmental activism and social structures predicated upon technological and materialist culture. It considers how American writers have reassessed the relation between religious beliefs and notions of utopia and apocalypse. It examines and analyzes timely and relevant historical, literary, and philosophical issues relating to the current state of the environment.

ASEM 2620 - Inventing America (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Hicks, Darrin
CRN: 1139
Course Description

This class introduces students to exemplary public documents, primarily in the form of speeches, which address the promises set out in the preamble of the U.S. Declaration of Independence: the rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The course traces how these promises have been articulated by a succession of public actors ranging from U.S. Presidents to members of radical political factions. The course always addresses three major political movements: (1) the movement for political inclusion of Blacks, beginning with early abolitionists and extending to the struggle for civil rights, including the black power movement; (2) the movement for the political inclusion of women, beginning with the suffragists and extending to include feminism, including the fights over sexual freedom; and (3) the struggle over economic rights, beginning with early U.S. socialist and anarchist movements and extending into the contest over the creation and pruning of the U.S. welfare system.

ASEM 2657 - Harry Potter and Esotericism (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/018:10 am to 11:20 amWarlick, M.
CRN: 1745
Course Description

Today's students have grown up with J. K. Rowling's seven Harry Potter books. This incredible publishing phenomenon has inspired children and adults alike to devour 500-page books within days of publication, at a time when statistics seem to indicate that people are no longer reading. Why would these tales of English school children learning a curriculum of magical skills have so captured the imagination of a generation of young people living in a post-modern world? The purpose of this class then is to examine the role of esoteric themes that pervade the Harry Potter books and to investigate the history of those subjects from the Middle Ages to the present, by focusing on the visual traditions they inspired. Areas discussed include the history of magic and witchcraft, classical and Celtic mythology, alchemy, astrology, fantastic beasts, "books of secrets" and their healing potions, the mythic lore of botany, divination and various esoteric paths of enlightenment.

ASEM 2660 - Cinematic Storytelling (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Henry, Elizabeth
CRN: 1276
Course Description

The course acquaints students with basic concepts and methods used in the analysis of stories, the theoretical assumptions and models describing and justifying those concepts and models, and practical applications of story analysis in cinematic and script form. We begin with Aristotle, provide an interdisciplinary and historical overview of narratology, move to literary narrative analysis, and then focus on film-theoretical approaches while gaining practical skills in analysis of the elements of storytelling in fiction, film and television. In this way, students gain some historical perspectives on the form and function of story - its timeless prevalence as well as its more current iterations.

ASEM 2660 - Cinematic Storytelling (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Henry, Elizabeth
CRN: 1818
Course Description

The course acquaints students with basic concepts and methods used in the analysis of stories, the theoretical assumptions and models describing and justifying those concepts and models, and practical applications of story analysis in cinematic and script form. We begin with Aristotle, provide an interdisciplinary and historical overview of narratology, move to literary narrative analysis, and then focus on film-theoretical approaches while gaining practical skills in analysis of the elements of storytelling in fiction, film and television. In this way, students gain some historical perspectives on the form and function of story - its timeless prevalence as well as its more current iterations.

ASEM 2663 - The Dark Knight Exposed: Exploring the Complicatedness of Superheroes (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W06/13 - 07/0110:00 am to 1:20 pmTaczak, Kara
CRN: 1743
Course Description

The 21st century has seen a rebirth of interest in fictional superheroes, and this course will explore how such characters can be seen as representing aspects of contemporary society. Especially noteworthy are conflicts between good and evil that so many superheroes embody. As Batman character Harvey Dent explains, ?You either die a hero or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain.? The course uses readings from psychology, literary studies, and popular culture to explore figures from the X-Men, Superman, the Avengers, and other comics and movies, with a central case study focus on Batman. The goal is for students to come away with a deep understanding of and appreciation for the complexities of superheroes and what they represent: what conflicts hide below their surfaces and our society?s?

ASEM 2664 - Contemporary Issues in Africa (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
T R07/18 - 08/111:00 pm to 6:00 pmJoslin, Isaac
CRN: 1756
Course Description

Through the study of a variety of literary, visual, and oral cultural artifacts, this course will investigate contemporary issues of gender identity, education, development, and political culture in different areas of the African continent.

ASEM 2720 - Nazi Germany: History, Literature, Culture (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1302
Course Description

This course explores Germany's Nazi era. It focuses on themes like redemption, temptation, national community, conflict and memory while analyzing both texts and visuals from and related to the period. Prerequisite: Completion of all other Common Curriculum Requirements.

ASEM 2720 - Nazi Germany: History, Literature, Culture (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1304
Course Description

This course explores Germany's Nazi era. It focuses on themes like redemption, temptation, national community, conflict and memory while analyzing both texts and visuals from and related to the period. Prerequisite: Completion of all other Common Curriculum Requirements.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1206
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1759
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1928
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

ASEM 2789 - Deviant Bodies
M T W R07/18 - 08/059:20 am to 12:50 pmLevesque, Amie
CRN: 1454
Course Description

Students will explore the meanings of deviant bodies. They will examine narratives of fatness, illness, disabilities, sexualities, femininities, masculinities, race, and contamination from sociological, historical, anthropological, and feminist perspectives. Discussions and intensive writing about deviant bodies will be prompted by scholarship on embodiment, gender, and social inequality, through examinations of popular culture, social media, film, and students' own social interactions.

Anthropology (ANTH)
ANTH 3990 - Summer Field School-Archaeology
Off-Site06/09 - 07/166:00 am to 3:00 pmClark, Bonnie
CRN: 1296
Course Description

Archaeological excavation, survey and recordings; analysis and conservation of artifacts in the field.

Art - Studio (ARTS)
ARTS 1015 - Experiences in the Visual Arts
M T W R F07/11 - 07/229:00 am to 4:00 pmMacInnes, Roderick
CRN: 1279
Course Description

This course explores the language of the visual arts and how it can be used to communicate ideas about culture, history and the personal. Through hands-on exercises and experimentation in different media students create visual art works that interpret the world around them. This course focuses on different areas of the visual arts that change its focus depending on the area of expertise of the faculty teaching it. (Example: drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics, sculpture.) Students leave the course with a broader understanding of the visual arts, past and present. Students also leave with a more in-depth understanding of the creative process that will inform other areas of studies throughout the University and which will enrich their lives long into the future. Lab fee. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ARTS 1250 - Drawing (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
T R06/13 - 08/119:20 am to 12:35 pmRoss, William
CRN: 1911
Course Description

Fundamental drawing practice and history based on selected exercises, slide presentations, comprehensive group/individual critiques and workshops. Still-life and figure drawing are covered in this course. Projects focus on ways to comprehend and draw three-dimensional forms, with emphasis on conceptual issues and use of materials. This class is required of all majors in studio art prior to taking upper-level courses. It is also required of all EDP students.

ARTS 2415 - Introduction to Photography
M T W R F06/27 - 07/089:00 am to 4:00 pmMacInnes, Roderick
CRN: 1278
Course Description

This course approaches the medium of photography as a fine art. Fundamental techniques in traditional black and white photography, as well as digital photographic image making, are covered. Topics include camera operation, exposure, film developing, film and print scanning, and traditional and digital printing. Projects are viewed and discussed in group critique sessions. Students must have a camera with manual metering capabilities. Lab fee. Art majors must complete ARTS 1250 and ARTS 1300 first.

ARTS 3701 - Topics in Studio Art: Drawing, Painting & Printmaking in Venice, Italy
M T W R F06/13 - 06/30 Howard, Deborah,
Ghormley, Jennifer
CRN: 1002
Course Description

Selected topics in advanced studio art research. Course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Lab fee. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

ARTS 3701 - Topics in Studio Art: Photography in Scotland
U M T W R F S08/13 - 08/20 MacInnes, Roderick
CRN: 1001
Course Description

Selected topics in advanced studio art research. Course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Lab fee. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

ARTS 3701 - Topics in Studio Art: Photography in New York City
U M T W R F S06/05 - 06/12 MacInnes, Roderick
CRN: 1006
Course Description

Selected topics in advanced studio art research. Course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Lab fee. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Art History (ARTH)
ARTH 3701 - Topics in Art History: Tibet on Display:"Collecting/Viewing"Tibet in New York City
 05/24 - 05/24  
CRN: 1003
Course Description

Selected themes and topics from the history of art. Content changes and course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits.

Biology (BIOL)
BIOL 1220 - Molecules to Humankind I (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
T R06/13 - 07/018:00 am to 10:50 amHebel, Angela
M T W R06/13 - 07/0111:00 am to 12:50 pmHebel, Angela
CRN: 1365
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors that examines the mechanisms that sustain life. Emphasis is placed on understanding the human body at the molecular, cellular and physiological levels. In the fall quarter our discussions start with the atom and basic chemistry. We next consider the properties of complex molecules, including DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, in order to see how such molecules are used and organized by living organisms. Our discussions of large and complex molecules lead naturally to the basic unit of life, the cell. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

BIOL 1221 - Molecules to Humankind II (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
T R07/05 - 07/228:00 am to 10:50 amAndrud, Kristin
M T W R07/05 - 07/2211:00 am to 12:50 pmAndrud, Kristin
CRN: 1366
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors begins with an introduction to the general vertebrate body plan; we emphasize the human body plan but also compare it with other vertebrates. Discussions progress through the major organ and physiological systems of the body, including circulatory, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, nervous, skin, immune, reproductive, gastrointestinal, and skeletal and muscle systems. Discussions concentrate on the organization and function of these systems. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

BIOL 1222 - Molecules to Humankind III (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
T R07/25 - 08/118:00 am to 10:50 amMorris, Julie
M T W R07/25 - 08/1111:00 am to 12:50 pmMorris, Julie
CRN: 1367
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence focuses for non-majors on cell biology, genetics, and human reproduction and development. After a review of cell structure and function, focusing on how cells are capable of replication with modification, the mechanisms by which information is passed on from one cell to another and from one generation to the next are considered. The second half of the quarter concerns sexual reproduction and early development. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

BIOL 2090 - Biostatistics (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Fogleman, James
CRN: 1368
Course Description

Statistics in biological research. Computer-aided statistical analysis and hypothesis testing focusing on experiments and data unique to the biological sciences. Cross listed with BIOL 4090.

BIOL 2090 - Biostatistics (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Fogleman, James
CRN: 1369
Course Description

Statistics in biological research. Computer-aided statistical analysis and hypothesis testing focusing on experiments and data unique to the biological sciences. Cross listed with BIOL 4090.

BIOL 2120 - Cell Structure and Function (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
T W R06/13 - 07/089:00 am to 11:50 amLorenzon, Nancy
CRN: 1370
Course Description

Chemical composition of cells; structure and function of cell organelles; interrelationship of cellular unit with its environment; mechanisms of energy conversion within cells; functions of excitability, contractility and cell growth. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010, BIOL 1011 or BIOL 1220, BIOL 1221. Corequisite: BIOL 2121 lab section. CHEM 1010 prerequisite or corequisite.

BIOL 2121 - Cell Structure & Function Lab (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
T R06/13 - 07/0812:00 pm to 2:50 pmAndrud, Kristin
CRN: 1371
Course Description

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: BIOL 2120.

BIOL 2200 - Medical Terminology (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Sadler, Susan
CRN: 1372
Course Description

This course presents fundamentals and applications of medical terminology using online learning modules and assessment. This review and application of human anatomy and physiology is suitable for students who have completed introductory biology (BIOL 1010 or its equivalent) and who are working toward a career in medicine or for whom communication with health care providers is essential. Students study basic anatomy and physiology at a level that is intermediate between introductory and advanced courses, discover the medical history behind medical terminology, analyze medical case studies, and work to develop skills for clear and concise articulation of the basic concepts of anatomy and physiology behind medical diagnosis and treatment. This mastery of medical terminology helps to build a strong foundation for advanced coursework in anatomy and physiology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1010 or equivalent with instructor approval.

BIOL 3250 - Human Physiology
M T W R06/13 - 07/1510:30 am to 12:20 pmSadler, Susan,
Hebel, Angela
T R06/13 - 07/151:00 pm to 4:00 pmSadler, Susan,
Hebel, Angela
CRN: 1373
Course Description

Functional relationships of human organ systems with coordinated laboratory activities and experiments that demonstrate and test physiological principles. Lab fee associated with this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010, BIOL 1011.

Business Core (BUS)
BUS 1999 - Daniels College of Business Checkpoint 1 Assessment
M06/13 - 06/1311:00 am to 11:55 amHaag, Stephen
W06/15 - 06/1511:00 am to 11:55 amHaag, Stephen
F06/17 - 06/1711:00 am to 11:55 amHaag, Stephen
CRN: 1476
Course Description

Daniels College of Business graduation requirements include separate assessment exams to show mastery and retention of course content within the business core. The assessment should be taken immediately after completing all of the business core courses associated with Daniels Checkpoint 1. Students must pass both assessment exams before registering for MGMT 2850.

BUS 1999 - Daniels College of Business Checkpoint 1 Assessment
F06/24 - 06/241:00 pm to 1:55 pmHaag, Stephen
F07/22 - 07/221:00 pm to 1:55 pmHaag, Stephen
F08/05 - 08/051:00 pm to 1:55 pmHaag, Stephen
CRN: 1478
Course Description

Daniels College of Business graduation requirements include separate assessment exams to show mastery and retention of course content within the business core. The assessment should be taken immediately after completing all of the business core courses associated with Daniels Checkpoint 1. Students must pass both assessment exams before registering for MGMT 2850.

BUS 1999 - Daniels College of Business Checkpoint 1 Assessment
M08/08 - 08/0811:00 am to 11:55 amHaag, Stephen
W08/10 - 08/1011:00 am to 11:55 amHaag, Stephen
R08/11 - 08/1111:00 am to 11:55 amHaag, Stephen
CRN: 1480
Course Description

Daniels College of Business graduation requirements include separate assessment exams to show mastery and retention of course content within the business core. The assessment should be taken immediately after completing all of the business core courses associated with Daniels Checkpoint 1. Students must pass both assessment exams before registering for MGMT 2850.

BUS 2999 - Daniels College of Business Checkpoint 2 Assessment
M06/13 - 06/131:00 pm to 1:55 pmHaag, Stephen
W06/15 - 06/151:00 pm to 1:55 pmHaag, Stephen
F06/17 - 06/171:00 pm to 1:55 pmHaag, Stephen
CRN: 1477
Course Description

Daniels College of Business graduation requirements include separate assessment exams to show mastery and retention of course content within the business core. This assessment should be taken immediately after completing all of the business core courses associated with Daniels Checkpoint 2. Students must pass both assessment exams before registering for MGMT 2850.

BUS 2999 - Daniels College of Business Checkpoint 2 Assessment
F06/24 - 06/2411:00 am to 11:55 amHaag, Stephen
F07/22 - 07/2211:00 am to 11:55 amHaag, Stephen
F08/05 - 08/0511:00 am to 11:55 amHaag, Stephen
CRN: 1479
Course Description

Daniels College of Business graduation requirements include separate assessment exams to show mastery and retention of course content within the business core. This assessment should be taken immediately after completing all of the business core courses associated with Daniels Checkpoint 2. Students must pass both assessment exams before registering for MGMT 2850.

BUS 2999 - Daniels College of Business Checkpoint 2 Assessment
M08/08 - 08/081:00 pm to 1:55 pmHaag, Stephen
W08/10 - 08/101:00 pm to 1:55 pmHaag, Stephen
R08/11 - 08/111:00 pm to 1:55 pmHaag, Stephen
CRN: 1481
Course Description

Daniels College of Business graduation requirements include separate assessment exams to show mastery and retention of course content within the business core. This assessment should be taken immediately after completing all of the business core courses associated with Daniels Checkpoint 2. Students must pass both assessment exams before registering for MGMT 2850.

Business Ethics &Legal Studies (LGST)
LGST 2000 - Foundations of Business Law (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Ciocchetti, Corey
CRN: 1014
Course Description

Managerial perspective on the role of law and its relationship to business environment; emphasis on American legal system (history of law, courts and civil procedure), private law (business torts, contracts, corporate responsibilities and business ethics), and governmental intervention (constitutional law, employment law, white collar criminal law and corporate/securities law). Prerequisites: BUS 1000 and sophomore standing.

LGST 2000 - Foundations of Business Law (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Ciocchetti, Corey
CRN: 1015
Course Description

Managerial perspective on the role of law and its relationship to business environment; emphasis on American legal system (history of law, courts and civil procedure), private law (business torts, contracts, corporate responsibilities and business ethics), and governmental intervention (constitutional law, employment law, white collar criminal law and corporate/securities law). Prerequisites: BUS 1000 and sophomore standing.

Business Information&Analytics (INFO)
INFO 1010 - Analytics I: Data Management and Analysis (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Baltzan, Paige
CRN: 1193
Course Description

The amount of data businesses are able to maintain and process is growing exponentially, and the ability to manage that data successfully can give a business a tremendous competitive advantage. This course introduces the student to the business data landscape, as well as basic data management and analysis skills through spreadsheet and database applications. Student projects focus on data collection, data cleansing and mining, statistical and graphical analysis, basic modeling, and written presentation skills. No prerequisites.

INFO 1011 - Microsoft Office Certification I Lab (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
 06/13 - 08/11  
CRN: 1194
Course Description

Learning lab and exam with successful comletion resulting in award of formal Microsoft Office certification for Excel. BSBA/BSACC degrees only. Prerequisites:INFO 1010.

INFO 1020 - Analytics II: Business Statistics and Analysis (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Vidacovich, Courtney
CRN: 1191
Course Description

Businesses can never have perfect information; therefore, they must employ statistical techniques to improve the decision-making process. This course introduces students to the basic tenets of probability and statistics, with an emphasis on business applications. Statistical models as decision-support tools are taught. Student projects focus on data collection, data analysis, decision analysis, and written presentation skills. Prerequisites: INFO 1010, MATH 1200, or MATH 1951 and MOS Excel certification.

INFO 1020 - Analytics II: Business Statistics and Analysis (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Vidacovich, Courtney
CRN: 1834
Course Description

Businesses can never have perfect information; therefore, they must employ statistical techniques to improve the decision-making process. This course introduces students to the basic tenets of probability and statistics, with an emphasis on business applications. Statistical models as decision-support tools are taught. Student projects focus on data collection, data analysis, decision analysis, and written presentation skills. Prerequisites: INFO 1010, MATH 1200, or MATH 1951 and MOS Excel certification.

INFO 1021 - Microsoft Office Certification II Lab (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
 06/13 - 08/11  
CRN: 1192
Course Description

Learning lab and exam with successful completion resulting in award of formal Microsoft Office certification for Word and PowerPoint. BSBA/BSACC degrees only. Prerequisites: MATH 1200 or MATH 1951 and STAT 1400 or INFO 1020.

INFO 2020 - Analytics III: Business Modeling and Analysis (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Baltzan, Paige
CRN: 1195
Course Description

Businesses make decisions and improve processes using a variety of modeling and analytic techniques. This course introduces the student to the techniques of multiple regression analysis, time series analysis, optimization, and simulation for solving a variety of business problems. Applications include economic forecasting, supply chain management, and project management. Student projects focus on using spreadsheet modeling for problem solving, and emphasizes written and oral presentation techniques. Prerequisites: INFO 1020, degree checkpoint 1 and all MOS certifications.

INFO 2020 - Analytics III: Business Modeling and Analysis (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Baltzan, Paige
CRN: 1750
Course Description

Businesses make decisions and improve processes using a variety of modeling and analytic techniques. This course introduces the student to the techniques of multiple regression analysis, time series analysis, optimization, and simulation for solving a variety of business problems. Applications include economic forecasting, supply chain management, and project management. Student projects focus on using spreadsheet modeling for problem solving, and emphasizes written and oral presentation techniques. Prerequisites: INFO 1020, degree checkpoint 1 and all MOS certifications.

INFO 2020 - Analytics III: Business Modeling and Analysis (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Baltzan, Paige
CRN: 2049
Course Description

Businesses make decisions and improve processes using a variety of modeling and analytic techniques. This course introduces the student to the techniques of multiple regression analysis, time series analysis, optimization, and simulation for solving a variety of business problems. Applications include economic forecasting, supply chain management, and project management. Student projects focus on using spreadsheet modeling for problem solving, and emphasizes written and oral presentation techniques. Prerequisites: INFO 1020, degree checkpoint 1 and all MOS certifications.

INFO 3700 - Topics in Business Information & Analytics: International Business Project in Poland
Abroad06/03 - 06/12 Yates, Nathan,
Yates, Heather
CRN: 1013
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to timely analytics applications. Prerequisites: DCB checkpoint 2.

INFO 3700 - Statistical Computing (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M06/13 - 06/133:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
Online06/13 - 08/11 Keeling, Kellie
W06/15 - 06/153:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
M06/20 - 06/203:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
W07/06 - 07/063:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
M07/11 - 07/113:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
W07/13 - 07/133:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
M08/01 - 08/013:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
W08/03 - 08/033:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
M08/08 - 08/083:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
W08/10 - 08/103:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
CRN: 1953
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to timely analytics applications. Prerequisites: DCB checkpoint 2.

Chemistry (CHEM)
CHEM 1010 - General Chemistry (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R F06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 11:20 amMitchell, Deborah
CRN: 1381
Course Description

For natural science and engineering majors. Atomic and molecular structure, reactions in solution, thermochemistry and thermodynamics. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1240.

CHEM 1240 - General Chemistry Lab (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/0112:00 pm to 3:00 pmMitchell, Deborah
CRN: 1382
Course Description

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 1010. Experiments illustrate aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and thermodynamics. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1010.

CHEM 1240 - General Chemistry Lab (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/0112:00 pm to 3:00 pmMitchell, Deborah
CRN: 1383
Course Description

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 1010. Experiments illustrate aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and thermodynamics. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1010.

CHEM 2451 - Organic Chemistry I (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R F07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 11:20 am 
CRN: 1384
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisites: CHEM 1010 and CHEM 1240. Corequisite: CHEM 2461.

CHEM 2452 - Organic Chemistry II (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R F07/25 - 08/119:20 am to 11:20 amCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1385
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: CHEM 2451. Corequisite: CHEM 2462.

CHEM 2453 - Organic Chemistry III (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R F06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 11:20 amMurugaverl, Balasingam
CRN: 1386
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. Prerequisite: CHEM 2452. Corequisite: CHEM 2463.

CHEM 2461 - Organic Chemistry Lab I (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/2212:00 pm to 3:30 pm 
CRN: 1387
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 2451.

CHEM 2462 - Organic Chemistry Lab II (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/1112:00 pm to 3:30 pmCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1388
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 2452.

CHEM 2463 - Organic Chemistry Lab III (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/0112:00 pm to 3:30 pmMurugaverl, Balasingam
CRN: 1389
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2453.

CHEM 2463 - Organic Chemistry Lab III (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/0112:00 pm to 3:30 pmMurugaverl, Balasingam
CRN: 1390
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2453.

CHEM 3811 - Biochemistry-Proteins (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R F06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 11:20 amWells, Todd
CRN: 1391
Course Description

Protein structure and function, starting with the building blocks and forces that drive the formation of protein structure and the basic concepts of protein structure, and continuing with enzyme catalysis, kinetics, and regulation. Prerequisites: CHEM 2453 and CHEM 2011, or instructor permission.

Communication (COMN)
COMN 1210 - Foundations of Communication Studies (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Foust, Christina
CRN: 1130
Course Description

This course offers students an introduction to the study of communication. Students will explore the role of communication in domains that cut across the spectrum of human social life, from communication among individuals, to relationships, to marriage and families, to groups, to organizations, to communication at societal and global levels. In addition to focusing on the specific nature of communication in these distinct settings, students learn as well the different conceptual models for describing and understanding communication across these settings. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2030 - Social Movement Rhetoric (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Hunter, Keeley
CRN: 1131
Course Description

This course explores the principle agency that less powerful groups have used for social change in recent U.S. history--the rhetoric of social movement. More specifically, we consider in concrete detail and theoretical nuance the capacity of ordinary people to persuade others, voice grievances, and thus challenge broader society. Our explorations focus primarily on the rhetoric of dissident (non-majority, non-State, often un-institutionalized and non-normative) voice in our culture--both on the "right" and the "left"-- as they have sought, and continue to seek, social change. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2210 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1132
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: What is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, we explore how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities "from the ground up." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with GWST 2212.

COMN 2210 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1133
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: What is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, we explore how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities "from the ground up." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with GWST 2212.

COMN 2220 - Race and Popular Culture (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Calafell, Bernadette
CRN: 1135
Course Description

This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2220 - Race and Popular Culture (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Calafell, Bernadette
CRN: 1136
Course Description

This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2400 - Landmarks in Rhetorical Theory (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Hicks, Darrin
CRN: 1137
Course Description

This course is a survey of some of the major conceptual innovations in the history of rhetorical theory. In particular we will investigate the conceptions of rhetoric prevalent in antiquity and how they inform contemporary perspectives on rhetoric. In order to carry this off, we will conceptualize rhetoric as an attempt to answer the following questions: what is the relationship between what is true and what is the good. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 3280 - Family Communication
T06/13 - 08/116:00 pm to 9:50 pmJackson, Noell
CRN: 1838
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to enhance understanding about communication patterns within families. In this course, we will examine theory/research on the role of communication in creating and maintaining healthy marriages and families. Specifically, we will study communication and the family life cycle, different family forms, family race/ethnicity, power in families, conflict in families, communication and stress in families, and communication in the aging family. The course format includes lectures, discussions, analysis of case studies, and in class applications.

Computer Science (COMP)
COMP 1101 - Analytical Inquiry I (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Jones, Benjamin
CRN: 1775
Course Description

Students explore the use of mathematics and computer programming in creating animations. Students create animations on their laptop computers using animation software. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

COMP 2001 - Bridge Course I: Computer Science Theory Basics (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Mitchell, William
CRN: 1780
Course Description

This accelerated course covers the basics of discrete mathematics including functions, relations, counting, logic, proofs etc that is necessary to attend CS graduate school. In additon, it includes an introduction to programming and algorithm analysis.

COMP 2002 - Bridge Course II: Computer Science Theory Advanced (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
 07/18 - 08/11 Mitchell, William
CRN: 1782
Course Description

This accelerated course continues to build on the basics of discrete mathematics by covering material including advanced counting, recurrences, graphs, trees, traversals, automata etc that is necessary to attend Computer Science graduate school. In addition, it includes an introduction to additional algorithms and data structures. Prerequisite: COMP 2001.

COMP 2003 - Bridge Course III: Computer Science Systems Basics (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08  
CRN: 1781
Course Description

This accelerated course covers the basics of computer systems including assembly language programming, addressing modes, logic design etc necessary to attend CS graduate school. In additon, it includes an introduction to C programming language. In particular, standard I/O, data manipulation, pointers, and dynamic memory management.

COMP 2004 - Bridge Course IV: Computer Science Systems Advanced (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
 07/18 - 08/11  
CRN: 1783
Course Description

This accelerated course continues to build on the basics of computer systems by covering material including UNIX tools, version control, process creation, concurrent programming etc that is necessary to attend Computer Science graduate school. In addition, it includes an introduction to a scripting language. Prerequisite: COMP 2003

COMP 2355 - Intro to Systems Programming (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 AlBow, Mohammed
CRN: 1779
Course Description

The prerequisites for this class are a good understanding of imperative and object-oriented programming in Java. The prerequisites for this class include a good understanding of basic programming constructs, such as branches (if, switch), loops (for, while, do), exceptions (throw, catch), functions, objects, classes, packages, primitive types (int, float, boolean), arrays, arithmetic expressions and boolean operations. Computer organization is a parallel prerequisite; if possible, students should register for both this course and COMP 2691. You must have a good understanding of basic data structures such as arrays, lists, sets, trees, graphs and hash-tables. This is a class on systems programming with focus on the C programming language and UNIX APIs. There will be programming assignments designed to make you use various Debian GNU/Linux system APIs. Programming assignments involve writing code in C or C++. Prerequisite: COMP 2673.

COMP 3410 - World Wide Web Programming (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Liszewski, Erica
CRN: 1776
Course Description

Creating WWW pages with HTML, accessing user-written programs via CGI scripts, creating forms, imagemaps and tables, and Java programming principles and techniques. Prerequisite: COMP 2355.

COMP 3705 - Tpcs: iOS Programming (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
T R06/13 - 08/112:00 pm to 3:50 pmThurimella, Ramakrishna
CRN: 1778
Construction Management (CMGT)
CMGT 3190 - Residential Development (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
T R06/13 - 08/113:20 pm to 5:25 pmHolt, Eric
CRN: 1068
Course Description

A course sequence designed to emphasize the practical application of the theories and concepts of residential development. The course provides a capstone experience for seniors. Students are expected to apply their knowledge of general business, real estate and construction management practices by forming a student business entity, acquiring land, building and selling a residential property in a case format. Students will apply accounting, finance, marketing, real estate and construction management techniques in the planning for a residential development. The application of green building materials and methods is emphasized. Cross listed with CMGT 4490. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2.

CMGT 3700 - Design Build Delivery
F06/17 - 06/178:30 am to 4:30 pmJackson, Barbara
S06/18 - 06/188:30 am to 4:30 pmJackson, Barbara
F07/08 - 07/088:30 am to 4:30 pmJackson, Barbara
S07/09 - 07/098:30 am to 4:30 pmJackson, Barbara
F07/29 - 07/298:30 am to 4:30 pmJackson, Barbara
CRN: 1066
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to construction management. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2.

CMGT 3700 - CityCrafting - Integrated Systems-Scale Regeneration of the City
F06/24 - 06/248:00 am to 5:00 pmKnott Jr., John
S06/25 - 06/258:00 am to 5:00 pmKnott Jr., John
F07/29 - 07/298:00 am to 5:00 pmKnott Jr., John
S07/30 - 07/308:00 am to 5:00 pmKnott Jr., John
F08/05 - 08/058:00 am to 5:00 pmKnott Jr., John
CRN: 1737
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to construction management. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2.

Economics (ECON)
ECON 1020 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics I: History and Theories (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Cole, Paula
CRN: 1292
Course Description

This course presents an introductory analysis of how the economic aspects of our society operate. We begin with a brief examination of the development of human economic arrangements and how these developed into the kind of economy we have today. We then look at some of the historical development of how people thought that economic activity works and how they thought it should work. Then we go into an examination of the workings of markets and economic competition--what we call micro-economics--by examining some of the relevant theory as well as its embodiment in developments in the U.S. economy. Following that, we examine in much more detail the theory and some current issues involved in what we call macro-economics--the study of the workings of the national economy as a whole, with its concerns to explain such matters as the national rates of unemployment and price inflation, along with a study of the monetary and financial aspects of the economy and the promises and problems of gender from many different directions. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ECON 1020 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics I: History and Theories (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Zuchegno, Daniel
CRN: 1297
Course Description

This course presents an introductory analysis of how the economic aspects of our society operate. We begin with a brief examination of the development of human economic arrangements and how these developed into the kind of economy we have today. We then look at some of the historical development of how people thought that economic activity works and how they thought it should work. Then we go into an examination of the workings of markets and economic competition--what we call micro-economics--by examining some of the relevant theory as well as its embodiment in developments in the U.S. economy. Following that, we examine in much more detail the theory and some current issues involved in what we call macro-economics--the study of the workings of the national economy as a whole, with its concerns to explain such matters as the national rates of unemployment and price inflation, along with a study of the monetary and financial aspects of the economy and the promises and problems of gender from many different directions. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ECON 1030 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics II: Theories and Policies (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Cole, Paula
CRN: 1293
Course Description

Examination of how markets work and the process of competition; public policy toward markets; antitrust, regulation, deregulation, public enterprise vs. privatization, etc.; distribution of income, labor-management and management-ownership-finance relations; impact of macroeconomic and international issues and policies on business, labor and consumers. Prerequisite: ECON 1020.

ECON 1030 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics II: Theories and Policies (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amZuchegno, Daniel
CRN: 1754
Course Description

Examination of how markets work and the process of competition; public policy toward markets; antitrust, regulation, deregulation, public enterprise vs. privatization, etc.; distribution of income, labor-management and management-ownership-finance relations; impact of macroeconomic and international issues and policies on business, labor and consumers. Prerequisite: ECON 1020.

ECON 2020 - Intermediate Microeconomics (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/081:00 pm to 3:30 pmZuchegno, Daniel
CRN: 1755
Course Description

Microeconomic foundations to determine prices and production; consumer behavior, the behavior of firms in competitive and imperfectly competitive markets, and factor markets. Prerequisite: ECON 1030.

ECON 2050 - History of Economic Thought (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
M T W R07/18 - 08/118:10 am to 10:40 amUrquhart, Robert
CRN: 1294
Course Description

Development of economic thought; leading writers and schools, their influence and theories. Prerequisite: ECON 1030.

ECON 2410 - Industrial Organization Economics (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Yasar, Yavuz
CRN: 1295
Course Description

This course explores some applied topics in microeconomic theory such as innovation and technological change; cost of production and decision making by firms; market structures and competition; labor market; the changing role of the state; antitrust; regulation and deregulation; and international trade. Prerequisite: ECON 1030.

ECON 2670 - Quantitative Methods (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/081:00 pm to 3:30 pmEvers, Mark
CRN: 1326
Course Description

This course offers an introduction to empirical work and statistics relevant to the study of economics. The course begins with a discussion of the use and creation of data, and various sources of data. It then presents the basic foundations of statistical methods for the description and analysis of data. Students learn how to calculate common descriptive statistics, test hypotheses related to the mean and differences between means, and how to perform and interpret bivariate linear regression analysis. In the process, students learn and use a popular software package commonly used for statistical analysis in economics. Prerequisite: ECON 1030.

Engineering (ENGR)
ENGR 3510 - Renewable and Efficient Power and Energy Systems
T W R07/11 - 08/191:00 pm to 3:00 pmGao, Wenzhong
CRN: 1492
Course Description

This course introduces the current and future sustainable electrical power systems. Fundamentals of renewable energy sources and storage systems are discussed. Interfaces of the new sources to the utility grid are covered. Prerequisite: ENEE 2021.

ENGR 3520 - Introduction to Power Electronics
M W F07/11 - 08/199:00 am to 11:00 amMatin, Mohammad
CRN: 1473
Course Description

This covers fundamentals of power electronics. We discuss various switching converters topologies. Basic knowledge of Efficiency and small-signal modeling for the DC-DC switching converters is covered. Furthermore, magnetic and filter design are introduced. Prerequisites: ENEE 2211 and ENGR 3722.

English (ENGL)
ENGL 1110 - Literary Inquiry (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Stratton, Billy
CRN: 1330
Course Description

Literary Inquiry introduces students to the variety of ways that poetry, fiction, and/or drama expand our understanding of what it means to be human. Topics vary to engage students in the rewarding process of interpreting the literary art form as a unique cultural expression. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2130 - World Literature (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1261
Course Description

A literary journey around the world, the focus of this course includes the study of modern literature from different parts of the world--such as Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Textual analysis as well as cultural and transnational contexts are emphasized. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2708 - Topics in English: Science Fiction Film and Literature
M T W R F08/22 - 08/2610:00 am to 4:00 pmStratton, Billy,
Quinney, Charlotte
CRN: 1009
ENGL 2710 - American Novel-19th & 20th Century (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Davis, Clark
CRN: 1262
Course Description

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2712 - American Short Story (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Davis, Clark
CRN: 1263
Course Description

Wide range of American short stories, quintessential American genre, from the early 19th century to present.

Finance (FIN)
FIN 2800 - Financial Decision Making (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
T R06/13 - 08/1110:30 am to 12:40 pmCox, David
CRN: 1207
Course Description

Basic financial principles and analytical skills including ratio analysis, breakeven analysis and leverage, net present value, internal rate of return, and standard forecasting techniques. Prerequisites: ACTG 2200 and degree checkpoint 1.

FIN 3300 - Investments (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M W06/13 - 08/111:00 pm to 3:10 pmDutra, Vaneesha
CRN: 1208
Course Description

Survey of marketable securities, markets, regulation, and risk and return measurement with introduction to fundamental and technical analysis. Prerequisites: FIN 2800 and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3310 - Analysis of Securities (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M W06/13 - 08/113:20 pm to 5:25 pmSherbo, Andrew
CRN: 1209
Course Description

Analysis, valuation and selection of equity securities. Prerequisites: FIN 3300 and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3410 - Multinational Financial Management (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M W06/13 - 08/1110:30 am to 12:40 pmLeung, Chi Hung
CRN: 1211
Course Description

Survey and analysis of financial management within and among multinational corporations; Eurodollars, Euromarkets and foreign currencies. Prerequisites: FIN 2800 and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3500 - Financial Modeling (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
T R06/13 - 08/111:00 pm to 3:10 pmCook, Thomas
CRN: 1212
Course Description

Use of Excel functions and macros to construct financial models from corporate finance, investments and financial markets. Prerequisites: FIN 3200, FIN 3300 and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3700 - Investment Banking in New York
R07/14 - 07/145:30 pm to 7:40 pmClouse, Maclyn
T07/26 - 07/265:30 pm to 7:40 pmClouse, Maclyn
T08/09 - 08/095:30 pm to 7:40 pmClouse, Maclyn
R08/11 - 08/115:30 pm to 7:40 pmClouse, Maclyn
 08/15 - 08/19 Clouse, Maclyn
CRN: 1470
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to finance. Prerequisites: instructor's permission and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3700 - Investment Banking (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M W06/13 - 08/117:50 pm to 10:00 pmClouse, Maclyn
CRN: 1471
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to finance. Prerequisites: instructor's permission and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3710 - Reiman Fund I (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/116:00 pm to 8:30 pmHughen, John
CRN: 1214
Course Description

This course is a practical portfolio management class designed to cover the major areas of the investment management lifecycle. This course focuses heavily on learning and using leading industry data and analytical tools to support the investment decision-making process in a live portfolio environment. The class recommendations and decisions are implemented in the Reiman Fund portfolio. This is an elective course that is the first in the series of classes involving the Reiman Fund portfolio. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2 and instructor's permission.

FIN 3720 - Reiman Fund II (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/116:00 pm to 8:30 pmHughen, John
CRN: 1215
Course Description

This course is a practical portfolio management class designed to cover the major areas of the investment management lifecycle. This course focuses heavily on learning and using leading industry data and analytical tools to support the investment decision-making process in a live portfolio environment. The class recommendations and decisions are implemented in the Reiman Fund portfolio. This is an elective course that is the second in the series of classes involving the Reiman Fund portfolio. Preequisite: FIN 3710.

FIN 3730 - Reiman Fund III (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/116:00 pm to 8:30 pmHughen, John
CRN: 1216
Course Description

This course is a practical portfolio management class designed to cover the major areas of the investment management lifecycle. This course focuses heavily on learning and using leading industry data and analytical tools to support the investment decision-making process in a live portfolio environment. The class recommendations and decisions are implemented in the Reiman Fund portfolio. This is an elective course that is the third in the series of classes involving the Reiman Fund portfolio. Prerequisite: FIN 3720.

First-Year Seminar (FSEM)
FSEM 1110 - First Year Seminar: Enhancing Speaking Skills for International Students (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/082:30 pm to 4:50 pmKirkpatrick, Cheyne
CRN: 1496
Course Description

This course introduces undergraduate first-year international students to academic culture. In addition, the course introduces some aspects of American cultural ideals and values as they pertain to academic life. Many first-year undergraduate students face challenges with course work, balancing academic and campus life. The demands can be much more intense for first-year undergraduate international students, who navigate all the same issues while in a foreign culture. The instructors in these courses are sensitive to the demands placed on international students, and serve as formal advisors to the students in this course. In this class, students are challenged to participate as members of an intellectual community. The course work is designed to improve critical thinking skills and logical reasoning through impromptu and prepared discussion as well as classroom presentations. Students are expected to read articles and watch video outside class, refer to assigned texts during class discussion, synthesize ideas from course materials, and state and support their personal ideas regarding course topics. Must be a first-year international student to enroll in this course.

French (FREN)
FREN 1001 - Francais elementaire (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:40 pmWoellner, Terri-Jo
CRN: 1298
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on oral skills; introduction to French and Francophone cultures. First quarter in a three quarter sequence.

FREN 1002 - Francais elementaire (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 12:40 pmGrall-Johnson, Helene
CRN: 1299
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on oral skills; introduction to French and Francophone cultures. Second quarter in a three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or equivalent.

FREN 1003 - Francais elementaire (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/119:20 am to 12:40 pmMargolin, Arianne
CRN: 1300
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on oral skills; introduction to French and Francophone cultures. Third quarter in a three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or equivalent.

Gender and Women's Studies (GWST)
GWST 1112 - Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Feitz, Lindsey
CRN: 1282
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of gender and women's studies. All cultures engage in a complex process of assigning cultural values and social roles which vary according to the cultural environment in which human interaction occurs. Among these, the process of translating biological differences into a complex system of gender remains one of the most important. Gender and women's studies aims to understand how this process of 'gendering' occurs, and its larger effects in society. This course also explores how this system of meaning relates to other systems of allocating power, including socioeconomic class, social status, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and nationality. Using this lens, this course explores contemporary social developments and problems. Gender and women's studies is about studying, but it is also about meaningful engagement with the world. This class presents students with a variety of types of texts from sociological articles to literary fictions and documentary and fictional cinema to explore gender from many different directions. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GWST 1112 - Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Feitz, Lindsey
CRN: 1284
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of gender and women's studies. All cultures engage in a complex process of assigning cultural values and social roles which vary according to the cultural environment in which human interaction occurs. Among these, the process of translating biological differences into a complex system of gender remains one of the most important. Gender and women's studies aims to understand how this process of 'gendering' occurs, and its larger effects in society. This course also explores how this system of meaning relates to other systems of allocating power, including socioeconomic class, social status, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and nationality. Using this lens, this course explores contemporary social developments and problems. Gender and women's studies is about studying, but it is also about meaningful engagement with the world. This class presents students with a variety of types of texts from sociological articles to literary fictions and documentary and fictional cinema to explore gender from many different directions. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GWST 2215 - Selling Sex, Gender and the American Dream: 1950 - Present (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Feitz, Lindsey
CRN: 1283
Course Description

This introductory course analyzes how commercial culture has evolved into the defining cornerstone of American life over the last sixty years. The first half of the quarter well will examine the key historical movements including the Cold War, the Civil Rights/Women's and Gay Liberation movements and investigate how women, ethnic minorities, and members of the LGBTQ community evolved into important "consumer citizens" in the United States. The second half of the quarter will examine these same social groups from a contemporary perspective, and the degree that globalization, "multiculturalism" and "going green" have emerged as dominant tropes in contemporary culture. By moving from past to present, students will gain an understanding of the complex connections between consumption and U.S. nation-building, as well as the consequences "shopping" and the accumulation of "stuff" has had in both the shaping and reconfiguring understandings of what it means to live the "American Dream." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GWST 2700 - Tpcs: Women in Science
T06/13 - 08/116:00 pm to 9:50 pmSmith, Linda
CRN: 1841
Course Description

Current issues or gender and women's studies faculty research interests.

Geography (GEOG)
GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/018:10 am to 10:20 amTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1332
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
T W R06/13 - 07/0110:30 am to 12:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1333
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
T W R06/13 - 07/0110:30 am to 12:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1334
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Keables, Michael
CRN: 1335
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
T W R06/13 - 07/0112:30 pm to 2:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1971
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/228:10 am to 10:20 amKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1336
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
T W R07/05 - 07/2210:30 am to 12:20 pmKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1337
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
T W R07/05 - 07/2210:30 am to 12:20 pmKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1338
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/118:10 am to 10:20 amKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1339
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201 and GEOG 1203.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
T W R07/25 - 08/1110:30 am to 12:20 pmKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1340
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201 and GEOG 1203.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
T W R07/25 - 08/1110:30 am to 12:20 pmKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1341
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201 and GEOG 1203.

GEOG 1410 - People, Places & Landscapes (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/111:00 pm to 4:20 pmTaylor, Matthew
CRN: 1342
Course Description

In this course, students will study the location of people and activities across the surface of the Earth. Describing the locations and patterns of human activity only lays the foundation for exploring how and why such patterns have developed historically, and how they relate to the natural environment and other aspects of human behavior. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GEOG 2100 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Hick, Steven
CRN: 1346
Course Description

Overview of GIS, including background, development, trends, and prospects in this technological field; software package and hands-on exercises used to examine basic geographic concepts and spatial data characteristics associated with automated mapping, projections, scales, geocoding, coordinate referencing, and data structures for computerized land-based data bases. Cross listed with GEOG 3100.

GEOG 2500 - Sustainability & Human Society
M T W R06/13 - 07/152:10 pm to 4:10 pmMinn, Michael
CRN: 1343
Course Description

Sustainability has become a catch phrase in discussions concerning the long-term viability of a number of phenomena, from the environment to the economy. Sustainability is commonly defined as meeting the needs of the current generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Students are introduced to issues inherent in discussions of sustainability. The major areas of focus include definitions of ecological and environmental sustainability, economic and political sustainability, and social justice, and various metrics used to assess sustainable behavior and practices. Students study the theory, principles and practices of sustainability, and participate in discussion and writing exercises based on lecture and readings.

GEOG 3000 - Advanced Geographic Statistics (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11  
CRN: 1344
Course Description

The second in a sequence of two courses that address general statistical applications particular to geography, environmental science and other disciplines dealing with a spatial dimension in the data they work with. The focus of this second course is on the more advanced multivariate statistical techniques. The course has a strong applied orientation as particular attention is given to which technique is the most appropriate to use for a given type of problem and how to interpret and apply the resulting statistics. Extensive use is made of computer statistics packages. Homework exercises involving such statistical techniques as multiple correlation and regression analysis, principle components analysis, discriminate analysis and canonical correlation. Prerequisite: GEOG 2000.

GEOG 3140 - GIS Database Design (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11  
CRN: 1345
Course Description

Designing databases to provide a foundation for GIS functions and applications, including investigating techniques used for designing databases in non-spatial environments and learning the applicability to GIS problems. Building on concepts and techniques introduced in the first half to extend traditional techniques and methodologies to model the requirements of spatial problems. Students learn to translate the conceptual spatial model into a physical implementation specific to GIS products. Prerequisite: GEOG 2100 or GEOG 3100.

GEOG 3750 - Topics in Human-Environmental Interactions: Geographies of South Africa
U M T W R F S06/06 - 06/22 Lavanchy, Gary
CRN: 1011
Course Description

This course investigates various aspects of the relationships between human societies and the natural environment.

GEOG 3750 - Topics in Geography: Health & Environment Through the Ages in England
U M T W R F S06/05 - 06/12 Hazen, Helen,
Hamann, Hillary
Abroad06/05 - 06/12 Hazen, Helen,
Hamann, Hillary
CRN: 1012
Course Description

This course investigates various aspects of the relationships between human societies and the natural environment.

GEOG 3940 - Geography Seminar: Urban Geographies of New York City
U M T W R F08/21 - 08/26 Boschmann, Eric
CRN: 1005
Course Description

International comparison of economic and social, positive and negative aspects of urban systems.

German (GERM)
GERM 1416 - German Civilization: History, Politics, and Culture (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1303
Course Description

This course is an introduction to intellectual and cultural currents in German civilization from the Enlightenment to the present, emphasizing the arts in the context of history and philosophy from the late 18th century to around the mid-20th century. Readings include excerpts from such thinkers as Kant, Fichte, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, as well as poetry and short fictional works by Heine, Junger, Remarque, Borchert, and others. The readings are supplemented by films that students are expected to have watched at the beginning of each week. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Greek (GREK)
GREK 1416 - Myths of Greece & Rome (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amCastellani, Victor
CRN: 1301
Course Description

Introduction to the goddesses and gods, heroes and heroines, and not a few monstrosities from popular tradition, literature, and visual arts of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Activities include imaginative and creative assignments. No prerequisite. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

History (HIST)
HIST 1350 - History of the British Empire (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/011:00 pm to 4:40 pmKreider, Jodie
CRN: 1260
Course Description

This course explores the rise and fall of the British Empire from its origins during the English conquests of Wales, Scotland and Ireland; explorations of the world, through commercial expansion under the British East India Company; the rise of Britain as the preeminent world imperial power during the 19th century and its eventual decline and legacy during the late 20th century. Using a variety of secondary articles, primary sources, films and monographs, this course analyzes highly debated issues including the interconnected nature of British society and developments out in the Empire, both cultural and political; the important role that women, gender, and racial ideologies placed in British dominance of one quarter of the globe; how the empire and representations of Empire changed over the century; and finally, the impact of that empire upon issues of identity and population in a post-colonial Britain. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1610 - The History of the Crusades: 1095-1300 (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Sciarcon, Jonathan
CRN: 1259
Course Description

This course traces the origins and development of the Crusading movement as well as its impact on Christian, Muslim, and Jewish society in Europe and the Middle East from the 11th through the 14th centuries C.E. This course also examines ideas of Christian/Muslim/Jewish difference in this period. We pay special attention to primary source material. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism Mgt (HRTM)
HRTM 1200 - Industry Work Experience (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
 06/13 - 08/11 Corsun, David
CRN: 1227
Course Description

Faculty supervised work experience. Prerequisites: HRTM 1100 and completion of 500 hours of approved work experience.

HRTM 3000 - Wines of the World
M T W R06/27 - 07/222:00 pm to 4:30 pm 
CRN: 1229
Course Description

A survey course of the wines of the world, including old and new world wines; still, sparkling, dessert and fortified wines; viticulture and viniculture. Prerequisite: must be at least 21 years of age. Non-majors only.

International Studies (INTS)
INTS 1500 - Contemporary Issues in the Global Economy (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Archer, Kevin
CRN: 1482
Course Description

Introduction to a range of pressing problems and debates in today's global economy, such as global economy, global markets and the global commons. Students will have a good understanding of the policy challenges posed by global economic integration and theoretical frameworks for understanding the functioning of the global economy.

INTS 1700 - Introduction to International Politics (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Archer, Kevin
CRN: 1484
Course Description

Central concepts and major theories to assist in organizing an understanding of international politics including balance of power, international organizations, foreign policy decision making, and conflict theory; application of current topics.

INTS 2468 - Resolving Conflict by Negotiation (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/011:00 pm to 4:20 pmFeste, Karen
CRN: 2055
Course Description

Social conflict is a national and global issue often expressed in violent ways culminating in shootings, civil war, and international terrorism. It is easier to escalate conflict than diffuse it, and easier to fight rather than negotiate, situations that often lead to frustration and insecurity for disputants. This course examines approaches and mechanisms of conflict resolution within the context of personal, cultural, and political barriers to understand why parties continue to fight or manage to solve their differences through settlement and reconciliation, and teaches techniques of conflict resolution, essential skills for progress and prosperity in the modern world.

INTS 2470 - Crime & International Politics (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Archer, Kevin
CRN: 1489
Course Description

What constitutes a crime in one location may constitute a personal right, a survival strategy or legitimate business opportunity in another. So how then does one address criminality in a global society? This course explores the roots of transnational crime and both domestic and international response to criminal networks. Topics include corruption, the drug trade, and human trafficking.

INTS 2704 - Tpc: Culture & Iden in Politic (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Nowakowski, Arianna
CRN: 1483
INTS 2715 - Introduction to Comparative Politics (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Abdrabou, Ahmed
CRN: 1487
Course Description

This course offers an introduction to the comparative study of political systems throughout the world. In the years following World War II, social scientists traveled extensively to newly decolonized regions of the world to examine societies there. Many found conditions so distinct from those of the western world that they warranted new models of political development. The distinguishing of development patterns in remote regions from those of western nations became the origin of modern comparative politics. The course considers both the impact of internal and external variables on political development. Internal or "domestic" variables include ideology, geography, economics and culture, while external variables include "globalization" and international conflict. Class includes understanding and critique of models of political development including classical liberal, authoritarian, communist, post-communist, "late" development, and social democratic models. It also includes discussion of possible new models in light of globalization and other factors.

INTS 3701 - Topics: Comparative Politics of the Middle East (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Abdrabou, Ahmed
CRN: 1485
Course Description

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3703 - Topics: Gender & Global Health (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Persky, Leah
CRN: 1490
Course Description

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

Japanese (JAPN)
JAPN 1001 - Elementary Japanese (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:40 pmXu, Jun
CRN: 1310
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Japanese culture. First quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 1002 - Elementary Japanese (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 12:40 pmXu, Jun
CRN: 1311
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Japanese culture. Second quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 1003 - Elementary Japanese (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/119:20 am to 12:40 pmXu, Jun
CRN: 1312
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Japanese culture. Third quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 1216 - Popular Culture of Japan (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Shaughnessy, Orna
CRN: 1313
Course Description

In this course we examine and analyze the emergence of particular forms of mass-produced culture, or culture for mass consumption, in Japan from the early modern period to the present. Using a variety of cultural materials enjoyed from the early modern period (1600-1868,) during which Japanese society underwent extensive urbanization, secularization, and cultural commodification, through to the present, the course focuses on overarching themes: media and information technology (woodblock printing, newspapers, and the internet); entertainment and gender (the all-male kabuki theatre and all-female Takarazuka revue); commodified romance; fiction (illustrated fiction, manga, and novels); anime and television fandom; healer-bots and cyborgs. No knowledge of Japanese required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1216 - Popular Culture of Japan (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Shaughnessy, Orna
CRN: 1329
Course Description

In this course we examine and analyze the emergence of particular forms of mass-produced culture, or culture for mass consumption, in Japan from the early modern period to the present. Using a variety of cultural materials enjoyed from the early modern period (1600-1868,) during which Japanese society underwent extensive urbanization, secularization, and cultural commodification, through to the present, the course focuses on overarching themes: media and information technology (woodblock printing, newspapers, and the internet); entertainment and gender (the all-male kabuki theatre and all-female Takarazuka revue); commodified romance; fiction (illustrated fiction, manga, and novels); anime and television fandom; healer-bots and cyborgs. No knowledge of Japanese required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Judaic Studies (JUST)
JUST 1610 - The History of the Crusades: 1095-1300 (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Sciarcon, Jonathan
CRN: 1290
Course Description

This course traces the origins and development of the Crusading movement as well as its impact on Christian, Muslim, and Jewish society in Europe and the Middle East from the 11th through the 14th centuries C.E. This course also examines ideas of Christian/Muslim/Jewish difference in this period. We pay special attention to primary source material. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with HIST 1610.

JUST 2202 - New Testament (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Robbins, Gregory
CRN: 1291
Course Description

This course takes a multifaceted approach (historical, literary, and critical) to the writings that comprise the Christian New Testament. The New Testament are read as a collection of primary documents that chronicle the primitive Church's slow and often painful process of self-definition. In these writings it is possible to discern the tension that arose because of the strong religious and cultural ties early Christianity maintained with Palestinian Judaism, from which it emerged as a sectarian or reform movement. The careful reader also finds evidence of the new religion's encounter with the Greco-Roman world from whose variegated ethos and culture it borrowed considerably on the way to becoming an important religious force in the first century. In exploring the New Testament, then, we attempt to recover something of the sense of what it meant to be a Christian in New Testament times. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2202.

Leadership (LDRS)
LDRS 2310 - Leadership in a Virtual World
Online06/13 - 07/20 Kosempel, Paul
CRN: 1751
Course Description

Distributed organizations are commonplace in the high-tech world in which we now find ourselves living and working. Leading in private and public settings requires a developed set of skills to utilize the virtual environment to advance a shared goal. Technical skills and communication take on new importance for leading virtually. This course focuses on these new realities of today's work and community environments. Through readings of current research on virtual work and team leadership as well as online assignments to recognize, practice and develop needed skills, students gain a strong foundational understanding of what constitutes effectiveness in virtual work and community leadership.

Management (MGMT)
MGMT 3700 - Stress Management
U W R F S06/08 - 06/12 Sampson, Nancy,
McNab, Diana
CRN: 1009
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to management. Prerequisites: Degree checkpoint 2 and MGMT 2100.

MGMT 3700 - Topics in Management: Stress Management
U W R F S08/17 - 08/21 Sampson, Nancy,
McNab, Diana
CRN: 1002
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to management. Prerequisites: Degree checkpoint 2 and MGMT 2100.

MGMT 3700 - Topics in Management: Small Business Start Up and Management
M T W R F06/06 - 06/109:00 am to 4:00 pmSafiulla, Zaid
CRN: 1022
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to management. Prerequisites: Degree checkpoint 2 and MGMT 2100.

MGMT 3700 - Global Social Entrepreneurship (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 06/135:30 pm to 7:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/13 - 08/11 Narapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/20 - 06/205:30 pm to 7:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online07/11 - 07/115:30 pm to 7:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online07/18 - 07/185:30 pm to 7:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online08/01 - 08/015:30 pm to 7:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
CRN: 1746
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to management. Prerequisites: Degree checkpoint 2 and MGMT 2100.

MGMT 3800 - Business Policy and Strategy (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Narapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/16 - 06/1610:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/23 - 06/2310:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/30 - 06/3010:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online07/07 - 07/0710:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online07/14 - 07/1410:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online07/21 - 07/2110:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
CRN: 1056
Course Description

This course examines the roles and responsibilities of top managers in developing, implementing, and managing an effective organization-wide strategy. Students learn new perspectives and concepts as well as integrate learning from previous course work to solve complex and challenging business problems. Prerequisites: senior standing, MGMT 2850, and DCB checkpoint 2.

MGMT 3800 - Business Policy and Strategy (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/14 - 06/1410:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/21 - 06/2110:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/28 - 06/2810:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online07/05 - 07/0510:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online07/12 - 07/1210:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online07/19 - 07/1910:30 am to 12:40 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
CRN: 1943
Course Description

This course examines the roles and responsibilities of top managers in developing, implementing, and managing an effective organization-wide strategy. Students learn new perspectives and concepts as well as integrate learning from previous course work to solve complex and challenging business problems. Prerequisites: senior standing, MGMT 2850, and DCB checkpoint 2.

Marketing (MKTG)
MKTG 2800 - Introduction to Marketing (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Quinlan-Wilder, Tia
CRN: 1134
Course Description

Marketing is, at its core, the interface a company has with its customers, and what could be more important in business? This introductory course is a must for any business professional, and anyone seeking to be a savvy consumer or to learn about promoting oneself. It is a challenging, hands-on course with an integrated approach to learning the basic fundamentals of the subject. It develops a student?s ability to make sound planning decisions using real information from the external environment to determine market feasibility for a real product. The course has a segmented approach, allowing students to practice application of important concepts in the classroom and engage in teamwork. The segments build upon one another to allow students to create a complete and logically reasoned marketing plan for their chosen product. In team, students prepare a written report and deliver an oral presentation about their product. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 1

MKTG 2800 - Introduction to Marketing (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Quinlan-Wilder, Tia
CRN: 1141
Course Description

Marketing is, at its core, the interface a company has with its customers, and what could be more important in business? This introductory course is a must for any business professional, and anyone seeking to be a savvy consumer or to learn about promoting oneself. It is a challenging, hands-on course with an integrated approach to learning the basic fundamentals of the subject. It develops a student?s ability to make sound planning decisions using real information from the external environment to determine market feasibility for a real product. The course has a segmented approach, allowing students to practice application of important concepts in the classroom and engage in teamwork. The segments build upon one another to allow students to create a complete and logically reasoned marketing plan for their chosen product. In team, students prepare a written report and deliver an oral presentation about their product. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 1

MKTG 2800 - Introduction to Marketing (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Quinlan-Wilder, Tia
CRN: 1970
Course Description

Marketing is, at its core, the interface a company has with its customers, and what could be more important in business? This introductory course is a must for any business professional, and anyone seeking to be a savvy consumer or to learn about promoting oneself. It is a challenging, hands-on course with an integrated approach to learning the basic fundamentals of the subject. It develops a student?s ability to make sound planning decisions using real information from the external environment to determine market feasibility for a real product. The course has a segmented approach, allowing students to practice application of important concepts in the classroom and engage in teamwork. The segments build upon one another to allow students to create a complete and logically reasoned marketing plan for their chosen product. In team, students prepare a written report and deliver an oral presentation about their product. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 1

MKTG 2910 - Consumer Behavior (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Quinlan-Wilder, Tia
CRN: 1143
Course Description

What?s the real reason some consumers want a big SUV? Maybe it?s not for offroading after all! This course is a fascinating look at why consumers buy what they do, and there is often more than meets the eye. CB uses frameworks from psychology and other disciplines to describe how consumers learn and how they make decisions about their purchases. The course also delves deeper into consumer demographic and psychographic characteristics and all of these concepts are then integrated and applied to designing appropriate marketing strategies for different segments. Students have an excellent opportunity to learn more about the human mind and practical applications for marketing efforts. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor

MKTG 2920 - Business-to-Business Marketing (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Lutz, Michele
CRN: 1156
Course Description

Ever wonder how the food you eat and the clothes you wear arrive at your favorite stores? While business-to-consumer (B2C) marketing may be more familiar to many of us, nearly 75% of all marketing positions in the U.S. and around the globe are in the B2B sector. This calls for unique marketing techniques in approaching and building relationships with organizational customers, the dynamics of which are explored and discussed in this class. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor

MKTG 3480 - Foundations of Digital Marketing (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Lutz, Michele
CRN: 1157
Course Description

Students typically see the importance of new digital technologies in their own lives, and businesses too much now connect with customers and other business through digital channels and adjust their marketing mix in order to succeed. This course provides the knowledge and skills to plan and implement a digital marketing strategy, create and manage digital marketing campaigns, and select and use the most effective tools and technologies to achieve the business's objectives. Students learn how to successfully integrate online tools including search engine optimization, pay-per-click advertising, email marketing, blogs, viral marketing, social media, and online PR within the overall marketing mix. In addition, students study the similarites and differences covering the mix of elements in traditional and digital marketing, along with other topics such as customer relationship marketing, permission and consumer concerns around privacy, trust, and security. Marketers with expertise in digital marketing are an invaluable asset to any organization as emerging technology continues to force organizations to adapt in order to excel in the digital age. Guest speakers have included best in class online retailers like Sierra Trading Post and Gaiam. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and DCB checkpoint two or marketing minor.

MKTG 3490 - Social Media Marketing (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Myers, Michael
CRN: 1189
Course Description

Social media marketing is an evolving field with consumers driving the changes marketers are seeing. Based on your business model, social media may be more than just distribution and prosumers may be a part of your long-term business strategy. This class illuminates the increasing importance of social media as it relates to consumer behavior and the purchase cycle. This course also develops a strategic model for a diverse range of businesses (B2B, B2C, Product, Service, Online, Online with Brick and Mortar) that empowers students as a marketer to determine their best strategy. Cross listed with MKTG 4815. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800.

MKTG 3495 - Tech in Marketing: Design Tools and Digital Foundations (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Myers, Michael
CRN: 1187
Course Description

We will be learning how to use HTML, CSS, Adobe Photoshop, and Adobe Illustrator.

MKTG 3630 - International Marketing (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Paul, Pallab
CRN: 1159
Course Description

The shrinking planet and constant pressure to maintain a firm?s growth mean that global marketing continues to grow in importance. This course introduces the various economic, social, cultural, political, and legal dimensions of international marketing from conceptual, methodological and application perspectives, and emphasizes how these international environmental factors should affect, and can be integrated into, marketing programs and strategies. This course provides students with methods for analyzing world markets and their respective consumers and environments, and to equip students with the skills in developing and implementing marketing strategies and decision making in international context. It is designed based on a combination of lectures and discussions of relevant concepts, case analyses of real global marketing issues, videos and readings from the business press, country snapshots, and a group research project in which student teams launch a discrete product in a foreign country of their choice. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and Daniels UG Checkpoint 2 1 or Marketing Minor Non-Business 2 1.

MKTG 3660 - Sports & Entertainment Marketing
M W06/13 - 07/155:30 pm to 9:30 pmKitts, Brian
CRN: 1163
Course Description

There are few products about which consumers are more passionate than their sports and entertainment expenditures, so this topic is always an exciting one in marketing. This course provides an in-depth look at the processes and practices of marketing sports, concerts, film and other entertainment. The course emphasizes the practical use of advertising, promotion and public relations in creating athlete or entertainer images, providing a quality fan experience, promoting sponsorships or driving event ticket sales. Cross listed with MKTG 4660. Prerequisite: MKTG 2800 and Daniels UG Checkpoint 2 1 or Marketing Minor Non-Business 2 1.

MKTG 3705 - Brand Management (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M T W R F06/13 - 06/248:00 am to 12:00 pmBaack, Daniel
CRN: 1125
Course Description

Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and Daniels UG Checkpoint 2 1 or Marketing Minor Non-Business 2 1.

MKTG 3705 - International Consumer Behavior (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Paul, Pallab
CRN: 1161
Course Description

Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and Daniels UG Checkpoint 2 1 or Marketing Minor Non-Business 2 1.

Mathematics (MATH)
MATH 1010 - Elements of College Algebra (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M W06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 am 
CRN: 1405
Course Description

This course is designed to review the required algebra skills to be successful in Business Calculus. The following topics are covered: review of basic algebra, solving equations and inequalities, rectangular coordinate systems and graphing, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, and solving exponential and logarithmic equations. Students who completed a MATH course numbered 1200 or higher may not take this course.

MATH 1070 - College Algebra and Trigonometry (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
M T W R07/18 - 08/119:20 am to 11:50 am 
CRN: 1410
Course Description

Selected topics in algebra and analytic trigonometry intended to prepare students for the calculus sequence. Cannot be used to satisfy the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Students who completed a MATH course numbered 1951 or higher may not take this course.

MATH 1200 - Calculus for Business and Social Sciences (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amFlaherty, Kelly
CRN: 1406
Course Description

This is a one-quarter course for students in business, social sciences, and liberal arts. It covers elementary differential calculus with emphasis on applications to business and the social sciences. Topics include functions, graphs, limits, continuity, differentiation, and mathematical models. Students are required to attend weekly labs. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

MATH 1951 - Calculus I (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amReiber, Allegra
CRN: 1407
Course Description

Limits, continuity, differentiation of functions of one variable, applications of the derivative. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: MATH 1070 or equivalent.

MATH 1952 - Calculus II (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
M T W R07/18 - 08/119:20 am to 11:50 am 
CRN: 1408
Course Description

Differentiation and integration of functions of one variable especially focusing on the theory, techniques and applications of integration. Prerequisite: MATH 1951.

MATH 1953 - Calculus III (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amOrmes, Nicholas
CRN: 1409
Course Description

Integration of functions of one variable, infinite sequences and series, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Prerequisite: MATH 1952 OR math 1962.

MATH 2050 - Symbolic Logic (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Nathan, Marco
CRN: 1941
Course Description

Modern propositional logic; symbolization and calculus of predicates, especially predicates of relation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Cross listed with PHIL 2160.

MATH 2050 - Symbolic Logic (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Nathan, Marco
CRN: 1942
Course Description

Modern propositional logic; symbolization and calculus of predicates, especially predicates of relation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Cross listed with PHIL 2160.

Media Film Journalism Studies (MFJS)
MFJS 2000 - Introduction to Film Criticism (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/011:00 pm to 4:20 pmBuxton, Rodney
CRN: 1268
Course Description

Theories and methods of social, cultural and aesthetic criticism of film; emphasis on critical writing. Laboratory fee required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MFJS 2140 - Newswriting & Reporting (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Demont-Heinrich, Christof
CRN: 1269
Course Description

Fundamentals of newswriting and reporting for print and broadcast journalism. Laboratory fee required.

MFJS 2210 - Introduction to Media and Culture (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Liberman, Rachael
CRN: 1270
Course Description

Course introduces students to the organization of the U.S. media industries and their historical and contemporary role in U.S. culture. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

MFJS 3260 - History of Photography: American Cultural Perspectives (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Henry, Elizabeth
CRN: 1271
Course Description

The class will examine images and image-makers from various time periods throughout the history of (mostly) American photography, and will contextualize the production of the photographs with relevant historical and critical writings. Class time will be divided between slide lectures, film/video screenings, discussions of the readings and student presentations. We will also explore photojournalism in American media history including studying examples of photographs or movements that have influenced American society and culture.

MFJS 3656 - Immigration, Communication & Border Cultures
U M T W R F S06/12 - 06/18 Thompson, Margaret,
Suarez Toro, Maria
CRN: 1017
Course Description

This is a one-week intensive travel course that takes place in Tucson, Arizona and south to the US-Mexican border region. The focus of this experiential learning class is to study immigration issues, border cultures, and the role of communication and media through testimonies of immigrants, and visits to key sites such as the migrant trail, immigration detention center and courts. Also included are talks by activists and officials involved in the immigration debate. Class meets for two pre-class sessions in spring quarter. Requires junior standing. Cross-listed with MFJS 4656.

MFJS 3900 - Topics in Media Film Journalism Studies: Special Event Planning: Behind the Scenes
 05/24 - 05/24  
CRN: 1019
MFJS 3900 - Topics in Media Film and Journalism Studies: Cannabis Journalism: Covering & Reporting New Normal
M T W R F06/13 - 06/1710:00 am to 4:00 pmMatranga, Andrew
CRN: 1024
Music-Academic Classes (MUAC)
MUAC 1001 - Music Theory I (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
 06/13 - 07/01 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1183
MUAC 1002 - Music Theory I (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1196
MUAC 1003 - Music Theory I (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1197
MUAC 1017 - History of Rock and Roll (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/011:00 pm to 4:50 pmKireilis, Ramon
CRN: 1145
Course Description

The "birth of rock" occurred in the mid 1950's as a result of the convergence of pop, country and western, and rhythm and blues. This course traces that evolution by way of examining a broad picture of the general flow of those styles and their artists. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Note: Music majors do not receive Common Curriculum credit for this course.

MUAC 1020 - Aural Skills I
 06/13 - 07/07 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1201
Course Description

Development of aural analysis skills in meter, mode, harmonic function and song forms through solfeggio, singing and dictation.

MUAC 1021 - Aural Skills I (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 2062
Course Description

Development of aural analysis skills in meter, mode, harmonic function and song forms through solfeggio, singing and dictation.

MUAC 1022 - Aural Skills I (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1202
Course Description

Development of aural analysis in meter, mode, harmonic function and song forms through solfeggio, singing and dictation.

MUAC 2004 - Music Theory II (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1198
MUAC 2005 - Music Theory II (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1199
MUAC 2006 - Music Theory II (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1200
MUAC 2020 - Aural Skills II (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1203
Course Description

Dictation and sight singing of melodic, harmonic and contrapuntal examples from common practice period.

MUAC 2021 - Aural Skills II (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1204
Course Description

Dictation and sight singing of melodic, harmonic and contrapuntal examples from common practice period.

MUAC 2022 - Aural Skills II (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
 06/13 - 07/08 Kingsland, Lawrence
CRN: 1205
Course Description

Dictation and sight singing of melodic, harmonic and contrapuntal examples from common practice period.

Music-Ensembles (MUEN)
MUEN 3770 - Chamber Ensemble-Piano
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1146
Course Description

Small ensembles studying chamber music repertoire for various groups.

MUEN 3772 - Chamber Ensemble-Harp
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1147
Course Description

Small ensembles studying chamber music repertoire for various groups.

MUEN 3774 - Chamber Ensemble-Brass
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1148
Course Description

Small ensembles studying chamber music repertoire for various groups.

MUEN 3776 - Chamber Ensemble-Percussion
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1149
Course Description

Small ensembles studying chamber music repertoire for various groups.

MUEN 3777 - Chamber Ensemble-Strings
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1150
Course Description

Small ensembles studying chamber music repertoire for various groups.

MUEN 3778 - Chamber Ensemble-Woodwind
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1151
Course Description

Small ensembles studying chamber music repertoire for various groups.

MUEN 3800 - Vocal Chamber Ensemble
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1152
Course Description

A small group of outstanding singers interested in singing soloist vocal chamber music.

Music-Studio Lessons (MUPR)
MUPR 2210 - Piano
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1153
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2230 - Voice
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1154
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2250 - Violin
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1155
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2270 - Violoncello
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1167
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2290 - Viola
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1168
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2310 - Bass Violin
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1169
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2330 - Harp
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1170
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2370 - Clarinet
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1171
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2390 - Flute
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1172
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2460 - Bassoon
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1173
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2480 - Trombone
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1174
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2500 - Trumpet
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1175
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2520 - Horn
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1176
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2540 - Euphonium
 05/24 - 05/24  
CRN: 1177
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2560 - Tuba
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1178
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2660 - Percussion
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1179
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2680 - Oboe
M T W R F S06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1180
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2780 - Saxophone
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1181
Course Description

BA music emphasis.

MUPR 2920 - Composition
M T W R F06/19 - 07/01  
CRN: 1182
Course Description

One-on-one instruction for composition majors.

Philosophy (PHIL)
PHIL 2007 - Philosophy and Video Games (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Surber, Jere
CRN: 1124
Course Description

Traditional and novel metaphysical, ethical, political, and aesthetic issues both arising within video games and posed by this still developing medium. No prerequisites. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2144 - 20th-Century Philosophy (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:00 am to 12:20 pmBrent, Michael
CRN: 1474
Course Description

A general overview of prominent 20th-century philosophers and philosophical movements. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2160 - Symbolic Logic (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Nathan, Marco
CRN: 1127
Course Description

Principles and methods of formal reasoning, their practical and philosophical applications. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Cross listed with MATH 2050.

PHIL 2160 - Symbolic Logic (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Nathan, Marco
CRN: 1129
Course Description

Principles and methods of formal reasoning, their practical and philosophical applications. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Cross listed with MATH 2050.

PHIL 2666 - 21st Century Thought about Doomsday, Singularity, and Superintelligence Arguments (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Surber, Jere
CRN: 1363
Course Description

A presentation and discussion of some of the 'exteme' themes of 21st century philosophy, including 'Sensative Conditions,' 'Doomsday Arguments,' 'singularities' involving artifical intelligence, whether we are living in a 'computer simulation,' and the possibility of 'extraterrestrial intelligence' and the issues this raises. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2700 - Biomedical Ethics (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amBrown, Jeffrey
CRN: 1128
Course Description

Discussion of some of the most pressing ethical issues engaged by contemporary developments in biology and medicine. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 3702 - Topics in Philosophy: Animal Ethics
M T W R F06/06 - 06/109:00 am to 5:00 pmNail, Thomas
CRN: 1021
Course Description

Prerequisite: 10 hours of Philosophy at 2000 level or permission of instructor.

Physics & Astronomy (PHYS)
PHYS 1111 - General Physics I (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R F07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 12:20 pmIona, Steven
CRN: 1230
Course Description

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students in any Natural Science and Mathematics field of study. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Algebra and trigonometry are used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. Students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214. Lab fee associated with this course.

PHYS 1111 - General Physics I (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M W F07/05 - 07/221:00 pm to 3:00 pmIona, Steven
CRN: 1231
Course Description

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students in any Natural Science and Mathematics field of study. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Algebra and trigonometry are used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. Students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214. Lab fee associated with this course.

Psychology (PSYC)
PSYC 1001 - Foundations of Psychological Science (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Miller, Pamela
CRN: 1331
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of mind and behavior. It includes topics such as the biological basis of behavior, the developmental transitions from infancy through old age, the principles underlying perception, learning and memory, and the ways in which behavior is affected by its physical, social, and cultural context. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PSYC 1001 - Foundations of Psychological Science (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Miller, Pamela
CRN: 1922
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of mind and behavior. It includes topics such as the biological basis of behavior, the developmental transitions from infancy through old age, the principles underlying perception, learning and memory, and the ways in which behavior is affected by its physical, social, and cultural context. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PSYC 2031 - Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Rossi, Christy
CRN: 1288
Course Description

The goal of this course is to examine the relations between brain and behavior to better understand how complex behavior is mediated by the brain. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2070 - Child and Lifespan Development (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Watamura, Sarah
CRN: 1286
Course Description

This course explores physical, cognitive, social and emotional development across the lifespan, from the prenatal period through death. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 3080 - Drugs and Behavior (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/0810:30 am to 1:00 pmRossi, Christy
CRN: 1289
Course Description

Nature of licit and illicit drugs; their short- and long-term biological and psychological effects. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2031, must be a major or minor in psychology, must have at least sophomore standing.

PSYC 3530 - Child Psychopathology (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Gudino, Omar
CRN: 1287
Course Description

Child Psychopathology surveys the latest theory and research in the field of developmental psychopathology, which is the study of abnormal behavior from a developmental perspective. Students learn about what the emotional and behavioral disorders of childhood and adolescence are, what causes them, and how they are treated. Additionally, the course covers how we judge what is considered to be abnormal or atypical, how we classify abnormal or atypical behavior, and how we acquire knowledge about developmental psychopathology. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2500, must be either a major or minor in psychology, must at least have sophomore standing.

Public Policy (PPOL)
PPOL 2710 - Demography of Public Policy
Online06/13 - 07/18 Salucci, Lapo
CRN: 1327
Course Description

"Demography is destiny." The consequences for American public policy are profound. America is aging, but becoming more diverse. A society in the midst of dynamic change is a society full of possibilities, but vulnerable to conflict. Values become indeterminate, with traditional communities vying for legitimacy with emergent cultures. Social movements, often populist in nature, challenge the established political order. This course focuses on the delineation of effective public policies to deal with demographic challenges, including (1) immigration policy; (2) the process of assimilation; (3) education; (4) geographic realignment; (5) competitive advantage of the United States relative to the European Union, Russia, and China. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PPOL 3701 - Topics in Public Policy:Getting Results Inside the Beltway, Washington D.C.
U M T W R F06/05 - 06/10 Caldwell, Richard
CRN: 1007
Real Estate (REAL)
REAL 1700 - The Business of the Built Environment (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/1110:30 am to 12:40 pmHolt, Eric
CRN: 1059
Course Description

An exploration of the importance of real estate and the built environment and its impacts and influences on how we live, work, and play. The course considers a "cradle to grave" sustainable model that links the various phases, functions, and professions of real estate, project delivery, and asset/facility management to create holistic, value generating solutions for society. Professional practices/skillsets associated with the many career options that engage the built environment are demonstrated. This course has no pre-requisites and is open to all undergraduate students.

REAL 2777 - Real Estate Principles and Practices (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
T R06/13 - 08/118:10 am to 10:20 amLevine, Mark
CRN: 1064
Course Description

This course is designed to give the student a broad overview of the field of real estate, exploring both legal and financial aspects of real property ownership. It serves as the practical introduction to the US perspective on real estate for students with little or no real estate experience. Topics covered in this course include property rights, title concepts, deeds, mortgages and purchase and sale contracts. From both a commercial and residential perspective students will explore aspects of real estate brokerage, financing, appraisal and investing. Other areas covered include fair housing, taxes, leases, zoning, agency and careers within the field of real estate. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2. Note: Does not count toward any Real Estate major or minor.

REAL 3007 - Real Estate Financial Analysis (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M W06/13 - 08/117:50 pm to 10:00 pmEngelstad, Jeffrey
CRN: 1062
Course Description

Alternative analysis formats that can be applied to a wide array of real estate analysis issues; simulates working/decision-making environment; structured overview of analysis tools focused on specific facets of multidimensional real estate decision-making environment; applications in investment analysis, feasibility analysis, valuation, market analysis, and report writing and presentation. Cross listed with REAL 4007. Prerequisites: REAL 3307 and degree checkpoint 2.

REAL 3337 - Real Estate Securities and Syndications (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M W06/13 - 08/118:10 am to 10:20 amLevine, Mark
CRN: 1057
Course Description

Introduction to real estate securities; emphasis on private offerings; determining whether a contemplated transaction involves a security, and what happens if it does; exemptions from registration (Reg D); registration requirements; investor suitability, how to syndicate, acquisition of property, marketing of the property, tax structure and formation of syndication, compensation to syndicators, real estate tax considerations. Application of sustainability concepts is important in this class dealing with real estate securities issues. Cross listed with REAL 4337. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2.

REAL 3377 - Real Estate Investment Seminar (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
M W06/13 - 08/115:30 pm to 7:40 pmEngelstad, Jeffrey
CRN: 1060
Course Description

Capstone course for graduating seniors. Case method applied to real property development and real estate investment analysis for decision making; computer software for discounted cash flow, risk and simulation analysis; growth, sustainability and environmental issues, portfolio strategy and analysis. Cross listed with REAL 4477. Prerequisites: REAL 3307, degree checkpoint 2 and senior standing.

Religious Studies (RLGS)
RLGS 2102 - Judaism, Christianity & Islam (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Raschke, Carl
CRN: 1245
Course Description

This course introduces students to the three major monotheistic religious traditions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In the process of tracing the long and rich histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, we examine the beliefs and practices that became central and definitive for Jews, Christians, and Muslims. We begin with the ancient heritage of each religion (scriptures, founders, early institutions). Then we explore how these foundational traditions were preserved and re-invigorated in response to centuries of social change and critical moments of political upheaval. Most significant, in this regard, is the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim encounter with their respective holy Scriptures--as generation after generation of adherents have attempted to understand the revealed words of God, to proclaim their continual relevance for all places and all times and to inscribe them upon their bodies and hearts through prayer, worship, and daily life. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2202 - New Testament (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Robbins, Gregory
CRN: 1246
Course Description

This course takes a multifaceted approach (historical, literary, and critical) to the writings that comprise the Christian New Testament. The New Testament are read as a collection of primary documents that chronicle the primitive Church?s slow and often painful process of self-definition. In these writings it is possible to discern the tension that arose because of the strong religious and cultural ties early Christianity maintained with Palestinian Judaism, from which it emerged as a sectarian or reform movement. The careful reader also finds evidence of the new religion?s encounter with the Greco-Roman world from whose variegated ethos and culture it borrowed considerably on the way to becoming an important religious force in the first century. In exploring the New Testament, then, we attempt to recover something of the sense of what it meant to be a Christian in New Testament times. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2202.

Sociology (SOCI)
SOCI 1810 - Understanding Social Life (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:50 pmColomy, Paul
CRN: 1232
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the discipline of sociology and to the insights it provides into the human condition. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

SOCI 1810 - Understanding Social Life
M T W R07/18 - 08/051:00 pm to 4:30 pmNguyen-Perez, Raul
CRN: 1364
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the discipline of sociology and to the insights it provides into the human condition. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

SOCI 2795 - Capital Punishment
M T W R06/13 - 06/249:20 am to 2:20 pmPhillips, Ronald
CRN: 1234
Course Description

This course examines three main topics: the history of capital punishment (facts and trends, public opinion, legislation, and landmark Supreme Court cases); arguments often made for abolition (arbitrariness, cost, and innocence); and arguments often made for retention (deterrence, incapacitation, and retribution). Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 3998 - Criminology Assessment (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
 06/13 - 08/11 Martinez, Lisa
CRN: 1239
Course Description

This course involves a required assessment of graduating sociology and criminology majors' knowledge of the discipline based on courses taken. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810, SOCI 2005, SOCI 2006, SOCI 2020, and SOCI 2250; permission of instructor.

SOCI 3999 - Sociology Assessment (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
 06/13 - 08/11 Martinez, Lisa
CRN: 1240
Course Description

This course involves a required assessment of graduating sociology and criminology majors' knowledge of the discipline based on courses taken. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810, SOCI 2005, SOCI 2006, SOCI 2020, and SOCI 2420; permission of instructor.

Spanish (SPAN)
SPAN 1001 - Beginning Spanish (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:40 pmLeahy, Chad
CRN: 1305
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1002 - Beginning Spanish (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 12:40 pmCasanas, Oriol
CRN: 1306
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1003 - Beginning Spanish (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/119:20 am to 12:40 pmWoods, Carmen
CRN: 1307
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 2300 - Iberian Culture & Civilization
Abroad06/25 - 08/19 Torre, Javier
CRN: 1308
Course Description

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

SPAN 2300 - Iberian Culture & Civilization
Abroad06/25 - 08/19 Walter, Susan
CRN: 1309
Course Description

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

Theatre (THEA)
THEA 1810 - The Process of Theatre: Page to Stage
M T W R07/18 - 08/059:20 am to 12:40 pmMcDonald, Steven
CRN: 1140
Course Description

Exploration of the process playwrights, directors, actors, and designers use in creating a theatrical production. Individual sections may focus on single areas only?please see department for current offerings. In this course, students will demonstrate the ability to create or interpret the texts, ideas or artifacts of human culture. They will also identify and analyze the connections between these things and the human experience/perception of the world. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

THEA 2870 - Acting I (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
M W R07/18 - 08/1110:30 am to 1:50 pmBarbour, Frederic
CRN: 1142
Course Description

Exploration of acting through physical and vocal exercises, followed by scene study. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Writing (WRIT)
WRIT 1122 - Rhetoric and Academic Writing (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Stacks, Geoffrey
CRN: 1739
Course Description

On completing this course, students are expected to have enhanced the following knowledge and skills: analytic and critical reading strategies; a basic understanding of rhetorical situations and rhetorical analysis; the ability to write for specific audiences and discourse communities, using effective conversations for these situations; the ability to write texts that are organized, coherent and substantive, demonstrating rhetorical, linguistic design and analytical competence. The course provides instruction and practice in academic and civic writing for well-educated readers. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as additional exercises. Final portfolio.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M W F06/13 - 07/0810:00 am to 1:20 pmSinger, Daniel
CRN: 1740
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Benz, Bradley
CRN: 1741
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Tiedemann, John
CRN: 1742
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

WRIT 2050 - Style and Rhetorical Grammar (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
M T W07/18 - 08/111:00 pm to 3:00 pmParrish, Juli
CRN: 1744
Course Description

"Be concise. Don't split infinitives. Write with flow. Don't end a sentence with a preposition. Avoid the passive voice. Never use "I" in academic writing." Everyone has these maxims about writing and grammar. This course will interrogate those maxims, and provide systematic ways to draft, revise, and polish prose based on the needs and demands of the audience. More specifically, students consider matters of sentence structure and sentence rhythm, cohesion and concision, as well as voice and point of view. Through a series of shorter and longer writing assignments, in-class exercises and activities, and course readings, students hone their writing and grammar skills, all with the goal of writing with improved clarity and grace. The course is open to all students who want to take their writing to a next level of sophistication, clarity, and range. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122 or permission of instructor.

Advanced Seminar

Advanced Seminar (ASEM)
ASEM 2423 - The American Road Trip (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/221:00 pm to 4:20 pmAlfrey, Shawn
CRN: 1475
Course Description

As Frederick Jackson Turner told us back in the 19th Century, American cultural identity has hinged on the idea of an ever-receding frontier and the possibility of reaching it. We will chart how the road figures as both a promise and a burden, and how it reflects changing social and cultural issues in American life. We will consider documents of fiction, philosophy and history as well as film and aspects of popular culture as we consider the America fascination with the road and the careers of its many and diverse travelers. Enrollment restricted to students in the Honors Program.

ASEM 2516 - Do the Wicked Prosper? (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Dixon, Sandra
CRN: 1242
Course Description

This course revolves around a question, which is famously quoted from the Bible, "Why do the wicked prosper?" The quotation presupposes that the wicked do prosper, but many strands of human thought challenge the supposition. This course examines the students' reactions to this question and leads them to approach the question and their reactions to it from a variety of academic perspectives.

ASEM 2529 - Analyzing the American Dream - Expressionist Film in 1950's Hollywood (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Gault, James
CRN: 1274
Course Description

This course focuses on the output of a few Hollywood directors (primarily Ida Lupino, Nicholas Ray and Douglas Sirk) who seem to reflect the dominant ideologies of post-war Hollywood. On the surface, their films celebrate middle-class success, a simple American can-do attitude and, most important for this class, characters who seem to reestablish pre-war expectations of femininity and masculinity. Rules of femininity, masculinity and sexuality are a constant focus for these directors, and each has his or her own approach to exploring the repercussions of strict gender assignment.

ASEM 2539 - Health, Media and the Self (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Botta, Renee
CRN: 1328
Course Description

What are cultural beliefs about health, about prevention and about risk? We focus on how culture, media, peers, medical professionals and family influence how we construct and define health and the many key concepts scholars have linked to the notion of being healthy, preventing ill health and pursuing good health. We also examine the impact and function of these definitions on our everyday lives by exploring what health perceptions have to do with one's self concept, identity, self esteem, relationships, expectations, attitudes, beliefs and behaviors.

ASEM 2557 - Body & Sexuality in Religions (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:40 pmSchofield, Alison
CRN: 1243
Course Description

This course examines the unique place of the body in biblical religion. We ask how the Bible and its interpreters have shaped current views on sex and the gendered body in Western society. How has the Bible been (mis)used in relation to current understandings of the physical body? Is the saying that a "human" does not have a body, but is a body as true for the Hebrew Bible as the Christian New Testament? How has Judaism and Christianity (de)valued sexuality, procreation and celibacy? How do the biblical traditions shape our modern opinions about the ideal physical body and body modification? How can we understand "out-of-body" experiences and notions of death and afterlife in Western religion? Students are encouraged to interpret the Bible and their own beliefs from a uniquely embodied perspective.

ASEM 2560 - America Through Foreign Eyes (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Demont-Heinrich, Christof
CRN: 1275
Course Description

The United States, and Americans, occupy a unique, privileged and powerful position in the contemporary world order. Indeed, according to many scholarly and public accounts, the U.S. has achieved unprecedented status as the preeminent world power. Yet, despite or, paradoxically, perhaps because of its status as what some have called a world "hyperpower," large numbers of Americans are mostly, if not totally unaware of what U.S. global preeminence means to them and to other people around the world. This course aims to inspire critical reflection on the student's part about the role of the United States - its political and economic systems and practices, its culture, and most fundamentally its social actors, meaning its people(s), in a globalizing world.

ASEM 2566 - Society Through Literature and Cinema (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1518
Course Description

This course will study the interconnection of human societies (or nation states) as evident in different kinds of narratives. Discussing literary and film narratives in particular, we will examine the beliefs and influences that shape relationships within the same society as well as the beliefs and influences that shape relationships between different peoples and societies. Our examination will include an exploration of how these beliefs and influences are generated and modified. Our study will be aided by the interpretive insights of artists and visionaries. Our examples will be taken from different regions of the world.

ASEM 2572 - Philosophy, Psychology, Neuroscience, and Free Will (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/011:00 pm to 4:20 pmBrent, Michael
CRN: 1123
Course Description

This seminar introduces students to the topic of human freedom from the perspective of philosophy, neuroscience, and psychology. If everything that you do and have ever done is the inevitable byproduct of the political, social, economic, cultural, familial, psychological, and neurological forces at work within and around you, in what sense could you be free and morally accountable for your actions? In what sense could you be worthy of praise for your accomplishments and blame for your failures? The course will address the topic of free will using contemporary scholarship in philosophy, neuroscience, and developmental and social psychology, and we will ask questions such as: What, exactly, is free will? What can our understanding of causation tell us about free will? What is moral responsibility, and how is it related to free will? What brain processes underlie our decisions? Prerequisite: Completion of all other Common Curriculum requirements.

ASEM 2576 - Art, Thought, Spirituality (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Raschke, Carl
CRN: 1244
Course Description

This course examines the close and complex relationship between esthetic expression and private religiosity, or "spirituality." The course will examine how theories as well as personal accounts of artistic creativity, experience and appreciation can both broaden and deepen our understanding of the inner life that is otherwise communicated in religious terms and how artistic expression can also have a quasi-religious or "spiritual" character. The central objective will be to illumine the way in which the construction of the individual self and the formation of the personal identity are intimately tied to different quests that are artistic and spiritual at once.

ASEM 2577 - Cultural Intersections (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1265
Course Description

In this course, we explore the dynamics of cultural reception or the translational dimension of modern culture, particularly the reception of narratives within particular cultures and beyond. Our main focus is the principles that integrate and divide people along the lines of race, class, ethnicity and culture. Our journey involves studies of cultural contacts, contexts and narratives from Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas.

ASEM 2579 - From Literature to Film (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1266
Course Description

In this course, we examine the adaptation of literary works into films. We closely study selected modern literary works and the film interpretations of each work. Focusing on the transition from one narrative form to another, the course enhances the critical skill of students as well as their creative ability with respect to cinematic translations. We, therefore, also have mini scriptwriting workshops as a way of imaginatively highlighting the sort of considerations that go into the making of the film script.

ASEM 2581 - Forgiveness, Politics and Film (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Wadsworth, Nancy
CRN: 1423
Course Description

This course covers a number of reconciliation frameworks that have been employed as transformative and peacemaking strategies in various interpersonal, social and political contexts. We discuss the value (and limitations) of core reconciliation concepts, see how they have been used productively, and consider their possible application to ongoing problems in the world today.

ASEM 2596 - Politics of Reconciliation (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Sun, Jing
CRN: 1544
Course Description

This class addresses the national and international efforts to seek justice and achieve reconciliation. It examines how state and non-state actors reflect on an unfortunate or hostile past with a designated "other": how did their relations and interactions with this targeted "other" go wrong? What were the material, philosophical and emotional grounds to breed such hostilities? What were the consequences? Has the memory of the "past self" and "past others" shaped the way the two groups interact today? Why do some actors refuse to say "sorry," and why do some victims refuse to forgive? What are the similarities and differences among various reconciliation projects? In this class, we lead students to explore these challenging yet exciting questions.

ASEM 2597 - Unwrapping the Rhetoric of Consumption (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Hunter, Keeley
CRN: 1138
Course Description

Unwrapping the Rhetoric of Consumption: A Critical Investigation of the Relationship between Communication, Consumption, Shopping, and Identity is a writing intensive course that offers an introduction to the study of consumption as a communicative phenomenon. People often use consumption to demonstrate who they are, their worth/importance, their relational ties, their gender, etc. The course will examine the socially positive and negative implications of these practices of consumption. Completion of all Common Curriculum requirements is required prior to registering for this class.

ASEM 2609 - Literature of Nature and Apocalypse (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Stratton, Billy
CRN: 1267
Course Description

Concern about the declining state of the environment has been a topic of longstanding interest, from Henry David Thoreau to John Muir, and writers like Edward Abbey, Ernest Callenbach, Louise Erdrich, T.C. Boyle, Octavia Burtler, Cormac McCarthy and others. This writing intensive course examines questions relating to environmental activism and social structures predicated upon technological and materialist culture. It considers how American writers have reassessed the relation between religious beliefs and notions of utopia and apocalypse. It examines and analyzes timely and relevant historical, literary, and philosophical issues relating to the current state of the environment.

ASEM 2620 - Inventing America (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Hicks, Darrin
CRN: 1139
Course Description

This class introduces students to exemplary public documents, primarily in the form of speeches, which address the promises set out in the preamble of the U.S. Declaration of Independence: the rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The course traces how these promises have been articulated by a succession of public actors ranging from U.S. Presidents to members of radical political factions. The course always addresses three major political movements: (1) the movement for political inclusion of Blacks, beginning with early abolitionists and extending to the struggle for civil rights, including the black power movement; (2) the movement for the political inclusion of women, beginning with the suffragists and extending to include feminism, including the fights over sexual freedom; and (3) the struggle over economic rights, beginning with early U.S. socialist and anarchist movements and extending into the contest over the creation and pruning of the U.S. welfare system.

ASEM 2657 - Harry Potter and Esotericism (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/018:10 am to 11:20 amWarlick, M.
CRN: 1745
Course Description

Today's students have grown up with J. K. Rowling's seven Harry Potter books. This incredible publishing phenomenon has inspired children and adults alike to devour 500-page books within days of publication, at a time when statistics seem to indicate that people are no longer reading. Why would these tales of English school children learning a curriculum of magical skills have so captured the imagination of a generation of young people living in a post-modern world? The purpose of this class then is to examine the role of esoteric themes that pervade the Harry Potter books and to investigate the history of those subjects from the Middle Ages to the present, by focusing on the visual traditions they inspired. Areas discussed include the history of magic and witchcraft, classical and Celtic mythology, alchemy, astrology, fantastic beasts, "books of secrets" and their healing potions, the mythic lore of botany, divination and various esoteric paths of enlightenment.

ASEM 2660 - Cinematic Storytelling (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Henry, Elizabeth
CRN: 1276
Course Description

The course acquaints students with basic concepts and methods used in the analysis of stories, the theoretical assumptions and models describing and justifying those concepts and models, and practical applications of story analysis in cinematic and script form. We begin with Aristotle, provide an interdisciplinary and historical overview of narratology, move to literary narrative analysis, and then focus on film-theoretical approaches while gaining practical skills in analysis of the elements of storytelling in fiction, film and television. In this way, students gain some historical perspectives on the form and function of story - its timeless prevalence as well as its more current iterations.

ASEM 2660 - Cinematic Storytelling (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Henry, Elizabeth
CRN: 1818
Course Description

The course acquaints students with basic concepts and methods used in the analysis of stories, the theoretical assumptions and models describing and justifying those concepts and models, and practical applications of story analysis in cinematic and script form. We begin with Aristotle, provide an interdisciplinary and historical overview of narratology, move to literary narrative analysis, and then focus on film-theoretical approaches while gaining practical skills in analysis of the elements of storytelling in fiction, film and television. In this way, students gain some historical perspectives on the form and function of story - its timeless prevalence as well as its more current iterations.

ASEM 2663 - The Dark Knight Exposed: Exploring the Complicatedness of Superheroes (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W06/13 - 07/0110:00 am to 1:20 pmTaczak, Kara
CRN: 1743
Course Description

The 21st century has seen a rebirth of interest in fictional superheroes, and this course will explore how such characters can be seen as representing aspects of contemporary society. Especially noteworthy are conflicts between good and evil that so many superheroes embody. As Batman character Harvey Dent explains, ?You either die a hero or you live long enough to see yourself become the villain.? The course uses readings from psychology, literary studies, and popular culture to explore figures from the X-Men, Superman, the Avengers, and other comics and movies, with a central case study focus on Batman. The goal is for students to come away with a deep understanding of and appreciation for the complexities of superheroes and what they represent: what conflicts hide below their surfaces and our society?s?

ASEM 2664 - Contemporary Issues in Africa (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
T R07/18 - 08/111:00 pm to 6:00 pmJoslin, Isaac
CRN: 1756
Course Description

Through the study of a variety of literary, visual, and oral cultural artifacts, this course will investigate contemporary issues of gender identity, education, development, and political culture in different areas of the African continent.

ASEM 2720 - Nazi Germany: History, Literature, Culture (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1302
Course Description

This course explores Germany's Nazi era. It focuses on themes like redemption, temptation, national community, conflict and memory while analyzing both texts and visuals from and related to the period. Prerequisite: Completion of all other Common Curriculum Requirements.

ASEM 2720 - Nazi Germany: History, Literature, Culture (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1304
Course Description

This course explores Germany's Nazi era. It focuses on themes like redemption, temptation, national community, conflict and memory while analyzing both texts and visuals from and related to the period. Prerequisite: Completion of all other Common Curriculum Requirements.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1206
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1759
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1928
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

ASEM 2789 - Deviant Bodies
M T W R07/18 - 08/059:20 am to 12:50 pmLevesque, Amie
CRN: 1454
Course Description

Students will explore the meanings of deviant bodies. They will examine narratives of fatness, illness, disabilities, sexualities, femininities, masculinities, race, and contamination from sociological, historical, anthropological, and feminist perspectives. Discussions and intensive writing about deviant bodies will be prompted by scholarship on embodiment, gender, and social inequality, through examinations of popular culture, social media, film, and students' own social interactions.

Analytical Inquiry: Natural & Physical World

Computer Science (COMP)
COMP 1101 - Analytical Inquiry I (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Jones, Benjamin
CRN: 1775
Course Description

Students explore the use of mathematics and computer programming in creating animations. Students create animations on their laptop computers using animation software. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

Mathematics (MATH)
MATH 1200 - Calculus for Business and Social Sciences (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amFlaherty, Kelly
CRN: 1406
Course Description

This is a one-quarter course for students in business, social sciences, and liberal arts. It covers elementary differential calculus with emphasis on applications to business and the social sciences. Topics include functions, graphs, limits, continuity, differentiation, and mathematical models. Students are required to attend weekly labs. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

MATH 1951 - Calculus I (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amReiber, Allegra
CRN: 1407
Course Description

Limits, continuity, differentiation of functions of one variable, applications of the derivative. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: MATH 1070 or equivalent.

MATH 2050 - Symbolic Logic (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Nathan, Marco
CRN: 1941
Course Description

Modern propositional logic; symbolization and calculus of predicates, especially predicates of relation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Cross listed with PHIL 2160.

MATH 2050 - Symbolic Logic (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Nathan, Marco
CRN: 1942
Course Description

Modern propositional logic; symbolization and calculus of predicates, especially predicates of relation. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Cross listed with PHIL 2160.

Philosophy (PHIL)
PHIL 2160 - Symbolic Logic (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Nathan, Marco
CRN: 1127
Course Description

Principles and methods of formal reasoning, their practical and philosophical applications. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Cross listed with MATH 2050.

PHIL 2160 - Symbolic Logic (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Nathan, Marco
CRN: 1129
Course Description

Principles and methods of formal reasoning, their practical and philosophical applications. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Cross listed with MATH 2050.

Analytical Inquiry: Society & Culture

Art - Studio (ARTS)
ARTS 1015 - Experiences in the Visual Arts
M T W R F07/11 - 07/229:00 am to 4:00 pmMacInnes, Roderick
CRN: 1279
Course Description

This course explores the language of the visual arts and how it can be used to communicate ideas about culture, history and the personal. Through hands-on exercises and experimentation in different media students create visual art works that interpret the world around them. This course focuses on different areas of the visual arts that change its focus depending on the area of expertise of the faculty teaching it. (Example: drawing, painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics, sculpture.) Students leave the course with a broader understanding of the visual arts, past and present. Students also leave with a more in-depth understanding of the creative process that will inform other areas of studies throughout the University and which will enrich their lives long into the future. Lab fee. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Communication (COMN)
COMN 2030 - Social Movement Rhetoric (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Hunter, Keeley
CRN: 1131
Course Description

This course explores the principle agency that less powerful groups have used for social change in recent U.S. history--the rhetoric of social movement. More specifically, we consider in concrete detail and theoretical nuance the capacity of ordinary people to persuade others, voice grievances, and thus challenge broader society. Our explorations focus primarily on the rhetoric of dissident (non-majority, non-State, often un-institutionalized and non-normative) voice in our culture--both on the "right" and the "left"-- as they have sought, and continue to seek, social change. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2210 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1132
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: What is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, we explore how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities "from the ground up." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with GWST 2212.

COMN 2210 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1133
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: What is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, we explore how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities "from the ground up." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with GWST 2212.

COMN 2220 - Race and Popular Culture (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Calafell, Bernadette
CRN: 1135
Course Description

This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2220 - Race and Popular Culture (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Calafell, Bernadette
CRN: 1136
Course Description

This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

COMN 2400 - Landmarks in Rhetorical Theory (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Hicks, Darrin
CRN: 1137
Course Description

This course is a survey of some of the major conceptual innovations in the history of rhetorical theory. In particular we will investigate the conceptions of rhetoric prevalent in antiquity and how they inform contemporary perspectives on rhetoric. In order to carry this off, we will conceptualize rhetoric as an attempt to answer the following questions: what is the relationship between what is true and what is the good. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

English (ENGL)
ENGL 1110 - Literary Inquiry (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Stratton, Billy
CRN: 1330
Course Description

Literary Inquiry introduces students to the variety of ways that poetry, fiction, and/or drama expand our understanding of what it means to be human. Topics vary to engage students in the rewarding process of interpreting the literary art form as a unique cultural expression. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2130 - World Literature (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1261
Course Description

A literary journey around the world, the focus of this course includes the study of modern literature from different parts of the world--such as Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Textual analysis as well as cultural and transnational contexts are emphasized. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ENGL 2710 - American Novel-19th & 20th Century (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Davis, Clark
CRN: 1262
Course Description

This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Gender and Women's Studies (GWST)
GWST 2215 - Selling Sex, Gender and the American Dream: 1950 - Present (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Feitz, Lindsey
CRN: 1283
Course Description

This introductory course analyzes how commercial culture has evolved into the defining cornerstone of American life over the last sixty years. The first half of the quarter well will examine the key historical movements including the Cold War, the Civil Rights/Women's and Gay Liberation movements and investigate how women, ethnic minorities, and members of the LGBTQ community evolved into important "consumer citizens" in the United States. The second half of the quarter will examine these same social groups from a contemporary perspective, and the degree that globalization, "multiculturalism" and "going green" have emerged as dominant tropes in contemporary culture. By moving from past to present, students will gain an understanding of the complex connections between consumption and U.S. nation-building, as well as the consequences "shopping" and the accumulation of "stuff" has had in both the shaping and reconfiguring understandings of what it means to live the "American Dream." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

German (GERM)
GERM 1416 - German Civilization: History, Politics, and Culture (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1303
Course Description

This course is an introduction to intellectual and cultural currents in German civilization from the Enlightenment to the present, emphasizing the arts in the context of history and philosophy from the late 18th century to around the mid-20th century. Readings include excerpts from such thinkers as Kant, Fichte, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, as well as poetry and short fictional works by Heine, Junger, Remarque, Borchert, and others. The readings are supplemented by films that students are expected to have watched at the beginning of each week. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Greek (GREK)
GREK 1416 - Myths of Greece & Rome (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amCastellani, Victor
CRN: 1301
Course Description

Introduction to the goddesses and gods, heroes and heroines, and not a few monstrosities from popular tradition, literature, and visual arts of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Activities include imaginative and creative assignments. No prerequisite. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

History (HIST)
HIST 1350 - History of the British Empire (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/011:00 pm to 4:40 pmKreider, Jodie
CRN: 1260
Course Description

This course explores the rise and fall of the British Empire from its origins during the English conquests of Wales, Scotland and Ireland; explorations of the world, through commercial expansion under the British East India Company; the rise of Britain as the preeminent world imperial power during the 19th century and its eventual decline and legacy during the late 20th century. Using a variety of secondary articles, primary sources, films and monographs, this course analyzes highly debated issues including the interconnected nature of British society and developments out in the Empire, both cultural and political; the important role that women, gender, and racial ideologies placed in British dominance of one quarter of the globe; how the empire and representations of Empire changed over the century; and finally, the impact of that empire upon issues of identity and population in a post-colonial Britain. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

HIST 1610 - The History of the Crusades: 1095-1300 (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Sciarcon, Jonathan
CRN: 1259
Course Description

This course traces the origins and development of the Crusading movement as well as its impact on Christian, Muslim, and Jewish society in Europe and the Middle East from the 11th through the 14th centuries C.E. This course also examines ideas of Christian/Muslim/Jewish difference in this period. We pay special attention to primary source material. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Japanese (JAPN)
JAPN 1216 - Popular Culture of Japan (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Shaughnessy, Orna
CRN: 1313
Course Description

In this course we examine and analyze the emergence of particular forms of mass-produced culture, or culture for mass consumption, in Japan from the early modern period to the present. Using a variety of cultural materials enjoyed from the early modern period (1600-1868,) during which Japanese society underwent extensive urbanization, secularization, and cultural commodification, through to the present, the course focuses on overarching themes: media and information technology (woodblock printing, newspapers, and the internet); entertainment and gender (the all-male kabuki theatre and all-female Takarazuka revue); commodified romance; fiction (illustrated fiction, manga, and novels); anime and television fandom; healer-bots and cyborgs. No knowledge of Japanese required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

JAPN 1216 - Popular Culture of Japan (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Shaughnessy, Orna
CRN: 1329
Course Description

In this course we examine and analyze the emergence of particular forms of mass-produced culture, or culture for mass consumption, in Japan from the early modern period to the present. Using a variety of cultural materials enjoyed from the early modern period (1600-1868,) during which Japanese society underwent extensive urbanization, secularization, and cultural commodification, through to the present, the course focuses on overarching themes: media and information technology (woodblock printing, newspapers, and the internet); entertainment and gender (the all-male kabuki theatre and all-female Takarazuka revue); commodified romance; fiction (illustrated fiction, manga, and novels); anime and television fandom; healer-bots and cyborgs. No knowledge of Japanese required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Judaic Studies (JUST)
JUST 1610 - The History of the Crusades: 1095-1300 (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Sciarcon, Jonathan
CRN: 1290
Course Description

This course traces the origins and development of the Crusading movement as well as its impact on Christian, Muslim, and Jewish society in Europe and the Middle East from the 11th through the 14th centuries C.E. This course also examines ideas of Christian/Muslim/Jewish difference in this period. We pay special attention to primary source material. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with HIST 1610.

JUST 2202 - New Testament (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Robbins, Gregory
CRN: 1291
Course Description

This course takes a multifaceted approach (historical, literary, and critical) to the writings that comprise the Christian New Testament. The New Testament are read as a collection of primary documents that chronicle the primitive Church's slow and often painful process of self-definition. In these writings it is possible to discern the tension that arose because of the strong religious and cultural ties early Christianity maintained with Palestinian Judaism, from which it emerged as a sectarian or reform movement. The careful reader also finds evidence of the new religion's encounter with the Greco-Roman world from whose variegated ethos and culture it borrowed considerably on the way to becoming an important religious force in the first century. In exploring the New Testament, then, we attempt to recover something of the sense of what it meant to be a Christian in New Testament times. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with RLGS 2202.

Media Film Journalism Studies (MFJS)
MFJS 2000 - Introduction to Film Criticism (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/011:00 pm to 4:20 pmBuxton, Rodney
CRN: 1268
Course Description

Theories and methods of social, cultural and aesthetic criticism of film; emphasis on critical writing. Laboratory fee required. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Music-Academic Classes (MUAC)
MUAC 1017 - History of Rock and Roll (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/011:00 pm to 4:50 pmKireilis, Ramon
CRN: 1145
Course Description

The "birth of rock" occurred in the mid 1950's as a result of the convergence of pop, country and western, and rhythm and blues. This course traces that evolution by way of examining a broad picture of the general flow of those styles and their artists. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Note: Music majors do not receive Common Curriculum credit for this course.

Philosophy (PHIL)
PHIL 2007 - Philosophy and Video Games (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Surber, Jere
CRN: 1124
Course Description

Traditional and novel metaphysical, ethical, political, and aesthetic issues both arising within video games and posed by this still developing medium. No prerequisites. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2144 - 20th-Century Philosophy (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:00 am to 12:20 pmBrent, Michael
CRN: 1474
Course Description

A general overview of prominent 20th-century philosophers and philosophical movements. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2666 - 21st Century Thought about Doomsday, Singularity, and Superintelligence Arguments (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Surber, Jere
CRN: 1363
Course Description

A presentation and discussion of some of the 'exteme' themes of 21st century philosophy, including 'Sensative Conditions,' 'Doomsday Arguments,' 'singularities' involving artifical intelligence, whether we are living in a 'computer simulation,' and the possibility of 'extraterrestrial intelligence' and the issues this raises. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PHIL 2700 - Biomedical Ethics (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M T W R06/13 - 07/089:20 am to 11:50 amBrown, Jeffrey
CRN: 1128
Course Description

Discussion of some of the most pressing ethical issues engaged by contemporary developments in biology and medicine. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Religious Studies (RLGS)
RLGS 2102 - Judaism, Christianity & Islam (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Raschke, Carl
CRN: 1245
Course Description

This course introduces students to the three major monotheistic religious traditions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. In the process of tracing the long and rich histories of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, we examine the beliefs and practices that became central and definitive for Jews, Christians, and Muslims. We begin with the ancient heritage of each religion (scriptures, founders, early institutions). Then we explore how these foundational traditions were preserved and re-invigorated in response to centuries of social change and critical moments of political upheaval. Most significant, in this regard, is the Jewish, Christian, and Muslim encounter with their respective holy Scriptures--as generation after generation of adherents have attempted to understand the revealed words of God, to proclaim their continual relevance for all places and all times and to inscribe them upon their bodies and hearts through prayer, worship, and daily life. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

RLGS 2202 - New Testament (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Robbins, Gregory
CRN: 1246
Course Description

This course takes a multifaceted approach (historical, literary, and critical) to the writings that comprise the Christian New Testament. The New Testament are read as a collection of primary documents that chronicle the primitive Church?s slow and often painful process of self-definition. In these writings it is possible to discern the tension that arose because of the strong religious and cultural ties early Christianity maintained with Palestinian Judaism, from which it emerged as a sectarian or reform movement. The careful reader also finds evidence of the new religion?s encounter with the Greco-Roman world from whose variegated ethos and culture it borrowed considerably on the way to becoming an important religious force in the first century. In exploring the New Testament, then, we attempt to recover something of the sense of what it meant to be a Christian in New Testament times. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with JUST 2202.

Spanish (SPAN)
SPAN 2300 - Iberian Culture & Civilization
Abroad06/25 - 08/19 Torre, Javier
CRN: 1308
Course Description

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

SPAN 2300 - Iberian Culture & Civilization
Abroad06/25 - 08/19 Walter, Susan
CRN: 1309
Course Description

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

Theatre (THEA)
THEA 1810 - The Process of Theatre: Page to Stage
M T W R07/18 - 08/059:20 am to 12:40 pmMcDonald, Steven
CRN: 1140
Course Description

Exploration of the process playwrights, directors, actors, and designers use in creating a theatrical production. Individual sections may focus on single areas only?please see department for current offerings. In this course, students will demonstrate the ability to create or interpret the texts, ideas or artifacts of human culture. They will also identify and analyze the connections between these things and the human experience/perception of the world. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

THEA 2870 - Acting I (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
M W R07/18 - 08/1110:30 am to 1:50 pmBarbour, Frederic
CRN: 1142
Course Description

Exploration of acting through physical and vocal exercises, followed by scene study. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Language

French (FREN)
FREN 1001 - Francais elementaire (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:40 pmWoellner, Terri-Jo
CRN: 1298
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on oral skills; introduction to French and Francophone cultures. First quarter in a three quarter sequence.

FREN 1002 - Francais elementaire (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 12:40 pmGrall-Johnson, Helene
CRN: 1299
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on oral skills; introduction to French and Francophone cultures. Second quarter in a three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: FREN 1001 or equivalent.

FREN 1003 - Francais elementaire (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/119:20 am to 12:40 pmMargolin, Arianne
CRN: 1300
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary with emphasis on oral skills; introduction to French and Francophone cultures. Third quarter in a three quarter sequence. Prerequisite: FREN 1002 or equivalent.

Japanese (JAPN)
JAPN 1001 - Elementary Japanese (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:40 pmXu, Jun
CRN: 1310
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Japanese culture. First quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 1002 - Elementary Japanese (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 12:40 pmXu, Jun
CRN: 1311
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Japanese culture. Second quarter of three quarter sequence.

JAPN 1003 - Elementary Japanese (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/119:20 am to 12:40 pmXu, Jun
CRN: 1312
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills; introduction to Japanese culture. Third quarter of three quarter sequence.

Spanish (SPAN)
SPAN 1001 - Beginning Spanish (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:40 pmLeahy, Chad
CRN: 1305
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1002 - Beginning Spanish (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 12:40 pmCasanas, Oriol
CRN: 1306
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1003 - Beginning Spanish (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/119:20 am to 12:40 pmWoods, Carmen
CRN: 1307
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

Scientific Inquiry: Natural & Physical World

Biology (BIOL)
BIOL 1220 - Molecules to Humankind I (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
T R06/13 - 07/018:00 am to 10:50 amHebel, Angela
M T W R06/13 - 07/0111:00 am to 12:50 pmHebel, Angela
CRN: 1365
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors that examines the mechanisms that sustain life. Emphasis is placed on understanding the human body at the molecular, cellular and physiological levels. In the fall quarter our discussions start with the atom and basic chemistry. We next consider the properties of complex molecules, including DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, in order to see how such molecules are used and organized by living organisms. Our discussions of large and complex molecules lead naturally to the basic unit of life, the cell. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

BIOL 1221 - Molecules to Humankind II (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
T R07/05 - 07/228:00 am to 10:50 amAndrud, Kristin
M T W R07/05 - 07/2211:00 am to 12:50 pmAndrud, Kristin
CRN: 1366
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors begins with an introduction to the general vertebrate body plan; we emphasize the human body plan but also compare it with other vertebrates. Discussions progress through the major organ and physiological systems of the body, including circulatory, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, nervous, skin, immune, reproductive, gastrointestinal, and skeletal and muscle systems. Discussions concentrate on the organization and function of these systems. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

BIOL 1222 - Molecules to Humankind III (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
T R07/25 - 08/118:00 am to 10:50 amMorris, Julie
M T W R07/25 - 08/1111:00 am to 12:50 pmMorris, Julie
CRN: 1367
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence focuses for non-majors on cell biology, genetics, and human reproduction and development. After a review of cell structure and function, focusing on how cells are capable of replication with modification, the mechanisms by which information is passed on from one cell to another and from one generation to the next are considered. The second half of the quarter concerns sexual reproduction and early development. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

Chemistry (CHEM)
CHEM 1010 - General Chemistry (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R F06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 11:20 amMitchell, Deborah
CRN: 1381
Course Description

For natural science and engineering majors. Atomic and molecular structure, reactions in solution, thermochemistry and thermodynamics. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1240.

CHEM 1240 - General Chemistry Lab (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/0112:00 pm to 3:00 pmMitchell, Deborah
CRN: 1382
Course Description

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 1010. Experiments illustrate aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and thermodynamics. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1010.

CHEM 1240 - General Chemistry Lab (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/0112:00 pm to 3:00 pmMitchell, Deborah
CRN: 1383
Course Description

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 1010. Experiments illustrate aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and thermodynamics. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1010.

CHEM 2451 - Organic Chemistry I (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R F07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 11:20 am 
CRN: 1384
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisites: CHEM 1010 and CHEM 1240. Corequisite: CHEM 2461.

CHEM 2452 - Organic Chemistry II (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R F07/25 - 08/119:20 am to 11:20 amCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1385
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: CHEM 2451. Corequisite: CHEM 2462.

CHEM 2461 - Organic Chemistry Lab I (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/2212:00 pm to 3:30 pm 
CRN: 1387
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 2451.

CHEM 2462 - Organic Chemistry Lab II (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/1112:00 pm to 3:30 pmCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1388
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 2452.

Geography (GEOG)
GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/018:10 am to 10:20 amTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1332
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
T W R06/13 - 07/0110:30 am to 12:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1333
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
T W R06/13 - 07/0110:30 am to 12:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1334
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (Full-term session A — June 13-August 11)
Online06/13 - 08/11 Keables, Michael
CRN: 1335
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
T W R06/13 - 07/0112:30 pm to 2:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1971
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R07/05 - 07/228:10 am to 10:20 amKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1336
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
T W R07/05 - 07/2210:30 am to 12:20 pmKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1337
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
T W R07/05 - 07/2210:30 am to 12:20 pmKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1338
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/118:10 am to 10:20 amKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1339
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201 and GEOG 1203.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
T W R07/25 - 08/1110:30 am to 12:20 pmKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1340
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201 and GEOG 1203.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
T W R07/25 - 08/1110:30 am to 12:20 pmKuzera, Kristopher
CRN: 1341
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisite: GEOG 1201 and GEOG 1203.

Physics & Astronomy (PHYS)
PHYS 1111 - General Physics I (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M T W R F07/05 - 07/229:20 am to 12:20 pmIona, Steven
CRN: 1230
Course Description

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students in any Natural Science and Mathematics field of study. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Algebra and trigonometry are used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. Students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214. Lab fee associated with this course.

PHYS 1111 - General Physics I (3-week session E — July 5-July 22)
M W F07/05 - 07/221:00 pm to 3:00 pmIona, Steven
CRN: 1231
Course Description

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students in any Natural Science and Mathematics field of study. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Algebra and trigonometry are used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. Students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214. Lab fee associated with this course.

Scientific Inquiry: Society & Culture Writing & Rhetoric

Communication (COMN)
COMN 1210 - Foundations of Communication Studies (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Foust, Christina
CRN: 1130
Course Description

This course offers students an introduction to the study of communication. Students will explore the role of communication in domains that cut across the spectrum of human social life, from communication among individuals, to relationships, to marriage and families, to groups, to organizations, to communication at societal and global levels. In addition to focusing on the specific nature of communication in these distinct settings, students learn as well the different conceptual models for describing and understanding communication across these settings. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Economics (ECON)
ECON 1020 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics I: History and Theories (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Cole, Paula
CRN: 1292
Course Description

This course presents an introductory analysis of how the economic aspects of our society operate. We begin with a brief examination of the development of human economic arrangements and how these developed into the kind of economy we have today. We then look at some of the historical development of how people thought that economic activity works and how they thought it should work. Then we go into an examination of the workings of markets and economic competition--what we call micro-economics--by examining some of the relevant theory as well as its embodiment in developments in the U.S. economy. Following that, we examine in much more detail the theory and some current issues involved in what we call macro-economics--the study of the workings of the national economy as a whole, with its concerns to explain such matters as the national rates of unemployment and price inflation, along with a study of the monetary and financial aspects of the economy and the promises and problems of gender from many different directions. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

ECON 1020 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics I: History and Theories (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Zuchegno, Daniel
CRN: 1297
Course Description

This course presents an introductory analysis of how the economic aspects of our society operate. We begin with a brief examination of the development of human economic arrangements and how these developed into the kind of economy we have today. We then look at some of the historical development of how people thought that economic activity works and how they thought it should work. Then we go into an examination of the workings of markets and economic competition--what we call micro-economics--by examining some of the relevant theory as well as its embodiment in developments in the U.S. economy. Following that, we examine in much more detail the theory and some current issues involved in what we call macro-economics--the study of the workings of the national economy as a whole, with its concerns to explain such matters as the national rates of unemployment and price inflation, along with a study of the monetary and financial aspects of the economy and the promises and problems of gender from many different directions. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Gender and Women's Studies (GWST)
GWST 1112 - Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Feitz, Lindsey
CRN: 1282
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of gender and women's studies. All cultures engage in a complex process of assigning cultural values and social roles which vary according to the cultural environment in which human interaction occurs. Among these, the process of translating biological differences into a complex system of gender remains one of the most important. Gender and women's studies aims to understand how this process of 'gendering' occurs, and its larger effects in society. This course also explores how this system of meaning relates to other systems of allocating power, including socioeconomic class, social status, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and nationality. Using this lens, this course explores contemporary social developments and problems. Gender and women's studies is about studying, but it is also about meaningful engagement with the world. This class presents students with a variety of types of texts from sociological articles to literary fictions and documentary and fictional cinema to explore gender from many different directions. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

GWST 1112 - Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Feitz, Lindsey
CRN: 1284
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of gender and women's studies. All cultures engage in a complex process of assigning cultural values and social roles which vary according to the cultural environment in which human interaction occurs. Among these, the process of translating biological differences into a complex system of gender remains one of the most important. Gender and women's studies aims to understand how this process of 'gendering' occurs, and its larger effects in society. This course also explores how this system of meaning relates to other systems of allocating power, including socioeconomic class, social status, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and nationality. Using this lens, this course explores contemporary social developments and problems. Gender and women's studies is about studying, but it is also about meaningful engagement with the world. This class presents students with a variety of types of texts from sociological articles to literary fictions and documentary and fictional cinema to explore gender from many different directions. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Geography (GEOG)
GEOG 1410 - People, Places & Landscapes (3-week session F — July 25-August 11)
M T W R07/25 - 08/111:00 pm to 4:20 pmTaylor, Matthew
CRN: 1342
Course Description

In this course, students will study the location of people and activities across the surface of the Earth. Describing the locations and patterns of human activity only lays the foundation for exploring how and why such patterns have developed historically, and how they relate to the natural environment and other aspects of human behavior. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Media Film Journalism Studies (MFJS)
MFJS 2210 - Introduction to Media and Culture (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Liberman, Rachael
CRN: 1270
Course Description

Course introduces students to the organization of the U.S. media industries and their historical and contemporary role in U.S. culture. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Psychology (PSYC)
PSYC 1001 - Foundations of Psychological Science (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Miller, Pamela
CRN: 1331
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of mind and behavior. It includes topics such as the biological basis of behavior, the developmental transitions from infancy through old age, the principles underlying perception, learning and memory, and the ways in which behavior is affected by its physical, social, and cultural context. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

PSYC 1001 - Foundations of Psychological Science (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Miller, Pamela
CRN: 1922
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of mind and behavior. It includes topics such as the biological basis of behavior, the developmental transitions from infancy through old age, the principles underlying perception, learning and memory, and the ways in which behavior is affected by its physical, social, and cultural context. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Public Policy (PPOL)
PPOL 2710 - Demography of Public Policy
Online06/13 - 07/18 Salucci, Lapo
CRN: 1327
Course Description

"Demography is destiny." The consequences for American public policy are profound. America is aging, but becoming more diverse. A society in the midst of dynamic change is a society full of possibilities, but vulnerable to conflict. Values become indeterminate, with traditional communities vying for legitimacy with emergent cultures. Social movements, often populist in nature, challenge the established political order. This course focuses on the delineation of effective public policies to deal with demographic challenges, including (1) immigration policy; (2) the process of assimilation; (3) education; (4) geographic realignment; (5) competitive advantage of the United States relative to the European Union, Russia, and China. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Sociology (SOCI)
SOCI 1810 - Understanding Social Life (3-week session D — June 13-July 1)
M T W R06/13 - 07/019:20 am to 12:50 pmColomy, Paul
CRN: 1232
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the discipline of sociology and to the insights it provides into the human condition. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

SOCI 1810 - Understanding Social Life
M T W R07/18 - 08/051:00 pm to 4:30 pmNguyen-Perez, Raul
CRN: 1364
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the discipline of sociology and to the insights it provides into the human condition. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.

Writing

Writing (WRIT)
WRIT 1122 - Rhetoric and Academic Writing (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Stacks, Geoffrey
CRN: 1739
Course Description

On completing this course, students are expected to have enhanced the following knowledge and skills: analytic and critical reading strategies; a basic understanding of rhetorical situations and rhetorical analysis; the ability to write for specific audiences and discourse communities, using effective conversations for these situations; the ability to write texts that are organized, coherent and substantive, demonstrating rhetorical, linguistic design and analytical competence. The course provides instruction and practice in academic and civic writing for well-educated readers. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as additional exercises. Final portfolio.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
M W F06/13 - 07/0810:00 am to 1:20 pmSinger, Daniel
CRN: 1740
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
Online07/18 - 08/11 Benz, Bradley
CRN: 1741
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session B — June 13-July 8)
Online06/13 - 07/08 Tiedemann, John
CRN: 1742
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

WRIT 2050 - Style and Rhetorical Grammar (4-week session C — July 18-August 11)
M T W07/18 - 08/111:00 pm to 3:00 pmParrish, Juli
CRN: 1744
Course Description

"Be concise. Don't split infinitives. Write with flow. Don't end a sentence with a preposition. Avoid the passive voice. Never use "I" in academic writing." Everyone has these maxims about writing and grammar. This course will interrogate those maxims, and provide systematic ways to draft, revise, and polish prose based on the needs and demands of the audience. More specifically, students consider matters of sentence structure and sentence rhythm, cohesion and concision, as well as voice and point of view. Through a series of shorter and longer writing assignments, in-class exercises and activities, and course readings, students hone their writing and grammar skills, all with the goal of writing with improved clarity and grace. The course is open to all students who want to take their writing to a next level of sophistication, clarity, and range. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122 or permission of instructor.