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SUMMER@DU

Students in the classroom

Summer @ DU

Courses

Plan ahead and browse our full list of undergraduate summer courses. (For graduate courses, see the online course schedule on webCentral.) You can find a detailed description of each class under the course name.

Current students can register through webCentralVisiting students from other colleges and universities can register by contacting the Office of the Registrar.

Please note: These course listings are based on the most recent information available. They're subject to change with enrollment.

About online courses

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Accounting (ACTG)
ACTG 2010 - Survey of Accounting (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Brothers, Douglas
CRN: 1029
Course Description

Accounting for running a business, with modules on financial accounting and a focus on managerial accounting. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing. Business minors only.

ACTG 2200 - Introduction to Financial Reporting (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/1410:30 am to 12:40 pmMorton, Jane
CRN: 1055
Course Description

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to accounting and its relevance in the business world. Students learn how to analyze transactions and prepare financial statements. In addition, students are introduced to publicly traded company's annual reports and 10k's. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 1.

ACTG 2300 - Accounting for Decision Making (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/141:00 pm to 3:10 pmHarrison, Paul
CRN: 1030
Course Description

Introduces or reinforces concepts and techniques for using accounting information for managerial purposes. The focus is on interpreting financial information and making business decisions, not accumulating or preparing accounting information. Prerequisites: degree checkpoint 1 and ACTG 2200.

ACTG 3220 - Understanding Financial Statements (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/1410:30 am to 12:40 pmHarrison, Paul
CRN: 1535
Course Description

Provides business majors with the necessary understanding to read, interpret, and use published financial statements. Cross listed with ACTG 4222. Prerequisites: ACTG 2200 and degree checkpoint 1.

ACTG 3230 - Financial Statement Analysis (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/145:30 pm to 7:40 pmGrove, Hugh
CRN: 1031
Course Description

Consolidated financial statements, accounting for leases, currency translation, and options and futures impacts, GAAP to restate financial statements for differences between companies. Impact of financial transactions and evaluating a firm's performance from a user's perspective. Cross listed with ACTG 4220. Prerequisites: ACTG 3220 and degree checkpoint 2.

ACTG 3440 - Business and Investment Tax Issues (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/1410:30 am to 12:40 pmTripp, John
CRN: 1096
Course Description

Income tax conceptual framework applicable to common business and investment transactions, including tax implications of business decisions. How effective business planning depends on accurate assessment of relevant tax factors. Prerequisites: ACTG 2200 and degree checkpoint 1.

ACTG 3462 - Corporate & Partnership Tax (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/141:00 pm to 3:10 pmTripp, John
CRN: 1035
Course Description

Federal income tax as applied to the formation, operation and dissolution of business entities. Determination of corporate taxable income, special deductions, credits, methods of computing tax liability and estimated tax requirements. Determination of partnership and S Corporation ordinary income; classification and amount of separately stated items allocable to partners and S Corporation shareholders in accordance with the conduit principle. Prerequisites: degree checkpoint 2 and ACTG 3036 or ACTG 3440.

Advanced Seminar (ASEM)
ASEM 2460 - Latina/o Religious Traditions (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M T W R06/16 - 07/111:00 pm to 4:30 pmLeon, Luis
CRN: 1066
Course Description

This course is organized around the broad question: Is there enough commonality in the texts (including cultural texts) we have studied to organize and name a singular field of social relations we can rightly call "Lainta/o Religion?" This course engages and excites students by enabling them to study religious traditions in an academic place removed from direct faith commitments. Toward this end, we will view art, hear music, watch films and talk to religious leaders.

ASEM 2482 - Africa (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1945
Course Description

In this course, we study the literature, politics and culture of Africa from pre-colonial times to the present. We begin by examining Africa as the locus of the world's oldest civilization and by discussing some key moments in African history. We then focus on the four regions of Africa, on country- or region-based examples of culture and politics in Africa--such as colonial rule in East Africa, war of independence in North Africa, military rule in West Africa, Apartheid in Southern Africa. We also discuss Africa and the world, or Africa in the context of modern-day globalization. In each case, we discuss historical accounts and literary representations as well as political and cultural contexts.

ASEM 2509 - Communication and Production of Cultures (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Hao, Richie Neil
CRN: 1224
Course Description

Profound changes in the last two decades on the global, national and local scales have brought about a collapse in people?s traditional sources of self-definition, notably those ethnic, racial, geographic, sexual and national bases of group belonging and identity. Given such undermining of the old certainties, answers to the question "Who am I?" have become more tenuous, if not totally "up for grabs." Fragmentation of identities, ethnic conflict, social alienation and a loss of a sense of grounding are only some of the noted hallmarks of the present time. This course is designed to address the implications of this shift in signification--from identity to difference--for the dynamics of identity formation and the search for alternative bases for consensus-formation in the new millennium.

ASEM 2526 - Communication in Close Relationships (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Serewicz, Mary
CRN: 1225
Course Description

Communication in Close Relationships emphasizes the relationship between the self and others at a personal level. We examine research from a variety of disciplines, including communication, psychology, sociology, family studies and history, to increase our understanding of relationships from diverse perspectives. The three main perspectives we investigate show how relationships affect and are affected by their context, the individuals involved and the relational system. The goals of this course are for students to increase their understanding of relationships from diverse perspectives; evaluate critically the information about relationships that we encounter in our everyday lives; ask and investigate questions about real-life relationships; and communicate insights into communication and relationships in a variety of formats.

ASEM 2529 - Analyzing the American Dream - Expressionist Film in 1950's Hollywood (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Gault, James
CRN: 1087
Course Description

This course focuses on the output of a few Hollywood directors (primarily Ida Lupino, Nicholas Ray and Douglas Sirk) who seem to reflect the dominant ideologies of post-war Hollywood. On the surface, their films celebrate middle-class success, a simple American can-do attitude and, most important for this class, characters who seem to reestablish pre-war expectations of femininity and masculinity. Rules of femininity, masculinity and sexuality are a constant focus for these directors, and each has his or her own approach to exploring the repercussions of strict gender assignment.

ASEM 2576 - Art, Thought, Spirituality (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Raschke, Carl
CRN: 1067
Course Description

This course examines the close and complex relationship between esthetic expression and private religiosity, or "spirituality." The course will examine how theories as well as personal accounts of artistic creativity, experience and appreciation can both broaden and deepen our understanding of the inner life that is otherwise communicated in religious terms and how artistic expression can also have a quasi-religious or "spiritual" character. The central objective will be to illumine the way in which the construction of the individual self and the formation of the personal identity are intimately tied to different quests that are artistic and spiritual at once.

ASEM 2577 - Cultural Intersections (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1895
Course Description

In this course, we explore the dynamics of cultural reception or the translational dimension of modern culture, particularly the reception of narratives within particular cultures and beyond. Our main focus is the principles that integrate and divide people along the lines of race, class, ethnicity and culture. Our journey involves studies of cultural contacts, contexts and narratives from Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas.

ASEM 2579 - From Literature to Film (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1277
Course Description

In this course, we examine the adaptation of literary works into films. We closely study selected modern literary works and the film interpretations of each work. Focusing on the transition from one narrative form to another, the course enhances the critical skill of students as well as their creative ability with respect to cinematic translations. We, therefore, also have mini scriptwriting workshops as a way of imaginatively highlighting the sort of considerations that go into the making of the film script.

ASEM 2581 - Forgiveness, Politics and Film (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M W R07/21 - 08/1410:30 am to 2:10 pmWadsworth, Nancy
CRN: 1246
Course Description

This course covers a number of reconciliation frameworks that have been employed as transformative and peacemaking strategies in various interpersonal, social and political contexts. We discuss the value (and limitations) of core reconciliation concepts, see how they have been used productively, and consider their possible application to ongoing problems in the world today.

ASEM 2596 - Politics of Reconciliation (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Sun, Jing
CRN: 1247
Course Description

This class addresses the national and international efforts to seek justice and achieve reconciliation. It examines how state and non-state actors reflect on an unfortunate or hostile past with a designated "other": how did their relations and interactions with this targeted "other" go wrong? What were the material, philosophical and emotional grounds to breed such hostilities? What were the consequences? Has the memory of the "past self" and "past others" shaped the way the two groups interact today? Why do some actors refuse to say "sorry," and why do some victims refuse to forgive? What are the similarities and differences among various reconciliation projects? In this class, we lead students to explore these challenging yet exciting questions.

ASEM 2609 - Literature of Nature and Apocalypse (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Stratton, Billy
CRN: 1278
Course Description

Concern about the declining state of the environment has been a topic of longstanding interest, from Henry David Thoreau to John Muir, and writers like Edward Abbey, Ernest Callenbach, Louise Erdrich, T.C. Boyle, Octavia Burtler, Cormac McCarthy and others. This writing intensive course examines questions relating to environmental activism and social structures predicated upon technological and materialist culture. It considers how American writers have reassessed the relation between religious beliefs and notions of utopia and apocalypse. It examines and analyzes timely and relevant historical, literary, and philosophical issues relating to the current state of the environment.

ASEM 2641 - Globalization from Above and Below (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Gordon, Hava
CRN: 1259
Course Description

This course provides a unique and challenging opportunity for students to clarify the concept of globalization by exploring parallel and interesting forces "from above and below." This course draws widely from international studies, economics, political science, sociology, environmental studies, and feminist theory to examine processes of global social change and conflict. Through academic theorizing and activist writings, the course familiarizes students with some of the landmark debates on globalization. Completion of all Common Curriculum requirements is required prior to registering for this class.

ASEM 2657 - Harry Potter and Esotericism
M T W R07/21 - 08/078:10 am to 11:20 amWarlick, M.
CRN: 1251
Course Description

Today's students have grown up with J. K. Rowling's seven Harry Potter books. This incredible publishing phenomenon has inspired children and adults alike to devour 500-page books within days of publication, at a time when statistics seem to indicate that people are no longer reading. Why would these tales of English school children learning a curriculum of magical skills have so captured the imagination of a generation of young people living in a post-modern world? The purpose of this class then is to examine the role of esoteric themes that pervade the Harry Potter books and to investigate the history of those subjects from the Middle Ages to the present, by focusing on the visual traditions they inspired. Areas discussed include the history of magic and witchcraft, classical and Celtic mythology, alchemy, astrology, fantastic beasts, "books of secrets" and their healing potions, the mythic lore of botany, divination and various esoteric paths of enlightenment.

ASEM 2660 - Cinematic Storytelling (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Henry, Elizabeth
CRN: 1088
Course Description

The course acquaints students with basic concepts and methods used in the analysis of stories, the theoretical assumptions and models describing and justifying those concepts and models, and practical applications of story analysis in cinematic and script form. We begin with Aristotle, provide an interdisciplinary and historical overview of narratology, move to literary narrative analysis, and then focus on film-theoretical approaches while gaining practical skills in analysis of the elements of storytelling in fiction, film and television. In this way, students gain some historical perspectives on the form and function of story - its timeless prevalence as well as its more current iterations.

ASEM 2666 - Murder in America
M T W R06/16 - 07/031:00 pm to 4:30 pmPasko, Lisa
CRN: 1260
Course Description

This course draws on research from several perspectives in order to examine: (1) the definitions, scope, consequences and historical trends of homicide in America over the last century, including a case study investigation of why the murder rate dropped dramatically in New York City by the late 1990s; (2) past and current sociological/cultural and psychological explanations for lethal violence, including an in-depth look at serial, mass and spree killers; (3) crime policies and techniques aimed at reducing lethal violence, which entails a critical look at Three Strikes and You're Out laws aimed at violent offenders; and (4) media representations of homicide defendants and victims.

ASEM 2695 - Religion and Politics in China (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Willock, Nicole
CRN: 1065
Course Description

This course explores the concept of "religion" in the political history of modern China. Students gain new insight into two concurrent and divergent historical processes--state-driven secularization and religious revival--in China and Taiwan. Completion of all Common Curriculum requirements is required prior to registering for this class.

ASEM 2720 - Nazi Germany: History, Literature, Culture (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1460
Course Description

This course explores Germany's Nazi era. It focuses on themes like redemption, temptation, national community, conflict and memory while analyzing both texts and visuals from and related to the period. Prerequisite: Completion of all other Common Curriculum Requirements.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1707
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1977
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

Anthropology (ANTH)
ANTH 3990 - Summer Field School-Archaeology
Off-Site06/16 - 07/166:00 am to 4:00 pmClark, Bonnie,
Amati, Anne
CRN: 1402
Course Description

Archaeological excavation, survey and recordings; analysis and conservation of artifacts in the field.

Art - Studio (ARTS)
ARTS 1250 - Drawing
M T W R F06/30 - 07/119:20 am to 4:10 pmHoward, Deborah
CRN: 1456
Course Description

Fundamental drawing practice and history based on selected exercises, slide presentations, comprehensive group/individual critiques and workshops. Still-life and figure drawing are covered in this course. Projects focus on ways to comprehend and draw three-dimensional forms, with emphasis on conceptual issues and use of materials. This class is required of all majors in studio art prior to taking upper-level courses. It is also required of all EDP students. Recommended prerequisites: ARTS 1100 and ARTS 1200.

ARTS 2045 - Intermediate Drawing (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M T W R F06/30 - 07/119:20 am to 4:10 pmHoward, Deborah
CRN: 1980
Course Description

This course covers a wide range of materials and ideas, both traditional and experimental. Emphasis is divided between technical and conceptual issues, building on the skills established in ARTS 1250 Drawing. Lab fee. Prerequisite: ARTS 1250 or permission of instructor.

ARTS 2415 - Introduction to Photography
M T W R F07/21 - 08/019:20 am to 4:10 pmMacInnes, Roderick
CRN: 1249
Course Description

This course approaches the medium of photography as a fine art. Fundamental techniques in traditional black and white photography, as well as digital photographic image making, are covered. Topics include camera operation, exposure, film developing, film and print scanning, and traditional and digital printing. Projects are viewed and discussed in group critique sessions. Students must have a camera with manual metering capabilities. Lab fee. Art majors must complete ARTS 1250 and ARTS 1300 first.

ARTS 3701 - Topics in Art: Photography, Geology and Archeology in Scotland
U M T W R F S06/09 - 06/189:00 am to 5:00 pmMacInnes, Roderick
CRN: 1009
Course Description

Selected topics in advanced studio art research. Course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits. Lab fee. Prerequisite: instructor's permission.

Art History (ARTH)
ARTH 1070 - Artists on Film
M T W R06/16 - 07/038:10 am to 11:20 amWarlick, M.
CRN: 1455
Course Description

Artists with turbulent lives have often captured the popular imagination. Typically, novels, plays and films about such artists perpetuate myths of tormented souls overcoming hardships, enduring romantic catastrophes and struggling with their creative genius. Usually, the reality is quite different as an artist's path is one of developing talent, hard work, persistence and great personal courage. This class explores the lives and works of several famous artists. We evaluate the myths and the realities of their lives by comparing their art to films and documentaries that have been made about them.

ARTH 3701 - Topics in Art History: Tibet on Display: "Collecting/Viewing" Tibet in NYC
U M T W R F S08/15 - 08/219:00 am to 5:00 pmMagnatta, Sarah
CRN: 1011
Course Description

Selected themes and topics from the history of art. Content changes and course may be repeated to a maximum of 12 credits.

Biology (BIOL)
BIOL 1010 - Physiological Systems
M T W R07/07 - 07/2511:00 am to 1:50 pmMcIsaac, Hugh
CRN: 1158
Course Description

The second required course in the introductory biology sequence required for students majoring in Biology or another science. Emphasis on physiology and development of plants and animals. Must be a declared science major or biology minor. Co-requisite: BIOL 1020 lab section.

BIOL 1011 - Evolution, Heredity and Biodiversity
M T W R06/16 - 07/0311:00 am to 1:50 pmMorris, Julie
CRN: 1152
Course Description

The first required courses in the introductory biology sequence required for students majoring in Biology or another science. Emphasis on evolution, basic genetics and inheritance, and biodiversity. Must be a declared science major or biology minor. Co-requisite: BIOL 1021 lab section.

BIOL 1020 - Physiological Systems Lab
T R07/07 - 07/258:00 am to 10:50 amHebel, Angela
CRN: 1159
Course Description

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: BIOL 1010 lecture section.

BIOL 1021 - Evolution, Heredity and Biodiversity Lab
T R06/16 - 07/038:00 am to 10:50 amHebel, Angela
CRN: 1153
Course Description

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: BIOL 1011 lecture section.

BIOL 1220 - Molecules to Humankind I
T R06/16 - 07/038:00 am to 10:50 amHebel, Angela,
Andrud, Kristin
M T W R06/16 - 07/0311:00 am to 12:50 pmHebel, Angela,
Andrud, Kristin
CRN: 1151
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors that examines the mechanisms that sustain life. Emphasis is placed on understanding the human body at the molecular, cellular and physiological levels. In the fall quarter our discussions start with the atom and basic chemistry. We next consider the properties of complex molecules, including DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, in order to see how such molecules are used and organized by living organisms. Our discussions of large and complex molecules lead naturally to the basic unit of life, the cell. Lab fee associated with this course.

BIOL 1221 - Molecules to Humankind II
T R07/07 - 07/258:00 am to 10:50 amAndrud, Kristin
M T W R07/07 - 07/2511:00 am to 12:50 pmAndrud, Kristin
CRN: 1157
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors begins with an introduction to the general vertebrate body plan; we emphasize the human body plan but also compare it with other vertebrates. Discussions progress through the major organ and physiological systems of the body, including circulatory, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, nervous, skin, immune, reproductive, gastrointestinal, and skeletal and muscle systems. Discussions concentrate on the organization and function of these systems. Lab fee associated with this course.

BIOL 1222 - Molecules to Humankind III (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
T R07/28 - 08/148:00 am to 10:50 amMorris, Julie,
Andrud, Kristin
M T W R07/28 - 08/1411:00 am to 12:50 pmMorris, Julie,
Andrud, Kristin
CRN: 1160
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence focuses for non-majors on cell biology, genetics, and human reproduction and development. After a review of cell structure and function, focusing on how cells are capable of replication with modification, the mechanisms by which information is passed on from one cell to another and from one generation to the next are considered. The second half of the quarter concerns sexual reproduction and early development. Lab fee associated with this course.

BIOL 2090 - Biostatistics (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Fogleman, James
CRN: 1204
Course Description

Statistics in biological research. Computer-aided statistical analysis and hypothesis testing focusing on experiments and data unique to the biological sciences. Cross listed with BIOL 4090.

BIOL 2120 - Cell Structure and Function
M T W R06/16 - 07/0311:00 am to 1:50 pmLorenzon, Nancy
CRN: 1154
Course Description

Chemical composition of cells; structure and function of cell organelles; interrelationship of cellular unit with its environment; mechanisms of energy conversion within cells; functions of excitability, contractility and cell growth. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010, BIOL 1011 or BIOL 1220, BIOL 1221. Corequisite: BIOL 2121 lab section. CHEM 1010 prerequisite or corequisite.

BIOL 2121 - Cell Structure & Function Lab
T R06/16 - 07/038:00 am to 10:50 amAndrud, Kristin
CRN: 1155
Course Description

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: BIOL 2120.

BIOL 2200 - Medical Terminology (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Sadler, Susan
CRN: 1161
Course Description

This course presents fundamentals and applications of medical terminology using online learning modules and assessment. This review and application of human anatomy and physiology is suitable for students who have completed introductory biology (BIOL 1010 or its equivalent) and who are working toward a career in medicine or for whom communication with health care providers is essential. Students study basic anatomy and physiology at a level that is intermediate between introductory and advanced courses, discover the medical history behind medical terminology, analyze medical case studies, and work to develop skills for clear and concise articulation of the basic concepts of anatomy and physiology behind medical diagnosis and treatment. This mastery of medical terminology helps to build a strong foundation for advanced coursework in anatomy and physiology. Prerequisite: BIOL 1010 or equivalent with instructor approval.

BIOL 3010 - Evolution and Speciation (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Platt, James
CRN: 1009
Course Description

Theories and supporting evidence explaining evolution from origin of universe to complex interrelationships of species. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010, BIOL 1011 and BIOL 2510.

BIOL 3110 - Special Topics: Biostatistics Online
Online08/15 - 08/30 Fogleman, James
CRN: 1015
Course Description

Topics of special interest to teaching/research faculty of department presented as needed to complement and expand existing curriculum. May be repeated for credit.

BIOL 3250 - Human Physiology
M T W R06/16 - 07/1810:30 am to 12:20 pmSadler, Susan,
Hebel, Angela
T R06/16 - 07/181:00 pm to 4:00 pmSadler, Susan,
Hebel, Angela
CRN: 1156
Course Description

Functional relationships of human organ systems with coordinated laboratory activities and experiments that demonstrate and test physiological principles. Lab fee associated with this course. Prerequisites: BIOL 1010, BIOL 1011.

Business Core (BUS)
BUS 1000 - Gateway to Business (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Dumas, Stacy
CRN: 1010
Course Description

Practical glimpse into the global and competitive nature of business. From product ideation to product development, this course introduces students to business's role in society in promoting sustainability as the only successful business model for delivering value to customers and stakeholders of all kinds. Key business activities such as marketing, finance and accounting, working in team, and product/service innovation and creativity are introduced. No prerequisites.

BUS 3700 - Tpcs: Global Business (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
S07/21 - 08/148:00 am to 12:00 pmGnuse, Robert
Online07/21 - 08/14 Gnuse, Robert
CRN: 1943
BUS 3700 - Tpcs: Int'l Negotiation
 08/15 - 08/30 Chung, James
CRN: 1014
Business Ethics &Legal Studies (LGST)
LGST 2000 - Foundations of Business Law (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M06/16 - 06/1611:00 am to 1:00 pmHolt, Paula
Online06/16 - 08/14 Holt, Paula
Online06/28 - 06/2811:00 am to 5:00 pmHolt, Paula
R08/14 - 08/1411:00 am to 1:00 pmHolt, Paula
CRN: 1449
Course Description

Managerial perspective on the role of law and its relationship to business environment; emphasis on American legal system (history of law, courts and civil procedure), private law (business torts, contracts, corporate responsibilities and business ethics), and governmental intervention (constitutional law, employment law, white collar criminal law and corporate/securities law). Prerequisites: BUS 1000 and sophomore standing.

Business Information&Analytics (INFO)
INFO 1010 - Analytics I: Data Management and Analysis (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Baltzan, Paige
CRN: 1489
Course Description

The amount of data businesses are able to maintain and process is growing exponentially, and the ability to manage that data successfully can give a business a tremendous competitive advantage. This course introduces the student to the business data landscape, as well as basic data management and analysis skills through spreadsheet and database applications. Student projects focus on data collection, data cleansing and mining, statistical and graphical analysis, basic modeling, and written presentation skills. No prerequisites.

INFO 1020 - Analytics II: Business Statistics and Analysis (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Anderson, Elizabeth
CRN: 1491
Course Description

Businesses can never have perfect information; therefore, they must employ statistical techniques to improve the decision-making process. This course introduces students to the basic tenets of probability and statistics, with an emphasis on business applications. Statistical models as decision-support tools are taught. Student projects focus on data collection, data analysis, decision analysis, and written presentation skills. Prerequisites: INFO 1010, MATH 1200, or MATH 1951 and MOS Excel certification.

INFO 1020 - Analytics II: Business Statistics and Analysis (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Anderson, Elizabeth
CRN: 1892
Course Description

Businesses can never have perfect information; therefore, they must employ statistical techniques to improve the decision-making process. This course introduces students to the basic tenets of probability and statistics, with an emphasis on business applications. Statistical models as decision-support tools are taught. Student projects focus on data collection, data analysis, decision analysis, and written presentation skills. Prerequisites: INFO 1010, MATH 1200, or MATH 1951 and MOS Excel certification.

INFO 2020 - Analytics III: Business Modeling and Analysis (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Dumas, Stacy
CRN: 1492
Course Description

Businesses make decisions and improve processes using a variety of modeling and analytic techniques. This course introduces the student to the techniques of multiple regression analysis, time series analysis, optimization, and simulation for solving a variety of business problems. Applications include economic forecasting, supply chain management, and project management. Student projects focus on using spreadsheet modeling for problem solving, and emphasizes written and oral presentation techniques. Prerequisites: INFO 1020, degree checkpoint 1 and all MOS certifications.

Chemistry (CHEM)
CHEM 1010 - General Chemistry
M T W R F06/16 - 07/039:20 am to 11:20 amSwanson, Michael
CRN: 1094
Course Description

For natural science and engineering majors. Atomic and molecular structure, reactions in solution, thermochemistry and thermodynamics. Co-requisite: CHEM 1240.

CHEM 1240 - General Chemistry Lab
M T W R06/16 - 07/0312:00 pm to 3:00 pmMiller, Keith
CRN: 1095
Course Description

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 1010. Experiments illustrate aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and thermodynamics. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1010.

CHEM 1240 - General Chemistry Lab
M T W R06/16 - 07/0312:00 pm to 3:00 pmMiller, Keith
CRN: 1113
Course Description

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 1010. Experiments illustrate aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and thermodynamics. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1010.

CHEM 2451 - Organic Chemistry I
M T W R F07/07 - 07/259:20 am to 11:20 amCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1103
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. Prerequisites: CHEM 1010 and CHEM 1240. Corequisite: CHEM 2461.

CHEM 2452 - Organic Chemistry II (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R F07/28 - 08/149:20 am to 11:20 amCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1104
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. Prerequisite: CHEM 2451. Corequisite: CHEM 2462.

CHEM 2453 - Organic Chemistry III
M T W R F06/16 - 07/039:20 am to 11:20 amMurugaverl, Balasingam
CRN: 1105
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. Prerequisite: CHEM 2452. Corequisite: CHEM 2463.

CHEM 2461 - Organic Chemistry Lab I
M T W R07/07 - 07/2512:00 pm to 3:30 pmCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1106
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2451.

CHEM 2462 - Organic Chemistry Lab II (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/1412:00 pm to 3:30 pmCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1107
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2452.

CHEM 2462 - Organic Chemistry Lab II (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/1412:00 pm to 3:30 pm 
CRN: 1108
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2452.

CHEM 2463 - Organic Chemistry Lab III
M T W R06/16 - 07/0312:00 pm to 3:30 pmMurugaverl, Balasingam
CRN: 1109
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2453.

CHEM 2463 - Organic Chemistry Lab III
M T W R06/16 - 07/0312:00 pm to 3:30 pmMurugaverl, Balasingam
CRN: 1110
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2453.

CHEM 3811 - Biochemistry-Proteins
M T W R F06/16 - 07/039:20 am to 11:20 amWells, Todd
CRN: 1111
Course Description

Protein structure and function, starting with the building blocks and forces that drive the formation of protein structure and the basic concepts of protein structure, and continuing with enzyme catalysis, kinetics, and regulation. Prerequisites: CHEM 2453 and CHEM 2011, or instructor permission.

Communication (COMN)
COMN 1100 - Communication in Personal Relationships (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
R06/19 - 06/196:00 pm to 9:50 pmReyes, Kristine
R08/14 - 08/146:00 pm to 9:50 pmReyes, Kristine
CRN: 1540
Course Description

Relationships have a direct and lasting impact on us: they shape who we are, and the paths we take toward who we will become. The purpose of this course is to analyze and apply theories and research relevant to communication processes in a variety of personal relationships. Discussion of issues such as attachment, identity, hetero- and homosexual relationships, family communication, conflict, and intrapersonal discourses will provide students a foundation on which to build skills useful in a variety of personal relationships. In Communication in Personal Relationships, students will: sensitively express attitudes and discuss research about different issues pertinent to the study of personal relationships; develop the skills to critically analyze their own relationships and the relationships of others; reflect on and challenge their and others' ideas in a critically constructive manner so that we arrive at a new level of understanding together; and demonstrate the ability to apply communication and interpersonal theories and research outside of this classroom upon completion of the course.

COMN 1210 - Foundations of Communication Studies (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Foust, Christina
CRN: 1527
Course Description

This course offers students an introduction to the study of communication. Students will explore the role of communication in domains that cut across the spectrum of human social life, from communication among individuals, to relationships, to marriage and families, to groups, to organizations, to communication at societal and global levels. In addition to focusing on the specific nature of communication in these distinct settings, students learn as well the different conceptual models for describing and understanding communication across these settings.

COMN 2210 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1219
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: What is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, we explore how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities "from the ground up." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with GWST 2212.

COMN 2210 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1220
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: What is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, we explore how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities "from the ground up." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with GWST 2212.

COMN 2220 - Race and Popular Culture (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Calafell, Bernadette
CRN: 1221
Course Description

This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality.

COMN 2220 - Race and Popular Culture (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Calafell, Bernadette
CRN: 1222
Course Description

This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality.

COMN 3700 - Topics in Communication: Food and Intercultural Communication (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Hao, Richie Neil
CRN: 1223
COMN 3705 - Tpcs: Psychology of Commun (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
F06/16 - 08/146:00 pm to 9:00 pmJones, Arthur
CRN: 1547
Computer Science (COMP)
COMP 1101 - Analytical Inquiry I
Online06/16 - 07/18 Sherba, Susanne
CRN: 1714
Course Description

Students explore the use of mathematics and computer programming in creating animations. Students create animations on their laptop computers using animation software.

COMP 1101 - Analytical Inquiry I
Online06/16 - 07/18 Sherba, Susanne
CRN: 1956
Course Description

Students explore the use of mathematics and computer programming in creating animations. Students create animations on their laptop computers using animation software.

COMP 2300 - Discrete Structures in Computer Science
Online06/16 - 07/18 Durso, Catherine
CRN: 1723
Course Description

Number systems and basic number theory, propositional and predicate logic, proof techniques, mathematical induction, sets, counting and discrete probability, case studies with applications from computer science, such as data representation, algorithm analysis and correctness, and system design.

COMP 2673 - Introduction to Computer Science III
M T W R06/16 - 07/1812:00 pm to 1:50 pmAlBow, Mohammed
CRN: 1715
Course Description

An introduction to several advanced topics in computer science. Topics vary from year to year and may include any of the following: theory of computing, cryptography, databases, computer graphics, graph theory, game theory, fractals, mathematical programming, wavelets, file compression, computational biology, genetic algorithms, neural networks, simulation and queuing theory, randomized algorithms, parallel computing, complexity analysis, numerical methods. Prerequisite: COMP 1672 or COMP 1771.

COMP 3361 - DS: Operating Systems I (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 07/23 - 07/23  
CRN: 2046
Course Description

Operating systems functions and concepts; processes, process communication, synchronization; processor allocation, memory management in multiprogramming, time sharing systems. Prerequisites: COMP 2355, COMP 2370, and COMP 2691.

COMP 3361 - DS: Operating Systems I (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 06/16 - 08/14 Dewri, Rinku
CRN: 2047
Course Description

Operating systems functions and concepts; processes, process communication, synchronization; processor allocation, memory management in multiprogramming, time sharing systems. Prerequisites: COMP 2355, COMP 2370, and COMP 2691.

COMP 3410 - World Wide Web Programming
M R06/16 - 07/1812:00 pm to 3:50 pmLiszewski, Erica
CRN: 1718
Course Description

Creating WWW pages with HTML, accessing user-written programs via CGI scripts, creating forms, imagemaps and tables, and Java programming principles and techniques. Prerequisite: COMP 2355.

COMP 3704 - Tpcs: iOS Programming (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 06/16 - 08/14 Thurimella, Ramakrishna
CRN: 1720
Construction Management (CMGT)
CMGT 2170 - Commercial Construction Systems (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/145:30 pm to 7:40 pmStein, Stuart
CRN: 1083
Course Description

Continuation of CMGT 2160. Introduces typical commercial construction systems' structural, environmental, and mechanical and electrical construction systems. The influence of sustainability in construction materials and methods will be introduced for each system presented. Cross listed with CMGT 4410. Prerequisites: CMGT 2160 and degree checkpoint 2.

Economics (ECON)
ECON 1020 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics I: History and Theories (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Cole, Paula
CRN: 1226
Course Description

This course presents an introductory analysis of how the economic aspects of our society operate. We begin with a brief examination of the development of human economic arrangements and how these developed into the kind of economy we have today. We then look at some of the historical development of how people thought that economic activity works and how they thought it should work. Then we go into an examination of the workings of markets and economic competition--what we call micro-economics--by examining some of the relevant theory as well as its embodiment in developments in the U.S. economy. Following that, we examine in much more detail the theory and some current issues involved in what we call macro-economics--the study of the workings of the national economy as a whole, with its concerns to explain such matters as the national rates of unemployment and price inflation, along with a study of the monetary and financial aspects of the economy and the promises and problems of gender from many different directions.

ECON 1020 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics I: History and Theories (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M T W R07/21 - 08/148:10 am to 10:40 amUrquhart, Robert
CRN: 1227
Course Description

This course presents an introductory analysis of how the economic aspects of our society operate. We begin with a brief examination of the development of human economic arrangements and how these developed into the kind of economy we have today. We then look at some of the historical development of how people thought that economic activity works and how they thought it should work. Then we go into an examination of the workings of markets and economic competition--what we call micro-economics--by examining some of the relevant theory as well as its embodiment in developments in the U.S. economy. Following that, we examine in much more detail the theory and some current issues involved in what we call macro-economics--the study of the workings of the national economy as a whole, with its concerns to explain such matters as the national rates of unemployment and price inflation, along with a study of the monetary and financial aspects of the economy and the promises and problems of gender from many different directions.

ECON 1030 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics II: Theories and Policies (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Zuchegno, Daniel
CRN: 1228
Course Description

Examination of how markets work and the process of competition; public policy toward markets; antitrust, regulation, deregulation, public enterprise vs. privatization, etc.; distribution of income, labor-management and management-ownership-finance relations; impact of macroeconomic and international issues and policies on business, labor and consumers. Prerequisite: ECON 1020.

ECON 1030 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics II: Theories and Policies (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M T W R06/16 - 07/118:10 am to 10:40 amZuchegno, Daniel
CRN: 1229
Course Description

Examination of how markets work and the process of competition; public policy toward markets; antitrust, regulation, deregulation, public enterprise vs. privatization, etc.; distribution of income, labor-management and management-ownership-finance relations; impact of macroeconomic and international issues and policies on business, labor and consumers. Prerequisite: ECON 1020.

Engineering (ENGR)
ENGR 3510 - Renewable and Efficient Power and Energy Systems (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
T R07/21 - 08/145:00 pm to 8:50 pmGao, Wenzhong
CRN: 1728
Course Description

This course introduces the current and future sustainable electrical power systems. Fundamentals of renewable energy sources and storage systems are discussed. Interfaces of the new sources to the utility grid are covered. Prerequisite: ENEE 2021.

ENGR 3721 - Controls
Off-Site06/09 - 08/155:00 pm to 8:30 pmDandaroy, Indranil
CRN: 2112
Course Description

Modeling, analysis and design of linear feedback control systems using Laplace transform methods. Techniques and methods used in linear mathematical models of mechanical, electrical, thermal and fluid systems are covered. Feedback control system models, design methods and performance criteria in both time and frequency domains. A linear feedback control system design project is required. Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

Engineering, Mechanical (ENME)
ENME 3820 - Tpcs: 3D Printing Applications (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M T W R06/16 - 07/112:00 pm to 3:50 pmBourn, Brandon
CRN: 1726
Course Description

Mechanical engineering topics as announced. May be taken more than once. Prerequisite: vary with offering.

English (ENGL)
ENGL 1110 - Literary Inquiry: American Literature of the New West (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Stratton, Billy
CRN: 1279
Course Description

Literary Inquiry introduces students to the variety of ways that poetry, fiction, and/or drama expand our understanding of what it means to be human. Topics vary to engage students in the rewarding process of interpreting the literary art form as a unique cultural expression.

ENGL 1110 - Literary Inquiry: Mothers, Murderers, and Monks: The Gothic Tradition in 18th Century England (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Golightly, Jennifer
CRN: 1777
Course Description

Literary Inquiry introduces students to the variety of ways that poetry, fiction, and/or drama expand our understanding of what it means to be human. Topics vary to engage students in the rewarding process of interpreting the literary art form as a unique cultural expression.

ENGL 2130 - World Literature (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1281
Course Description

A literary journey around the world, the focus of this course includes the study of modern literature from different parts of the world--such as Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Textual analysis as well as cultural and transnational contexts are emphasized.

ENGL 2708 - Topics in English:Horror in Literature and Film
M T W R F08/25 - 08/2910:00 am to 4:00 pmStratton, Billy,
Quinney, Charlotte
CRN: 1002
ENGL 2708 - Topics in English:Global Englishes and Cinema
M T W R F08/25 - 08/2910:00 am to 5:30 pmNwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1001
ENGL 2710 - American Novel-19th & 20th Century (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Davis, Clark
CRN: 1282
ENGL 2712 - American Short Story (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Davis, Clark
CRN: 1283
Course Description

Wide range of American short stories, quintessential American genre, from the early 19th century to present.

Finance (FIN)
FIN 2800 - Financial Decision Making (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/1410:30 am to 12:40 pmSmith, Andrew
CRN: 1465
Course Description

Basic financial principles and analytical skills including ratio analysis, breakeven analysis and leverage, net present value, internal rate of return, and standard forecasting techniques. Prerequisites: ACTG 2200, STAT 1400 or INFO 1020, and degree checkpoint 1.

FIN 3000 - Mathematics in Finance (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
F06/16 - 08/1412:00 pm to 3:50 pmHannum, Robert
CRN: 1466
Course Description

This course is a continuation of the basic calculus course focusing on multivariate differential calculus and an introduction to linear algebra. Students are given a rigorous introduction to multivariate calculus and linear algebra with emphasis on applications of these topics to finance. Modern finance is a quantitative discipline and students need an understanding of partial derivatives and linear algebra to succeed in their careers. Some examples of the financial applications students learn include finding hedge ratios; minimum-variance portfolio weights; valuing financial and real options; deriving option price sensitivities; deriving duration and convexity on a bond; capital structure and dividend theories; and regression analysis, to name just a few. For Finance majors who started at DU in autumn 2012 or later only. Prerequisite: MATH 1200 or MATH 1951.

FIN 3300 - Investments (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/141:00 pm to 3:10 pmKhindanova, Irina
CRN: 1467
Course Description

Survey of marketable securities, markets, regulation, and risk and return measurement with introduction to fundamental and technical analysis. Prerequisites: FIN 2800 and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3310 - Analysis of Securities (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/143:20 pm to 5:25 pmSherbo, Andrew
CRN: 1468
Course Description

Analysis, valuation and selection of equity securities. Prerequisites: FIN 3300 and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3410 - Multinational Financial Management (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/1410:30 am to 12:40 pmKhindanova, Irina
CRN: 1470
Course Description

Survey and analysis of financial management within and among multinational corporations; Eurodollars, Euromarkets and foreign currencies. Prerequisites: FIN 2800 and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3500 - Financial Modeling (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/141:00 pm to 3:10 pmCook, Thomas
CRN: 1471
Course Description

Use of Excel functions and macros to construct financial models from corporate finance, investments and financial markets. Prerequisites: FIN 3200, FIN 3300 and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3700 - Tp:Quant Method in Stock Selec (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/145:30 pm to 7:40 pmTremblay, Jean-Philippe
CRN: 1483
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to finance. Prerequisites: instructor's permission and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3700 - Tpc: Economics of Gambling (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
F06/16 - 08/148:00 am to 11:50 amHannum, Robert
CRN: 1481
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to finance. Prerequisites: instructor's permission and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3700 - Tpcs: Investment Banking in NY
T07/22 - 07/225:30 pm to 7:40 pmClouse, Maclyn
T08/05 - 08/055:30 pm to 7:40 pmClouse, Maclyn
R08/07 - 08/075:30 pm to 7:40 pmClouse, Maclyn
T08/12 - 08/125:30 pm to 7:40 pmClouse, Maclyn
 08/18 - 08/22 Clouse, Maclyn
CRN: 1507
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to finance. Prerequisites: instructor's permission and degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3710 - Reiman Fund I (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Hughen, John
CRN: 1485
Course Description

This course is a practical portfolio management class designed to cover the major areas of the investment management lifecycle. This course focuses heavily on learning and using leading industry data and analytical tools to support the investment decision-making process in a live portfolio environment. The class recommendations and decisions are implemented in the Reiman Fund portfolio. This is an elective course that is the first in the series of classes involving the Reiman Fund portfolio. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2.

FIN 3720 - Reiman Fund II (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Hughen, John
CRN: 1486
Course Description

This course is a practical portfolio management class designed to cover the major areas of the investment management lifecycle. This course focuses heavily on learning and using leading industry data and analytical tools to support the investment decision-making process in a live portfolio environment. The class recommendations and decisions are implemented in the Reiman Fund portfolio. This is an elective course that is the second in the series of classes involving the Reiman Fund portfolio. Preequisite: FIN 3710.

FIN 3730 - Reiman Fund III (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Hughen, John
CRN: 1487
Course Description

This course is a practical portfolio management class designed to cover the major areas of the investment management lifecycle. This course focuses heavily on learning and using leading industry data and analytical tools to support the investment decision-making process in a live portfolio environment. The class recommendations and decisions are implemented in the Reiman Fund portfolio. This is an elective course that is the third in the series of classes involving the Reiman Fund portfolio. Prerequisite: FIN 3720.

First-Year Seminar (FSEM)
FSEM 1110 - First Year Seminar: Enhancing Speaking Skills for International Students (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M T W R06/16 - 07/112:30 pm to 4:50 pmSwartley, Ethel
CRN: 1940
Course Description

This course introduces undergraduate first-year international students to academic culture. In addition, the course introduces some aspects of American cultural ideals and values as they pertain to academic life. Many first-year undergraduate students face challenges with course work, balancing academic and campus life. The demands can be much more intense for first-year undergraduate international students, who navigate all the same issues while in a foreign culture. The instructors in these courses are sensitive to the demands placed on international students, and serve as formal advisors to the students in this course. In this class, students are challenged to participate as members of an intellectual community. The course work is designed to improve critical thinking skills and logical reasoning through impromptu and prepared discussion as well as classroom presentations. Students are expected to read articles and watch video outside class, refer to assigned texts during class discussion, synthesize ideas from course materials, and state and support their personal ideas regarding course topics. Must be a first-year international student to enroll in this course.

French (FREN)
FREN 2997 - Internship Abroad
Abroad07/03 - 07/31 Victor, Jacqueline
CRN: 1114
Course Description

A business or community experience related to French language or culture. Opportunity to work with business or community organizations. Prerequisite: FREN 2003 or above.

Gender and Women's Studies (GWST)
GWST 1112 - Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies
M W F07/07 - 07/259:20 am to 1:40 pmGordon, Hava
CRN: 1230
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of gender and women's studies. All cultures engage in a complex process of assigning cultural values and social roles which vary according to the cultural environment in which human interaction occurs. Among these, the process of translating biological differences into a complex system of gender remains one of the most important. Gender and women's studies aims to understand how this process of 'gendering' occurs, and its larger effects in society. This course also explores how this system of meaning relates to other systems of allocating power, including socioeconomic class, social status, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and nationality. Using this lens, this course explores contemporary social developments and problems. Gender and women's studies is about studying, but it is also about meaningful engagement with the world. This class presents students with a variety of types of texts from sociological articles to literary fictions and documentary and fictional cinema to explore gender from many different directions.

GWST 2212 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1462
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: what is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, the class explores how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities ?from the ground up.? This course is cross-listed with COMN 2210.

GWST 2212 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1463
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: what is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, the class explores how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities ?from the ground up.? This course is cross-listed with COMN 2210.

GWST 2700 - Tpc: Gndr/Sxlty in Horror Film
U06/08 - 06/089:00 am to 5:00 pmQuinney, Charlotte
M T W R F06/08 - 06/156:00 pm to 10:00 pmQuinney, Charlotte
CRN: 1001
Course Description

Current issues or gender and women's studies faculty research interests.

GWST 2700 - Tpc: Reading Shakespeare's Wmn (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
W06/16 - 08/146:00 pm to 9:50 pmTyburski, Susan
CRN: 1542
Course Description

Current issues or gender and women's studies faculty research interests.

Geography (GEOG)
GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather
M T W R06/16 - 07/038:10 am to 10:20 amTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1162
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather
T W R06/16 - 07/0310:30 am to 12:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1163
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather
T W R06/16 - 07/0310:30 am to 12:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1164
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Keables, Michael
CRN: 1165
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology
M T W R07/07 - 07/258:10 am to 10:20 amFielding, Russell
CRN: 1166
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology
T W R07/07 - 07/2510:30 am to 12:20 pmFielding, Russell
CRN: 1167
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology
T W R07/07 - 07/2510:30 am to 12:20 pmFielding, Russell
CRN: 1168
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/148:10 am to 10:20 amSullivan, Donald
CRN: 1169
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
T W R07/28 - 08/1410:30 am to 12:20 pmSullivan, Donald
CRN: 1170
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
T W R07/28 - 08/1410:30 am to 12:20 pmSullivan, Donald
CRN: 1171
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1410 - People, Places & Landscapes (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/142:10 pm to 5:30 pmTaylor, Matthew
CRN: 1447
Course Description

In this course, students will study the location of people and activities across the surface of the Earth. Describing the locations and patterns of human activity only lays the foundation for exploring how and why such patterns have developed historically, and how they relate to the natural environment and other aspects of human behavior.

GEOG 2100 - Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
M T W R06/16 - 07/038:10 am to 11:15 amHoover, Joseph
CRN: 1172
Course Description

Overview of GIS, including background, development, trends, and prospects in this technological field; software package and hands-on exercises used to examine basic geographic concepts and spatial data characteristics associated with automated mapping, projections, scales, geocoding, coordinate referencing, and data structures for computerized land-based data bases. Cross listed with GEOG 3100.

GEOG 2500 - Sustainability & Human Society
T R06/16 - 07/178:10 am to 12:10 pmLavanchy, Gary
CRN: 1173
Course Description

Sustainability has become a catch phrase in discussions concerning the long-term viability of a number of phenomena, from the environment to the economy. Sustainability is commonly defined as meeting the needs of the current generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Students are introduced to issues inherent in discussions of sustainability. The major areas of focus include definitions of ecological and environmental sustainability, economic and political sustainability, and social justice, and various metrics used to assess sustainable behavior and practices. Students study the theory, principles and practices of sustainability, and participate in discussion and writing exercises based on lecture and readings.

GEOG 3750 - Biogeography in the Florida Keys
M T W R06/09 - 06/168:00 am to 6:00 pmFielding, Russell
CRN: 1002
Course Description

This course investigates various aspects of the relationships between human societies and the natural environment.

GEOG 3930 - Nicaragua: Development Dilemmas
U M T W R S06/07 - 06/158:00 am to 5:00 pmTaylor, Matthew
CRN: 1007
Course Description

Topics, methods and current research in cultural geography.

German (GERM)
GERM 1416 - German Civilization: History, Politics, and Culture (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1115
Course Description

This course is an introduction to intellectual and cultural currents in German civilization from the Enlightenment to the present, emphasizing the arts in the context of history and philosophy from the late 18th century to around the mid-20th century. Readings include excerpts from such thinkers as Kant, Fichte, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, as well as poetry and short fictional works by Heine, Junger, Remarque, Borchert, and others. The readings are supplemented by films that students are expected to have watched at the beginning of each week.

Greek (GREK)
GREK 1416 - Myths of Greece & Rome (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M T W R06/16 - 07/119:20 am to 11:40 amCastellani, Victor
CRN: 1116
Course Description

Introduction to the goddesses and gods, heroes and heroines, and not a few monstrosities from popular tradition, literature, and visual arts of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Activities include imaginative and creative assignments. No prerequisite.

History (HIST)
HIST 1350 - History of the British Empire (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M W F07/21 - 08/149:00 am to 12:20 pmKreider, Jodie
CRN: 1493
Course Description

This course explores the rise and fall of the British Empire from its origins during the English conquests of Wales, Scotland and Ireland; explorations of the world, through commercial expansion under the British East India Company; the rise of Britain as the preeminent world imperial power during the 19th century and its eventual decline and legacy during the late 20th century. Using a variety of secondary articles, primary sources, films and monographs, this course analyzes highly debated issues including the interconnected nature of British society and developments out in the Empire, both cultural and political; the important role that women, gender, and racial ideologies placed in British dominance of one quarter of the globe; how the empire and representations of Empire changed over the century; and finally, the impact of that empire upon issues of identity and population in a post-colonial Britain.

HIST 2701 - Specail Topics: Denver and Its University- 150 Years of Higher Education in Denver
M T W R F08/25 - 08/299:00 am to 5:00 pmFisher, Steven
CRN: 1017
HIST 2701 - Topics in History: The Civil Rights Movement (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M T R06/16 - 07/119:20 am to 12:40 pmCollisson, Craig
CRN: 1231
Hotel, Restaurant, Tourism Mgt (HRTM)
HRTM 1200 - Industry Work Experience (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 06/16 - 08/14 Corsun, David
CRN: 1190
Course Description

Faculty supervised work experience. Prerequisites: HRTM 1100 and completion of 500 hours of approved work experience.

HRTM 3000 - Wines of the World (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M T W R07/21 - 08/142:00 pm to 4:30 pmLane, Eric
CRN: 1192
Course Description

A survey course of the wines of the world, including old and new world wines; still, sparkling, dessert and fortified wines; viticulture and viniculture. Prerequisite: must be at least 21 years of age. Non-majors only.

Info Tech & E-Commerce (ITEC)
ITEC 3840 - Practicum (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 06/16 - 08/14 Phillips, Amy
CRN: 1370
Course Description

Faculty supervised work experience. Instructor approval required.

International Studies (INTS)
INTS 1500 - Contemporary Issues in the Global Economy (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Archer, Kevin
CRN: 1385
Course Description

Introduction to a range of pressing problems and debates in today's global economy, such as global economy, global markets and the global commons. Students will have a good understanding of the policy challenges posed by global economic integration and theoretical frameworks for understanding the functioning of the global economy.

INTS 1700 - Introduction to International Politics (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Archer, Kevin
CRN: 1396
Course Description

Central concepts and major theories to assist in organizing an understanding of international politics including balance of power, international organizations, foreign policy decision making, and conflict theory; application of current topics.

INTS 3701 - Topics: Urban Farming (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
T R06/16 - 07/118:10 am to 1:10 pmBreger Bush, Sasha
CRN: 1390
Course Description

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3702 - Topics: Participatory Dvlpmt (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M W R06/16 - 07/111:00 pm to 4:20 pmO'Dell, Roni Kay
CRN: 1395
Course Description

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

INTS 3703 - Tpc: State/Scty in Mntn Region (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
T R07/21 - 08/149:20 am to 2:20 pmKlick, Matthew
CRN: 1397
Course Description

Prerequisites: INTS 1500 and INTS 1700.

Leadership (LDRS)
LDRS 2310 - Leadership in a Virtual World
 06/16 - 07/18 Olson, Linda
CRN: 1007
Course Description

Distributed organizations are commonplace in the high-tech world in which we now find ourselves living and working. Leading in private and public settings requires a developed set of skills to utilize the virtual environment to advance a shared goal. Technical skills and communication take on new importance for leading virtually. This course focuses on these new realities of today's work and community environments. Through readings of current research on virtual work and team leadership as well as online assignments to recognize, practice and develop needed skills, students gain a strong foundational understanding of what constitutes effectiveness in virtual work and community leadership.

Management (MGMT)
MGMT 2420 - International Management (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 06/1612:00 pm to 2:00 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/18 - 06/1812:00 pm to 2:00 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/20 - 06/2012:00 pm to 2:00 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/23 - 06/2312:00 pm to 2:00 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/25 - 06/2512:00 pm to 2:00 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online06/27 - 06/2712:00 pm to 2:00 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
Online07/11 - 07/1112:00 pm to 2:00 pmNarapareddy, Vijaya
CRN: 1708
Course Description

Introduction to multinational corporations and management of international profit and non-profit organizations; how management theory and practice are impacted by particular cultural contexts; analysis of current issues related to international trade and investments, and problems and opportunities of multinational operations. Prerequisites: MGMT 2000 and degree checkpoint 2.

MGMT 3700 - Topcis in Management: Stress Management
U M T W R06/08 - 06/123:00 pm to 9:00 pmSampson, Nancy,
McNab, Diana
CRN: 1003
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to management. Prerequisites: MGMT 2000 and degree checkpoint 2.

MGMT 3700 - Topics in Managment: Stress Management
U M T F S08/15 - 08/193:00 pm to 9:00 pmSampson, Nancy,
McNab, Diana
CRN: 1006
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to management. Prerequisites: MGMT 2000 and degree checkpoint 2.

MGMT 3700 - Stress Management (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/145:30 pm to 7:40 pmStuart, Barbara
Online06/16 - 08/14 Stuart, Barbara
CRN: 1424
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to management. Prerequisites: MGMT 2000 and degree checkpoint 2.

MGMT 3700 - Topics in Management: Indonesia. Is BoP relevant?
U M T W R F S08/23 - 08/317:00 am to 3:30 pmStuart, Barbara
CRN: 1004
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to management. Prerequisites: MGMT 2000 and degree checkpoint 2.

MGMT 3800 - Business Policy and Strategy (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/143:20 pm to 5:25 pmLewis, Edward
CRN: 1442
Course Description

This course examines the roles and responsibilities of top managers in developing, implementing, and managing an effective organization-wide strategy. Students learn new perspectives and concepts as well as integrate learning from previous course work to solve complex and challenging business problems. Prerequisites: senior standing and completion of all undergraduate business core classes with minimum grade of "C-" in each course.

Marketing (MKTG)
MKTG 2800 - Introduction to Marketing (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Quinlan-Wilder, Tia
CRN: 1193
Course Description

Students develop the ability to make sound planning decisions regarding market feasibility of a new product based on business and consumer research information. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 1.

MKTG 2800 - Introduction to Marketing (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Quinlan-Wilder, Tia
CRN: 1194
Course Description

Students develop the ability to make sound planning decisions regarding market feasibility of a new product based on business and consumer research information. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 1.

MKTG 2910 - Consumer Behavior
U06/08 - 06/088:00 am to 4:00 pmKelly, Lynn
M T W R06/09 - 06/126:00 pm to 10:00 pmKelly, Lynn
U S06/14 - 06/158:00 am to 4:00 pmKelly, Lynn
CRN: 1005
Course Description

Human consumption behavior; application of behavioral science theories to consumer decision making in marketing management. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

MKTG 2910 - Consumer Behavior (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Quinlan-Wilder, Tia
CRN: 1195
Course Description

Human consumption behavior; application of behavioral science theories to consumer decision making in marketing management. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

MKTG 2910 - Consumer Behavior (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Quinlan-Wilder, Tia
CRN: 1888
Course Description

Human consumption behavior; application of behavioral science theories to consumer decision making in marketing management. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

MKTG 3480 - Introduction to Digital Marketing (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/143:20 pm to 5:25 pmBrooks, Stephanie
CRN: 1207
Course Description

Digital marketing is the most rapidly evolving component in the arsenal of tactics to achieve brand strategies. Students will learn how to apply the key technologies, tools and techniques within digital marketing effectively, and how to integrate successfully online tools and media within the overall marketing mix. Students will be able to plan effectively and apply digital technologies and techniques, while continuously improving the value that digital media contributes to the success of their marketing programs. Cross listed with MKTG 4805. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

MKTG 3480 - Introduction to Digital Marketing (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Lutz, Michele
CRN: 1209
Course Description

Digital marketing is the most rapidly evolving component in the arsenal of tactics to achieve brand strategies. Students will learn how to apply the key technologies, tools and techniques within digital marketing effectively, and how to integrate successfully online tools and media within the overall marketing mix. Students will be able to plan effectively and apply digital technologies and techniques, while continuously improving the value that digital media contributes to the success of their marketing programs. Cross listed with MKTG 4805. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

MKTG 3485 - Digital Metrics and Search (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/147:50 pm to 10:00 pmMyers, Michael
CRN: 1933
Course Description

Students learn to evaluate the major digital tools that marketers can utilize to increase revenue, execute on strategies and develop deep brands. This course reviews those tools and gives students hands-on experience with website content management systems, iPhone/iPad analytics, blogging software and social media management tools. Cross listed with MKTG 4835. Prerequisites: MKTG 2010 or MKTG 2800, MKTG 3480, and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

MKTG 3490 - Social Media Marketing (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/145:30 pm to 7:40 pmMyers, Michael
CRN: 1211
Course Description

Students learn how to develop and implement a social media marketing campaign. Cross listed with MKTG 4815. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 or MKTG 2010 and MKTG 3480.

MKTG 3630 - International Marketing (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Paul, Pallab
CRN: 1710
Course Description

Marketing and related business decisions in global marketplace; emphasis on cultural, social, economic and competitive variables. Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

MKTG 3660 - Sports & Entertainment Marketing
T R06/16 - 07/185:30 pm to 9:30 pmKitts, Brian
CRN: 1453
Course Description

This course examines the rapidly developing sports industry from a strategic marketing perspective. It is based on the belief that the best marketing practices employed by the more traditional consumer goods and business-to-business organizations can be effectively applied to organizations that produce sports as their primary product. The course is designed to familiarize students with the terms and tools needed in the sports industry and to develop skills that assist critical thinking or continued success in this unique business setting. Cross listed with MKTG 4660. Prerequisite: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

MKTG 3704 - Tpcs: Services Marketing (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/146:00 pm to 7:50 pmGnuse, Robert
CRN: 1829
Course Description

Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2.

MKTG 3705 - Topics: Brand Management (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M T W R F06/16 - 06/278:00 am to 12:00 pmJohnson, Carol
CRN: 1443
Course Description

Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

MKTG 3705 - Tpc: Int'l Consumer Behavior (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Paul, Pallab
CRN: 1458
Course Description

Prerequisites: MKTG 2800 and degree checkpoint 2 or marketing minor.

Mathematics (MATH)
MATH 1200 - Calculus for Business and Social Sciences (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M W R06/16 - 07/118:10 am to 11:30 amSobieczky, Florian
CRN: 1122
Course Description

This is a one-quarter course for students in business, social sciences, and liberal arts. It covers elementary differential calculus with emphasis on applications to business and the social sciences. Topics include functions, graphs, limits, continuity, differentiation, and mathematical models. Students are required to attend weekly labs.

MATH 1750 - College Algebra & Trigonometry (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M W R06/16 - 07/119:20 am to 12:40 pmHerrmann, George
CRN: 1123
Course Description

Selected topics in algebra and analytic trigonometry intended to prepare students for the calculus sequence (MATH 1951, 1952, 1953). Cannot be used to satisfy the Analytical Inquiry: The Natural & Physical World requirement.

MATH 1951 - Calculus I
Online06/16 - 07/18 Korf, Lisa
CRN: 1126
Course Description

Limits, continuity, differentiation of functions of one variable, applications of the derivative. Prerequisite: MATH 1750 or equivalent.

MATH 1952 - Calculus II (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M T W R07/21 - 08/141:00 pm to 3:30 pmSobieczky, Florian
CRN: 1124
Course Description

Differentiation and integration of functions of one variable especially focusing on the theory, techniques and applications of integration. Prerequisite: MATH 1951.

MATH 1953 - Calculus III (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M T W R F06/16 - 07/1110:30 am to 12:30 pmGriesmer, John
CRN: 1125
Course Description

Integration of functions of one variable, infinite sequences and series, polar coordinates, parametric equations. Prerequisite: MATH 1952 OR math 1962.

Media Film Journalism Studies (MFJS)
MFJS 2000 - Introduction to Film Criticism
M T W R06/16 - 07/031:00 pm to 4:20 pmBuxton, Rodney
CRN: 1089
Course Description

Theories and methods of social, cultural and aesthetic criticism of film; emphasis on critical writing. Laboratory fee required.

MFJS 2130 - Literary Journalism (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Henry, Elizabeth
CRN: 1528
MFJS 3229 - Video Editing is for Everybody
M T W R F06/16 - 06/209:00 am to 5:00 pmSchroeder, Sheila
CRN: 1090
Course Description

The goal for this course is for students to have a basic working knowledge of editing using various media elements (video, audio, photos, music, graphics), developing proficiencies using different editing software, and applying a mixture of editing theories and techniques. This is a summer course only.

MFJS 3900 - Topics in Media Film & Journalism Studies: Cross-Cultural Travel Sem:Border Cultures, Communication
U M T W R F S06/09 - 06/158:00 am to 5:00 pmThompson, Margaret,
Suarez, Maria
CRN: 1010
MFJS 3900 - Topics: History of Photography (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Henry, Elizabeth
CRN: 1091
MFJS 3900 - Topics in Mass Communication: Multicultural Journalism (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Thompson, Margaret
CRN: 1092
Music-Academic Classes (MUAC)
MUAC 1001 - Music Theory I (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1234
MUAC 1002 - Music Theory I (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1235
MUAC 1003 - Music Theory I (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1236
MUAC 1020 - Aural Skills I (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1237
Course Description

Development of aural analysis skills in meter, mode, harmonic function and song forms through solfeggio, singing and dictation.

MUAC 1021 - Aural Skills I (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1238
Course Description

Development of aural analysis skills in meter, mode, harmonic function and song forms through solfeggio, singing and dictation.

MUAC 1022 - Aural Skills I (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1239
Course Description

Development of aural analysis in meter, mode, harmonic function and song forms through solfeggio, singing and dictation.

MUAC 2004 - Music Theory II (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1240
MUAC 2005 - Music Theory II (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1241
MUAC 2006 - Music Theory II (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1242
MUAC 2020 - Aural Skills II (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1243
Course Description

Dictation and sight singing of melodic, harmonic and contrapuntal examples from common practice period.

MUAC 2021 - Aural Skills II (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1244
Course Description

Dictation and sight singing of melodic, harmonic and contrapuntal examples from common practice period.

MUAC 2022 - Aural Skills II (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
 06/16 - 07/11 Kehn, Conrad
CRN: 1245
Course Description

Dictation and sight singing of melodic, harmonic and contrapuntal examples from common practice period.

Philosophy (PHIL)
PHIL 2007 - Philosophy and Video Games (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Surber, Jere
CRN: 1074
Course Description

Traditional and novel metaphysical, ethical, political, and aesthetic issues both arising within video games and posed by this still developing medium. No prerequisites.

PHIL 2700 - Biomedical Ethics
M T W R07/21 - 08/079:20 am to 12:50 pmBrown, Jeffrey
CRN: 1506
Course Description

Discussion of some of the most pressing ethical issues engaged by contemporary developments in biology and medicine.

Physics & Astronomy (PHYS)
PHYS 1111 - General Physics I
M T W R F07/07 - 07/259:20 am to 12:20 pmIona, Steven
CRN: 1127
Course Description

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Lab fee associated with this course.

PHYS 1111 - General Physics I
M W F07/07 - 07/251:00 pm to 3:00 pmIona, Steven
CRN: 1128
Course Description

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Lab fee associated with this course.

PHYS 2063 - Observing & Data Analysis
M T W R F08/18 - 08/2910:00 am to 11:59 pmStencel, Robert
CRN: 1003
Course Description

In this summer-only class, the student will learn fundamentals of astronomical research with hands-on observing and data analysis opportunities at DU's Meyer-Womble Observatory located high atop Mt. Evans, 35 miles west of campus. Good health is essential to withstand the rigors of high altitude and nighttime work at this remarkable site. Contact the instructor for guidelines and details. Credit can apply toward physics or astrophysics minor. Prerequisite: PHYS 1050 or PHYS 1070 or PHYS 1090 or PHYS 1111 or PHYS 1211 or instructor's permission.

Psychology (PSYC)
PSYC 1001 - Foundations of Psychological Science (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Miller, Pamela
CRN: 1263
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of mind and behavior. It includes topics such as the biological basis of behavior, the developmental transitions from infancy through old age, the principles underlying perception, learning and memory, and the ways in which behavior is affected by its physical, social, and cultural context.

PSYC 1001 - Foundations of Psychological Science
Online07/14 - 08/14 Reichmann-Decker, Aimee
CRN: 1905
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of mind and behavior. It includes topics such as the biological basis of behavior, the developmental transitions from infancy through old age, the principles underlying perception, learning and memory, and the ways in which behavior is affected by its physical, social, and cultural context.

PSYC 2031 - Introduction to Cognitive Neuroscience (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Rossi, Christy
CRN: 1264
Course Description

The goal of this course is to examine the relations between brain and behavior to better understand how complex behavior is mediated by the brain. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2070 - Child and Lifespan Development (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Enos, Sarah
CRN: 1275
Course Description

This course explores physical, cognitive, social and emotional development across the lifespan, from the prenatal period through death. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 2112 - Reseach Apprenticeship (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 07/23 - 07/23  
CRN: 2053
Course Description

Through this course, students receive course credit for an internship in which they work as a research assistance. Permission of instructor required.

PSYC 2112 - Reseach Apprenticeship (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 06/16 - 08/14 Hankin, Benjamin
CRN: 2054
Course Description

Through this course, students receive course credit for an internship in which they work as a research assistance. Permission of instructor required.

PSYC 2112 - Reseach Apprenticeship (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 06/16 - 08/14 McRae, Kateri
CRN: 2234
Course Description

Through this course, students receive course credit for an internship in which they work as a research assistance. Permission of instructor required.

PSYC 2500 - Abnormal Psychology (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M T W R07/21 - 08/149:20 am to 11:50 amHankin, Benjamin
CRN: 1266
Course Description

Nature, causes, treatment and prevention of patterns of abnormal behavior. Prerequisite: PSYC 1001.

PSYC 3050 - Research Methods
T R06/16 - 07/038:10 am to 2:50 pmAustin, David
CRN: 1267
Course Description

Survey of research methods and research designs in psychology used to study behavior. Required for all students, especially those planning graduate work in psychology. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2300.

PSYC 3080 - Drugs and Behavior (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/141:00 pm to 4:20 pmRossi, Christy
CRN: 1276
Course Description

Nature of licit and illicit drugs; their short- and long-term biological and psychological effects. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2031.

PSYC 3530 - Child Psychopathology (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Gudino, Omar
CRN: 1713
Course Description

Child Psychopathology surveys the latest theory and research in the field of developmental psychopathology, which is the study of abnormal behavior from a developmental perspective. Students learn about what the emotional and behavioral disorders of childhood and adolescence are, what causes them, and how they are treated. Additionally, the course covers how we judge what is considered to be abnormal or atypical, how we classify abnormal or atypical behavior, and how we acquire knowledge about developmental psychopathology. Prerequisites: PSYC 1001 and PSYC 2500.

Public Policy (PPOL)
PPOL 3701 - Topics in Public Policy: Getting Results Inside the Beltway: Washington D.C.
U M T W R F06/08 - 06/138:00 am to 5:00 pmCaldwell, Richard
CRN: 1008
Real Estate (REAL)
REAL 1777 - Introduction to Real Estate (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/141:00 pm to 3:10 pmEngelstad, Jeffrey
CRN: 1051
Course Description

Principles of real estate, real estate industry and its markets; legal aspects of home ownership from consumer's point of view, including property rights, title concepts, deeds, purchase contracts, listing contracts, law of agency, environmental issues and disclosures, types of mortgages, basics of home loan finance, appraisal, investment and tax benefits. Partially satisfies Colorado real estate broker licensing requirements. Cross listed with REAL 4400.

REAL 3007 - Computer Applications for Real Estate Analysis (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/147:50 pm to 10:00 pmEngelstad, Jeffrey
CRN: 1071
Course Description

Alternative analysis formats that can be applied to a wide array of real estate analysis issues; simulates working/decision-making environment; structured overview of analysis tools focused on specific facets of multidimensional real estate decision-making environment; applications in investment analysis, feasibility analysis, valuation, market analysis, and report writing and presentation. Cross listed with REAL 4007. Prerequisites: REAL 3307 and degree checkpoint 2.

REAL 3307 - Real Estate Finance (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/145:30 pm to 7:40 pmCrean, Michael
CRN: 1058
Course Description

Sources of financing including institutions and individuals, primary and secondary mortgage markets, mortgage banking, impact of monetary and fiscal policies on financing, underwriting analysis, traditional and alternative or creative financing techniques. Cross listed with REAL 4407. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2.

REAL 3337 - Real Estate Securities and Syndications (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
M W06/16 - 08/148:10 am to 10:20 amLevine, Mark
CRN: 1049
Course Description

Introduction to real estate securities; emphasis on private offerings; determining whether a contemplated transaction involves a security, and what happens if it does; exemptions from registration (Reg D); registration requirements; investor suitability, how to syndicate, acquisition of property, marketing of the property, tax structure and formation of syndication, compensation to syndicators, real estate tax considerations. Application of sustainability concepts is important in this class dealing with real estate securities issues. Cross listed with REAL 4337. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2.

Religious Studies (RLGS)
RLGS 2202 - New Testament (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Robbins, Gregory
CRN: 1064
Course Description

This course takes a multifaceted approach (historical, literary, and critical) to the writings that comprise the Christian New Testament. The New Testament are read as a collection of primary documents that chronicle the primitive Church?s slow and often painful process of self-definition. In these writings it is possible to discern the tension that arose because of the strong religious and cultural ties early Christianity maintained with Palestinian Judaism, from which it emerged as a sectarian or reform movement. The careful reader also finds evidence of the new religion?s encounter with the Greco-Roman world from whose variegated ethos and culture it borrowed considerably on the way to becoming an important religious force in the first century. In exploring the New Testament, then, we attempt to recover something of the sense of what it meant to be a Christian in New Testament times. Cross listed with JUST 2202.

Social Justice (SJUS)
SJUS 2100 - Justice Across Cultures: Cultural Perspectives on Social Justice (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Orsborn, Catherine
CRN: 1217
Course Description

Social justice is a complex and multi-faceted issue. That which constitutes social justice has been understood in a variety of ways across cultures and time. Students in this course explore the concepts of social justice by examining a variety of cultural and religious approaches to the subject paying explicit attention to non-western perspectives. The course pays particular focus on current controversies over global policy issues, including the UN Declaration of Human Rights, and students examine the divergent ideologies of social justice that lie behind these complex debates.

Sociology (SOCI)
SOCI 1810 - Understanding Social Life
M T W R06/16 - 07/049:20 am to 12:50 pmColomy, Paul
CRN: 1252
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the discipline of sociology and to the insights it provides into the human condition.

SOCI 2250 - Criminology
Online06/16 - 07/18 Del Rosso, Jared
CRN: 1253
Course Description

Social meaning of criminal behavior; relationship between crime and society in particular, how production and distribution of economic, political and cultural resources shape construction of law, order and crime; different types of crime, criminals and victims, and efforts to understand and control them.

SOCI 2795 - Capital Punishment
M T W R06/16 - 06/279:20 am to 2:20 pmPhillips, Ronald
CRN: 1254
Course Description

This course examines three main topics: the history of capital punishment (facts and trends, public opinion, legislation, and landmark Supreme Court cases); arguments often made for abolition (arbitrariness, cost, and innocence); and arguments often made for retention (deterrence, incapacitation, and retribution). Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor.

SOCI 3998 - Criminology Assessment (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 06/16 - 08/14 Phillips, Ronald
CRN: 1257
Course Description

This course involves a required assessment of graduating sociology and criminology majors' knowledge of the discipline based on courses taken. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810, SOCI 2005, SOCI 2006, SOCI 2020, and SOCI 2250; permission of instructor.

SOCI 3999 - Sociology Assessment (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
 06/16 - 08/14 Phillips, Ronald
CRN: 1258
Course Description

This course involves a required assessment of graduating sociology and criminology majors' knowledge of the discipline based on courses taken. Prerequisites: SOCI 1810, SOCI 2005, SOCI 2006, SOCI 2020, and SOCI 2420; permission of instructor.

Spanish (SPAN)
SPAN 1001 - Beginning Spanish
M T W R06/16 - 07/039:20 am to 12:30 pmTorre, Javier
CRN: 1117
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1002 - Beginning Spanish
M T W R07/07 - 07/259:20 am to 12:30 pmSantesteban, Sandra
CRN: 1118
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1003 - Beginning Spanish (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/149:20 am to 12:30 pmAdamo, Paula
CRN: 1119
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 2300 - Iberian Culture & Civilization
Abroad07/29 - 08/23 Walter, Susan
CRN: 1120
Course Description

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

SPAN 2300 - Iberian Culture & Civilization
Abroad07/29 - 08/23 Torre, Javier
CRN: 1121
Course Description

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

Statistics (STAT)
STAT 3700 - Tpc: Automating Business Proc (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
T R06/16 - 08/143:20 pm to 5:25 pmKeeling, Kellie
CRN: 1709
Course Description

Exploration of various topics and issues related to statistical applications. Prerequisite: degree checkpoint 2

Theatre (THEA)
THEA 1810 - The Process of Theatre: Page to Stage
M T W R07/21 - 08/079:20 am to 12:40 pmMcDonald, Steven
CRN: 1261
Course Description

Exploration of the process playwrights, directors, actors, and designers use in creating a theatrical production. Individual sections may focus on single areas only?please see department for current offerings. In this course, students will demonstrate the ability to create or interpret the texts, ideas or artifacts of human culture. They will also identify and analyze the connections between these things and the human experience/perception of the world.

Writing (WRIT)
WRIT 1122 - Rhetoric and Academic Writing (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M W F06/16 - 07/111:00 pm to 3:40 pmTaczak, Kara
CRN: 1830
Course Description

On completing this course, students are expected to have enhanced the following knowledge and skills: analytic and critical reading strategies; a basic understanding of rhetorical situations and rhetorical analysis; the ability to write for specific audiences and discourse communities, using effective conversations for these situations; the ability to write texts that are organized, coherent and substantive, demonstrating rhetorical, linguistic design and analytical competence. The course provides instruction and practice in academic and civic writing for well-educated readers. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as additional exercises. Final portfolio.

WRIT 1122 - Rhetoric and Academic Writing (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Colby, Richard
CRN: 1831
Course Description

On completing this course, students are expected to have enhanced the following knowledge and skills: analytic and critical reading strategies; a basic understanding of rhetorical situations and rhetorical analysis; the ability to write for specific audiences and discourse communities, using effective conversations for these situations; the ability to write texts that are organized, coherent and substantive, demonstrating rhetorical, linguistic design and analytical competence. The course provides instruction and practice in academic and civic writing for well-educated readers. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as additional exercises. Final portfolio.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M W F07/21 - 08/141:00 pm to 3:40 pmParrish, Juli
CRN: 1832
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Chapman-Ludwig, April
CRN: 1833
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

Advanced Seminar

Advanced Seminar (ASEM)
ASEM 2460 - Latina/o Religious Traditions (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M T W R06/16 - 07/111:00 pm to 4:30 pmLeon, Luis
CRN: 1066
Course Description

This course is organized around the broad question: Is there enough commonality in the texts (including cultural texts) we have studied to organize and name a singular field of social relations we can rightly call "Lainta/o Religion?" This course engages and excites students by enabling them to study religious traditions in an academic place removed from direct faith commitments. Toward this end, we will view art, hear music, watch films and talk to religious leaders.

ASEM 2482 - Africa (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1945
Course Description

In this course, we study the literature, politics and culture of Africa from pre-colonial times to the present. We begin by examining Africa as the locus of the world's oldest civilization and by discussing some key moments in African history. We then focus on the four regions of Africa, on country- or region-based examples of culture and politics in Africa--such as colonial rule in East Africa, war of independence in North Africa, military rule in West Africa, Apartheid in Southern Africa. We also discuss Africa and the world, or Africa in the context of modern-day globalization. In each case, we discuss historical accounts and literary representations as well as political and cultural contexts.

ASEM 2509 - Communication and Production of Cultures (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Hao, Richie Neil
CRN: 1224
Course Description

Profound changes in the last two decades on the global, national and local scales have brought about a collapse in people?s traditional sources of self-definition, notably those ethnic, racial, geographic, sexual and national bases of group belonging and identity. Given such undermining of the old certainties, answers to the question "Who am I?" have become more tenuous, if not totally "up for grabs." Fragmentation of identities, ethnic conflict, social alienation and a loss of a sense of grounding are only some of the noted hallmarks of the present time. This course is designed to address the implications of this shift in signification--from identity to difference--for the dynamics of identity formation and the search for alternative bases for consensus-formation in the new millennium.

ASEM 2526 - Communication in Close Relationships (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Serewicz, Mary
CRN: 1225
Course Description

Communication in Close Relationships emphasizes the relationship between the self and others at a personal level. We examine research from a variety of disciplines, including communication, psychology, sociology, family studies and history, to increase our understanding of relationships from diverse perspectives. The three main perspectives we investigate show how relationships affect and are affected by their context, the individuals involved and the relational system. The goals of this course are for students to increase their understanding of relationships from diverse perspectives; evaluate critically the information about relationships that we encounter in our everyday lives; ask and investigate questions about real-life relationships; and communicate insights into communication and relationships in a variety of formats.

ASEM 2529 - Analyzing the American Dream - Expressionist Film in 1950's Hollywood (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Gault, James
CRN: 1087
Course Description

This course focuses on the output of a few Hollywood directors (primarily Ida Lupino, Nicholas Ray and Douglas Sirk) who seem to reflect the dominant ideologies of post-war Hollywood. On the surface, their films celebrate middle-class success, a simple American can-do attitude and, most important for this class, characters who seem to reestablish pre-war expectations of femininity and masculinity. Rules of femininity, masculinity and sexuality are a constant focus for these directors, and each has his or her own approach to exploring the repercussions of strict gender assignment.

ASEM 2576 - Art, Thought, Spirituality (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Raschke, Carl
CRN: 1067
Course Description

This course examines the close and complex relationship between esthetic expression and private religiosity, or "spirituality." The course will examine how theories as well as personal accounts of artistic creativity, experience and appreciation can both broaden and deepen our understanding of the inner life that is otherwise communicated in religious terms and how artistic expression can also have a quasi-religious or "spiritual" character. The central objective will be to illumine the way in which the construction of the individual self and the formation of the personal identity are intimately tied to different quests that are artistic and spiritual at once.

ASEM 2577 - Cultural Intersections (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1895
Course Description

In this course, we explore the dynamics of cultural reception or the translational dimension of modern culture, particularly the reception of narratives within particular cultures and beyond. Our main focus is the principles that integrate and divide people along the lines of race, class, ethnicity and culture. Our journey involves studies of cultural contacts, contexts and narratives from Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas.

ASEM 2579 - From Literature to Film (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1277
Course Description

In this course, we examine the adaptation of literary works into films. We closely study selected modern literary works and the film interpretations of each work. Focusing on the transition from one narrative form to another, the course enhances the critical skill of students as well as their creative ability with respect to cinematic translations. We, therefore, also have mini scriptwriting workshops as a way of imaginatively highlighting the sort of considerations that go into the making of the film script.

ASEM 2581 - Forgiveness, Politics and Film (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M W R07/21 - 08/1410:30 am to 2:10 pmWadsworth, Nancy
CRN: 1246
Course Description

This course covers a number of reconciliation frameworks that have been employed as transformative and peacemaking strategies in various interpersonal, social and political contexts. We discuss the value (and limitations) of core reconciliation concepts, see how they have been used productively, and consider their possible application to ongoing problems in the world today.

ASEM 2596 - Politics of Reconciliation (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Sun, Jing
CRN: 1247
Course Description

This class addresses the national and international efforts to seek justice and achieve reconciliation. It examines how state and non-state actors reflect on an unfortunate or hostile past with a designated "other": how did their relations and interactions with this targeted "other" go wrong? What were the material, philosophical and emotional grounds to breed such hostilities? What were the consequences? Has the memory of the "past self" and "past others" shaped the way the two groups interact today? Why do some actors refuse to say "sorry," and why do some victims refuse to forgive? What are the similarities and differences among various reconciliation projects? In this class, we lead students to explore these challenging yet exciting questions.

ASEM 2609 - Literature of Nature and Apocalypse (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Stratton, Billy
CRN: 1278
Course Description

Concern about the declining state of the environment has been a topic of longstanding interest, from Henry David Thoreau to John Muir, and writers like Edward Abbey, Ernest Callenbach, Louise Erdrich, T.C. Boyle, Octavia Burtler, Cormac McCarthy and others. This writing intensive course examines questions relating to environmental activism and social structures predicated upon technological and materialist culture. It considers how American writers have reassessed the relation between religious beliefs and notions of utopia and apocalypse. It examines and analyzes timely and relevant historical, literary, and philosophical issues relating to the current state of the environment.

ASEM 2641 - Globalization from Above and Below (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Gordon, Hava
CRN: 1259
Course Description

This course provides a unique and challenging opportunity for students to clarify the concept of globalization by exploring parallel and interesting forces "from above and below." This course draws widely from international studies, economics, political science, sociology, environmental studies, and feminist theory to examine processes of global social change and conflict. Through academic theorizing and activist writings, the course familiarizes students with some of the landmark debates on globalization. Completion of all Common Curriculum requirements is required prior to registering for this class.

ASEM 2657 - Harry Potter and Esotericism
M T W R07/21 - 08/078:10 am to 11:20 amWarlick, M.
CRN: 1251
Course Description

Today's students have grown up with J. K. Rowling's seven Harry Potter books. This incredible publishing phenomenon has inspired children and adults alike to devour 500-page books within days of publication, at a time when statistics seem to indicate that people are no longer reading. Why would these tales of English school children learning a curriculum of magical skills have so captured the imagination of a generation of young people living in a post-modern world? The purpose of this class then is to examine the role of esoteric themes that pervade the Harry Potter books and to investigate the history of those subjects from the Middle Ages to the present, by focusing on the visual traditions they inspired. Areas discussed include the history of magic and witchcraft, classical and Celtic mythology, alchemy, astrology, fantastic beasts, "books of secrets" and their healing potions, the mythic lore of botany, divination and various esoteric paths of enlightenment.

ASEM 2660 - Cinematic Storytelling (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Henry, Elizabeth
CRN: 1088
Course Description

The course acquaints students with basic concepts and methods used in the analysis of stories, the theoretical assumptions and models describing and justifying those concepts and models, and practical applications of story analysis in cinematic and script form. We begin with Aristotle, provide an interdisciplinary and historical overview of narratology, move to literary narrative analysis, and then focus on film-theoretical approaches while gaining practical skills in analysis of the elements of storytelling in fiction, film and television. In this way, students gain some historical perspectives on the form and function of story - its timeless prevalence as well as its more current iterations.

ASEM 2666 - Murder in America
M T W R06/16 - 07/031:00 pm to 4:30 pmPasko, Lisa
CRN: 1260
Course Description

This course draws on research from several perspectives in order to examine: (1) the definitions, scope, consequences and historical trends of homicide in America over the last century, including a case study investigation of why the murder rate dropped dramatically in New York City by the late 1990s; (2) past and current sociological/cultural and psychological explanations for lethal violence, including an in-depth look at serial, mass and spree killers; (3) crime policies and techniques aimed at reducing lethal violence, which entails a critical look at Three Strikes and You're Out laws aimed at violent offenders; and (4) media representations of homicide defendants and victims.

ASEM 2695 - Religion and Politics in China (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Willock, Nicole
CRN: 1065
Course Description

This course explores the concept of "religion" in the political history of modern China. Students gain new insight into two concurrent and divergent historical processes--state-driven secularization and religious revival--in China and Taiwan. Completion of all Common Curriculum requirements is required prior to registering for this class.

ASEM 2720 - Nazi Germany: History, Literature, Culture (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1460
Course Description

This course explores Germany's Nazi era. It focuses on themes like redemption, temptation, national community, conflict and memory while analyzing both texts and visuals from and related to the period. Prerequisite: Completion of all other Common Curriculum Requirements.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1707
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

ASEM 2734 - Music and Spirituality (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Taavola, Kristin
CRN: 1977
Course Description

At a time when "spiritual" music appears in a wide variety of contexts such as churches, yoga studios, raves, and radio broadcasts, "Music and Spirituality" explores individual and collective perspectives on music and transcendence, and teaches how a deeper understanding of those perspectives can lead to a broader view of meaning in human experience.

Analytical Inquiry: Natural & Physical World

Computer Science (COMP)
COMP 1101 - Analytical Inquiry I
Online06/16 - 07/18 Sherba, Susanne
CRN: 1714
Course Description

Students explore the use of mathematics and computer programming in creating animations. Students create animations on their laptop computers using animation software.

COMP 1101 - Analytical Inquiry I
Online06/16 - 07/18 Sherba, Susanne
CRN: 1956
Course Description

Students explore the use of mathematics and computer programming in creating animations. Students create animations on their laptop computers using animation software.

Mathematics (MATH)
MATH 1200 - Calculus for Business and Social Sciences (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M W R06/16 - 07/118:10 am to 11:30 amSobieczky, Florian
CRN: 1122
Course Description

This is a one-quarter course for students in business, social sciences, and liberal arts. It covers elementary differential calculus with emphasis on applications to business and the social sciences. Topics include functions, graphs, limits, continuity, differentiation, and mathematical models. Students are required to attend weekly labs.

MATH 1951 - Calculus I
Online06/16 - 07/18 Korf, Lisa
CRN: 1126
Course Description

Limits, continuity, differentiation of functions of one variable, applications of the derivative. Prerequisite: MATH 1750 or equivalent.

Analytical Inquiry: Society & Culture

Art History (ARTH)
ARTH 1070 - Artists on Film
M T W R06/16 - 07/038:10 am to 11:20 amWarlick, M.
CRN: 1455
Course Description

Artists with turbulent lives have often captured the popular imagination. Typically, novels, plays and films about such artists perpetuate myths of tormented souls overcoming hardships, enduring romantic catastrophes and struggling with their creative genius. Usually, the reality is quite different as an artist's path is one of developing talent, hard work, persistence and great personal courage. This class explores the lives and works of several famous artists. We evaluate the myths and the realities of their lives by comparing their art to films and documentaries that have been made about them.

Communication (COMN)
COMN 2210 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1219
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: What is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, we explore how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities "from the ground up." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with GWST 2212.

COMN 2210 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1220
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: What is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, we explore how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities "from the ground up." This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Cross listed with GWST 2212.

COMN 2220 - Race and Popular Culture (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Calafell, Bernadette
CRN: 1221
Course Description

This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality.

COMN 2220 - Race and Popular Culture (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Calafell, Bernadette
CRN: 1222
Course Description

This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality.

English (ENGL)
ENGL 1110 - Literary Inquiry: American Literature of the New West (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Stratton, Billy
CRN: 1279
Course Description

Literary Inquiry introduces students to the variety of ways that poetry, fiction, and/or drama expand our understanding of what it means to be human. Topics vary to engage students in the rewarding process of interpreting the literary art form as a unique cultural expression.

ENGL 1110 - Literary Inquiry: Mothers, Murderers, and Monks: The Gothic Tradition in 18th Century England (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Golightly, Jennifer
CRN: 1777
Course Description

Literary Inquiry introduces students to the variety of ways that poetry, fiction, and/or drama expand our understanding of what it means to be human. Topics vary to engage students in the rewarding process of interpreting the literary art form as a unique cultural expression.

ENGL 2130 - World Literature (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Nwosu, Michael Maik
CRN: 1281
Course Description

A literary journey around the world, the focus of this course includes the study of modern literature from different parts of the world--such as Africa and the Caribbean, Asia and the Middle East, Europe and the Americas. Textual analysis as well as cultural and transnational contexts are emphasized.

ENGL 2710 - American Novel-19th & 20th Century (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Davis, Clark
CRN: 1282
Gender and Women's Studies (GWST)
GWST 2212 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1462
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: what is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, the class explores how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities ?from the ground up.? This course is cross-listed with COMN 2210.

GWST 2212 - Gender, Communication, Culture (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Willink, Kate
CRN: 1463
Course Description

This course considers how gender is created, maintained, repaired, and transformed through communication in particular relational, cultural, social, and historical contexts. This course is designed to help students develop thoughtful answers to the following questions: what is gender, how do we acquire it, how do cultural structures and practices normalize and reproduce it, and how do we change and/or maintain it to better serve ourselves and our communities? Throughout the term, the class explores how dynamic communicative interactions create, sustain, and subvert femininities and masculinities ?from the ground up.? This course is cross-listed with COMN 2210.

German (GERM)
GERM 1416 - German Civilization: History, Politics, and Culture (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Wilms, Wilfried
CRN: 1115
Course Description

This course is an introduction to intellectual and cultural currents in German civilization from the Enlightenment to the present, emphasizing the arts in the context of history and philosophy from the late 18th century to around the mid-20th century. Readings include excerpts from such thinkers as Kant, Fichte, Marx, Nietzsche, Weber, as well as poetry and short fictional works by Heine, Junger, Remarque, Borchert, and others. The readings are supplemented by films that students are expected to have watched at the beginning of each week.

Greek (GREK)
GREK 1416 - Myths of Greece & Rome (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M T W R06/16 - 07/119:20 am to 11:40 amCastellani, Victor
CRN: 1116
Course Description

Introduction to the goddesses and gods, heroes and heroines, and not a few monstrosities from popular tradition, literature, and visual arts of the ancient Greeks and Romans. Activities include imaginative and creative assignments. No prerequisite.

History (HIST)
HIST 1350 - History of the British Empire (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M W F07/21 - 08/149:00 am to 12:20 pmKreider, Jodie
CRN: 1493
Course Description

This course explores the rise and fall of the British Empire from its origins during the English conquests of Wales, Scotland and Ireland; explorations of the world, through commercial expansion under the British East India Company; the rise of Britain as the preeminent world imperial power during the 19th century and its eventual decline and legacy during the late 20th century. Using a variety of secondary articles, primary sources, films and monographs, this course analyzes highly debated issues including the interconnected nature of British society and developments out in the Empire, both cultural and political; the important role that women, gender, and racial ideologies placed in British dominance of one quarter of the globe; how the empire and representations of Empire changed over the century; and finally, the impact of that empire upon issues of identity and population in a post-colonial Britain.

Media Film Journalism Studies (MFJS)
MFJS 2000 - Introduction to Film Criticism
M T W R06/16 - 07/031:00 pm to 4:20 pmBuxton, Rodney
CRN: 1089
Course Description

Theories and methods of social, cultural and aesthetic criticism of film; emphasis on critical writing. Laboratory fee required.

Philosophy (PHIL)
PHIL 2007 - Philosophy and Video Games (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Surber, Jere
CRN: 1074
Course Description

Traditional and novel metaphysical, ethical, political, and aesthetic issues both arising within video games and posed by this still developing medium. No prerequisites.

PHIL 2700 - Biomedical Ethics
M T W R07/21 - 08/079:20 am to 12:50 pmBrown, Jeffrey
CRN: 1506
Course Description

Discussion of some of the most pressing ethical issues engaged by contemporary developments in biology and medicine.

Religious Studies (RLGS)
RLGS 2202 - New Testament (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Robbins, Gregory
CRN: 1064
Course Description

This course takes a multifaceted approach (historical, literary, and critical) to the writings that comprise the Christian New Testament. The New Testament are read as a collection of primary documents that chronicle the primitive Church?s slow and often painful process of self-definition. In these writings it is possible to discern the tension that arose because of the strong religious and cultural ties early Christianity maintained with Palestinian Judaism, from which it emerged as a sectarian or reform movement. The careful reader also finds evidence of the new religion?s encounter with the Greco-Roman world from whose variegated ethos and culture it borrowed considerably on the way to becoming an important religious force in the first century. In exploring the New Testament, then, we attempt to recover something of the sense of what it meant to be a Christian in New Testament times. Cross listed with JUST 2202.

Spanish (SPAN)
SPAN 2300 - Iberian Culture & Civilization
Abroad07/29 - 08/23 Walter, Susan
CRN: 1120
Course Description

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

SPAN 2300 - Iberian Culture & Civilization
Abroad07/29 - 08/23 Torre, Javier
CRN: 1121
Course Description

Intensive study of culture of Spain; manifestations of culture found in history, art, architecture, music, literature, and politics of early and modern Spain. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent.

Theatre (THEA)
THEA 1810 - The Process of Theatre: Page to Stage
M T W R07/21 - 08/079:20 am to 12:40 pmMcDonald, Steven
CRN: 1261
Course Description

Exploration of the process playwrights, directors, actors, and designers use in creating a theatrical production. Individual sections may focus on single areas only?please see department for current offerings. In this course, students will demonstrate the ability to create or interpret the texts, ideas or artifacts of human culture. They will also identify and analyze the connections between these things and the human experience/perception of the world.

Language

Spanish (SPAN)
SPAN 1001 - Beginning Spanish
M T W R06/16 - 07/039:20 am to 12:30 pmTorre, Javier
CRN: 1117
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1002 - Beginning Spanish
M T W R07/07 - 07/259:20 am to 12:30 pmSantesteban, Sandra
CRN: 1118
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

SPAN 1003 - Beginning Spanish (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/149:20 am to 12:30 pmAdamo, Paula
CRN: 1119
Course Description

Basic grammar, syntax and vocabulary; emphasis on oral skills. Three quarter sequence.

Scientific Inquiry: Natural & Physical World

Biology (BIOL)
BIOL 1010 - Physiological Systems
M T W R07/07 - 07/2511:00 am to 1:50 pmMcIsaac, Hugh
CRN: 1158
Course Description

The second required course in the introductory biology sequence required for students majoring in Biology or another science. Emphasis on physiology and development of plants and animals. Must be a declared science major or biology minor. Co-requisite: BIOL 1020 lab section.

BIOL 1011 - Evolution, Heredity and Biodiversity
M T W R06/16 - 07/0311:00 am to 1:50 pmMorris, Julie
CRN: 1152
Course Description

The first required courses in the introductory biology sequence required for students majoring in Biology or another science. Emphasis on evolution, basic genetics and inheritance, and biodiversity. Must be a declared science major or biology minor. Co-requisite: BIOL 1021 lab section.

BIOL 1020 - Physiological Systems Lab
T R07/07 - 07/258:00 am to 10:50 amHebel, Angela
CRN: 1159
Course Description

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: BIOL 1010 lecture section.

BIOL 1021 - Evolution, Heredity and Biodiversity Lab
T R06/16 - 07/038:00 am to 10:50 amHebel, Angela
CRN: 1153
Course Description

Exercises and experimentation to complement lecture material. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: BIOL 1011 lecture section.

BIOL 1220 - Molecules to Humankind I
T R06/16 - 07/038:00 am to 10:50 amHebel, Angela,
Andrud, Kristin
M T W R06/16 - 07/0311:00 am to 12:50 pmHebel, Angela,
Andrud, Kristin
CRN: 1151
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors that examines the mechanisms that sustain life. Emphasis is placed on understanding the human body at the molecular, cellular and physiological levels. In the fall quarter our discussions start with the atom and basic chemistry. We next consider the properties of complex molecules, including DNA, proteins, carbohydrates and lipids, in order to see how such molecules are used and organized by living organisms. Our discussions of large and complex molecules lead naturally to the basic unit of life, the cell. Lab fee associated with this course.

BIOL 1221 - Molecules to Humankind II
T R07/07 - 07/258:00 am to 10:50 amAndrud, Kristin
M T W R07/07 - 07/2511:00 am to 12:50 pmAndrud, Kristin
CRN: 1157
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence for non-majors begins with an introduction to the general vertebrate body plan; we emphasize the human body plan but also compare it with other vertebrates. Discussions progress through the major organ and physiological systems of the body, including circulatory, respiratory, excretory, endocrine, nervous, skin, immune, reproductive, gastrointestinal, and skeletal and muscle systems. Discussions concentrate on the organization and function of these systems. Lab fee associated with this course.

BIOL 1222 - Molecules to Humankind III (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
T R07/28 - 08/148:00 am to 10:50 amMorris, Julie,
Andrud, Kristin
M T W R07/28 - 08/1411:00 am to 12:50 pmMorris, Julie,
Andrud, Kristin
CRN: 1160
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence focuses for non-majors on cell biology, genetics, and human reproduction and development. After a review of cell structure and function, focusing on how cells are capable of replication with modification, the mechanisms by which information is passed on from one cell to another and from one generation to the next are considered. The second half of the quarter concerns sexual reproduction and early development. Lab fee associated with this course.

Chemistry (CHEM)
CHEM 1010 - General Chemistry
M T W R F06/16 - 07/039:20 am to 11:20 amSwanson, Michael
CRN: 1094
Course Description

For natural science and engineering majors. Atomic and molecular structure, reactions in solution, thermochemistry and thermodynamics. Co-requisite: CHEM 1240.

CHEM 1240 - General Chemistry Lab
M T W R06/16 - 07/0312:00 pm to 3:00 pmMiller, Keith
CRN: 1095
Course Description

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 1010. Experiments illustrate aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and thermodynamics. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1010.

CHEM 1240 - General Chemistry Lab
M T W R06/16 - 07/0312:00 pm to 3:00 pmMiller, Keith
CRN: 1113
Course Description

Laboratory to accompany CHEM 1010. Experiments illustrate aspects of atomic structure, chemical bonding and thermodynamics. Lab fee associated with this course. This course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: The Natural and Physical World requirement. Co-requisite: CHEM 1010.

CHEM 2451 - Organic Chemistry I
M T W R F07/07 - 07/259:20 am to 11:20 amCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1103
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. Prerequisites: CHEM 1010 and CHEM 1240. Corequisite: CHEM 2461.

CHEM 2452 - Organic Chemistry II (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R F07/28 - 08/149:20 am to 11:20 amCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1104
Course Description

Structure and reactions of covalent compounds of carbon. Satisfies organic chemistry requirement in chemistry, biology and related fields. Prerequisite: CHEM 2451. Corequisite: CHEM 2462.

CHEM 2461 - Organic Chemistry Lab I
M T W R07/07 - 07/2512:00 pm to 3:30 pmCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1106
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2451.

CHEM 2462 - Organic Chemistry Lab II (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/1412:00 pm to 3:30 pmCowger, Teresa
CRN: 1107
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2452.

CHEM 2462 - Organic Chemistry Lab II (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/1412:00 pm to 3:30 pm 
CRN: 1108
Course Description

Laboratory course in theory and practice of preparative and analytical organic chemistry, including introduction to IR and NMR spectroscopy. Lab fee associated with this course. Co-requisite: CHEM 2452.

Geography (GEOG)
GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather
M T W R06/16 - 07/038:10 am to 10:20 amTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1162
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather
T W R06/16 - 07/0310:30 am to 12:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1163
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather
T W R06/16 - 07/0310:30 am to 12:20 pmTrigoso Rubio, Erika
CRN: 1164
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1201 - Environmental Systems: Weather (Full-term session—June 16-August 14)
Online06/16 - 08/14 Keables, Michael
CRN: 1165
Course Description

First class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; introduction to the fundamentals of the environmental system and the various processes that control weather and climate. The student will have a fundamental understanding of the basic components of the environmental system, familiarity with the role of energy in the atmosphere and its control over cycles of air temperature, a sound foundation in the mechanisms governing cloud formation and precipitation, a basic understanding of the atmospheric circulation and the storm systems which develop within it, and an introduction to the regional variation of climate. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology
M T W R07/07 - 07/258:10 am to 10:20 amFielding, Russell
CRN: 1166
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology
T W R07/07 - 07/2510:30 am to 12:20 pmFielding, Russell
CRN: 1167
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1202 - Environmental Systems: Hydrology
T W R07/07 - 07/2510:30 am to 12:20 pmFielding, Russell
CRN: 1168
Course Description

Second class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; the role of water in the environment. This course focuses on the matter and energy flows through the hydrologic cycles, together with the resulting spatial distribution and work of water. Various environmental issues concerning water including drought, water pollution, and human impacts on water supplies are included. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/148:10 am to 10:20 amSullivan, Donald
CRN: 1169
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
T W R07/28 - 08/1410:30 am to 12:20 pmSullivan, Donald
CRN: 1170
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course.

GEOG 1203 - Environmental Systems: Landforms (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
T W R07/28 - 08/1410:30 am to 12:20 pmSullivan, Donald
CRN: 1171
Course Description

Third class in a three-quarter sequence that introduces the fundamental processes that govern the physical environment; geological phenomena in various places in the world. Topics include maps and air photos; rocks and minerals; plate tectonics and volcanoes; landforms produced by wind, water, earth forces and ice; and biogeography. A lab fee is associated with this course.

Physics & Astronomy (PHYS)
PHYS 1111 - General Physics I
M T W R F07/07 - 07/259:20 am to 12:20 pmIona, Steven
CRN: 1127
Course Description

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Lab fee associated with this course.

PHYS 1111 - General Physics I
M W F07/07 - 07/251:00 pm to 3:00 pmIona, Steven
CRN: 1128
Course Description

This is the first of a three-quarter sequence for students majoring in any field. The course stresses physics concepts rather than equation derivation as in the calculus-based course (PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Algebra and trigonometry will be used regularly to solve problems and make predictions. Includes topics in mechanics (kinematics, dynamics) including forces, one and two dimensional motion, work, energy and momentum. The course includes a rigorous algebra-based laboratory that exposes students to a broad range of the real physical phenomena investigated using equipment as well as computerized instrumentation and data acquisition techniques. Prerequisites: high school algebra, trigonometry. (Note students majoring in physics or engineering are required to take PHYS 1211/PHYS 1212/PHYS 1213 or PHYS 1214). Lab fee associated with this course.

Scientific Inquiry: Society & Culture Writing & Rhetoric

Communication (COMN)
COMN 1210 - Foundations of Communication Studies (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Foust, Christina
CRN: 1527
Course Description

This course offers students an introduction to the study of communication. Students will explore the role of communication in domains that cut across the spectrum of human social life, from communication among individuals, to relationships, to marriage and families, to groups, to organizations, to communication at societal and global levels. In addition to focusing on the specific nature of communication in these distinct settings, students learn as well the different conceptual models for describing and understanding communication across these settings.

Economics (ECON)
ECON 1020 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics I: History and Theories (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Cole, Paula
CRN: 1226
Course Description

This course presents an introductory analysis of how the economic aspects of our society operate. We begin with a brief examination of the development of human economic arrangements and how these developed into the kind of economy we have today. We then look at some of the historical development of how people thought that economic activity works and how they thought it should work. Then we go into an examination of the workings of markets and economic competition--what we call micro-economics--by examining some of the relevant theory as well as its embodiment in developments in the U.S. economy. Following that, we examine in much more detail the theory and some current issues involved in what we call macro-economics--the study of the workings of the national economy as a whole, with its concerns to explain such matters as the national rates of unemployment and price inflation, along with a study of the monetary and financial aspects of the economy and the promises and problems of gender from many different directions.

ECON 1020 - Introduction to Micro- and Macroeconomics I: History and Theories (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M T W R07/21 - 08/148:10 am to 10:40 amUrquhart, Robert
CRN: 1227
Course Description

This course presents an introductory analysis of how the economic aspects of our society operate. We begin with a brief examination of the development of human economic arrangements and how these developed into the kind of economy we have today. We then look at some of the historical development of how people thought that economic activity works and how they thought it should work. Then we go into an examination of the workings of markets and economic competition--what we call micro-economics--by examining some of the relevant theory as well as its embodiment in developments in the U.S. economy. Following that, we examine in much more detail the theory and some current issues involved in what we call macro-economics--the study of the workings of the national economy as a whole, with its concerns to explain such matters as the national rates of unemployment and price inflation, along with a study of the monetary and financial aspects of the economy and the promises and problems of gender from many different directions.

Gender and Women's Studies (GWST)
GWST 1112 - Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies
M W F07/07 - 07/259:20 am to 1:40 pmGordon, Hava
CRN: 1230
Course Description

This course provides an introduction to the discipline of gender and women's studies. All cultures engage in a complex process of assigning cultural values and social roles which vary according to the cultural environment in which human interaction occurs. Among these, the process of translating biological differences into a complex system of gender remains one of the most important. Gender and women's studies aims to understand how this process of 'gendering' occurs, and its larger effects in society. This course also explores how this system of meaning relates to other systems of allocating power, including socioeconomic class, social status, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and nationality. Using this lens, this course explores contemporary social developments and problems. Gender and women's studies is about studying, but it is also about meaningful engagement with the world. This class presents students with a variety of types of texts from sociological articles to literary fictions and documentary and fictional cinema to explore gender from many different directions.

Geography (GEOG)
GEOG 1410 - People, Places & Landscapes (3-week sequence 3 —July 28-August 14)
M T W R07/28 - 08/142:10 pm to 5:30 pmTaylor, Matthew
CRN: 1447
Course Description

In this course, students will study the location of people and activities across the surface of the Earth. Describing the locations and patterns of human activity only lays the foundation for exploring how and why such patterns have developed historically, and how they relate to the natural environment and other aspects of human behavior.

GEOG 2500 - Sustainability & Human Society
T R06/16 - 07/178:10 am to 12:10 pmLavanchy, Gary
CRN: 1173
Course Description

Sustainability has become a catch phrase in discussions concerning the long-term viability of a number of phenomena, from the environment to the economy. Sustainability is commonly defined as meeting the needs of the current generation without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their needs. Students are introduced to issues inherent in discussions of sustainability. The major areas of focus include definitions of ecological and environmental sustainability, economic and political sustainability, and social justice, and various metrics used to assess sustainable behavior and practices. Students study the theory, principles and practices of sustainability, and participate in discussion and writing exercises based on lecture and readings.

Psychology (PSYC)
PSYC 1001 - Foundations of Psychological Science (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Miller, Pamela
CRN: 1263
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of mind and behavior. It includes topics such as the biological basis of behavior, the developmental transitions from infancy through old age, the principles underlying perception, learning and memory, and the ways in which behavior is affected by its physical, social, and cultural context.

PSYC 1001 - Foundations of Psychological Science
Online07/14 - 08/14 Reichmann-Decker, Aimee
CRN: 1905
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the scientific study of mind and behavior. It includes topics such as the biological basis of behavior, the developmental transitions from infancy through old age, the principles underlying perception, learning and memory, and the ways in which behavior is affected by its physical, social, and cultural context.

Sociology (SOCI)
SOCI 1810 - Understanding Social Life
M T W R06/16 - 07/049:20 am to 12:50 pmColomy, Paul
CRN: 1252
Course Description

This course is an introduction to the discipline of sociology and to the insights it provides into the human condition.

SOCI 2250 - Criminology
Online06/16 - 07/18 Del Rosso, Jared
CRN: 1253
Course Description

Social meaning of criminal behavior; relationship between crime and society in particular, how production and distribution of economic, political and cultural resources shape construction of law, order and crime; different types of crime, criminals and victims, and efforts to understand and control them.

Writing

Writing (WRIT)
WRIT 1122 - Rhetoric and Academic Writing (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
M W F06/16 - 07/111:00 pm to 3:40 pmTaczak, Kara
CRN: 1830
Course Description

On completing this course, students are expected to have enhanced the following knowledge and skills: analytic and critical reading strategies; a basic understanding of rhetorical situations and rhetorical analysis; the ability to write for specific audiences and discourse communities, using effective conversations for these situations; the ability to write texts that are organized, coherent and substantive, demonstrating rhetorical, linguistic design and analytical competence. The course provides instruction and practice in academic and civic writing for well-educated readers. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as additional exercises. Final portfolio.

WRIT 1122 - Rhetoric and Academic Writing (4-week session 1—June 16-July 11)
Online06/16 - 07/11 Colby, Richard
CRN: 1831
Course Description

On completing this course, students are expected to have enhanced the following knowledge and skills: analytic and critical reading strategies; a basic understanding of rhetorical situations and rhetorical analysis; the ability to write for specific audiences and discourse communities, using effective conversations for these situations; the ability to write texts that are organized, coherent and substantive, demonstrating rhetorical, linguistic design and analytical competence. The course provides instruction and practice in academic and civic writing for well-educated readers. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as additional exercises. Final portfolio.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
M W F07/21 - 08/141:00 pm to 3:40 pmParrish, Juli
CRN: 1832
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

WRIT 1133 - Writing and Research (4-week session 2—July 21-August 14)
Online07/21 - 08/14 Chapman-Ludwig, April
CRN: 1833
Course Description

This course builds on the writing and rhetorical skills learned in WRIT 1122 by shifting attention from general rhetorical strategies to specific rhetorical strategies that shape different kinds of academic inquiry. Through introduction to quantitative, qualitative, and textual research traditions, students identify how written reasoning varies in terms of the questions posed, the kind of evidence used to answer them, and the nature of the audience or forum for the result. In addition, the course teaches how to shape research into substantive academic arguments, with attention to the ethical consequences of their rhetorical choices. Students are asked to develop further their linguistic, design, and reasoning competencies, with added consideration of citation conventions. Students complete at least 20 pages of revised and polished writing, in multiple assignments, as well as numerous additional exercises, in projects requiring library-based research as well as other types. Final portfolio. Prerequisite: WRIT 1122.

About online courses 

Many of our summer courses will be offered online, which means that you can take the course from anywhere as long as you have reliable access to the Internet. Most of these courses are condensed, which means that the courses are very intensive, often requiring you to spend 20 hours per week on the course. If you plan to enroll in an online course, please visit the FAQ page for important information about online courses.

Interterm Courses

Interterm courses are another option for students interested in taking summer classes. Scholarships may be available for eligible students. Apply online for scholarships.