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Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

Department of Psychology

Psychology Matters

Research and Teaching Matters

research

Five new faculty will join us to advance psychological science in research and teaching. As you will read below, these outstanding scholars are already making their mark in affective, child clinical, and developmental science. They each bring an approach to research that values integration and collaboration at a time of incredible growth in our Department. They also share a commitment to developing the next generation of leaders in psychological science, which will they will bring to life in teaching and mentoring across our undergraduate program, which serves about 500 majors, and three graduate programs.

In September 2018, we will welcome:

  • Paige Lloyd, Assistant Professor. Graduating from Miami University with a PhD in Social Psychology, her research investigates the determinants and consequences of person perception with an emphasis on implications for social inequality and discrimination. She will contribute to the Affective, Social, and Cognitive graduate program by bringing expertise in intergroup relations, social inequality, stereotypes, prejudice and discrimination, face and body perception, and interpersonal sensitivity (such as lie detection, pain detection, smile authenticity, emotion recognition).
  • Dr. Erika Manczak, Assistant Professor. Dr. Manczak received her PhD in Clinical Psychology from Northwestern University before taking up a postdoctoral fellowship at Stanford University. Her research examines the biological and psychological mechanisms through which important social relationships during childhood and adolescence confer risk for mental and physical health disorders. She will join the Child Clinical graduate program and SEED Center, applying her expertise in developmental psychopathology, biological embedding of social experiences, depression in parents, children, and adolescents, parent-child relationships, psychoimmunology, and mental and physical health comorbidity.
  • Dr. Michelle Rozenman, Assistant Professor. Dr. Rozenman has been an Assistant Clinical Professor in the Division of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry at the UCLA David Geffen School of Medicine since 2016. She received her PhD from the Joint Doctoral Program in Clinical Psychology at San Diego State University and University of California, San Diego. Her research centers on understanding processes that underlie anxiety in children and adolescents in order to develop theoretically and practically efficient interventions. Dr. Rozenman will contribute to the Child Clinical graduate program, bring expertise in youth anxiety and obsessive-compulsive disorder, cognitive and psychophysiological processes underlying anxiety, and intervention development and implementation in health settings.
  • Daniel Storage, Teaching Assistant Professor. Finishing his doctorate in developmental psychology from the University of Illinois, he brings experience teaching a variety of introductory and advanced courses in general psychology, child psychology, research methods, statistics. To this teaching role, he will bring his expertise in stereotypes, prejudice, discrimination, gender, racial bias, under-representation of women and African Americans in higher education, and improving psychological methods and replicability.

In September 2019, Dr. Jenalee Doom will join us in after she wraps up her postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Michigan Center for Human Growth and Development. She received her PhD from the University of Minnesota in Child Psychology. Dr. Doom's research focuses on the biological and behavioral mechanisms by which childhood stress, such as maltreatment and poverty, influences mental and physical health across the lifespan. She will contribute to the Developmental graduate program as well as the SEED Research Center, applying her expertise in developmental psychopathology, developmental health psychology, stress physiology, early adversity and trauma, resilience, nutrition, and cardiometabolic health.