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College of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences

Department of Sociology & Criminology

Pasko

Faculty & Staff

Casey Stockstill

Casey Stockstill

Casey Stockstill

Assistant Professor
Sturm Hall 442
Phone: 303-871-2253
Email: [email protected]
View CV

 

 

 

areas of expertise/research interests


Aging and the Life Course; Childhood; Research Methods; Poverty; Preschool; Race, Class & Gender; Social Psychology 

professional biography


Casey Stockstill is an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology and Criminology at the University of Denver. Her research investigates race, class, and gender inequalities in various contexts. Dr. Stockstill conducted a two-year ethnography in segregated Wisconsin preschools. This work details daily inequalities in how children experience space, time, and peer and teacher relationships. In a second line of work, Dr. Stockstill conducts experiments to investigate how different racial signals—like skin tone, asserted racial identity, and racialized names—produce micro-level prejudice. Finally, Dr. Stockstill is beginning a second major project that uses historical archives to trace people’s perceptions of Black and Mexican children’s social value between 1880-1930.  

For more details about her work, see her website: caseystockstill.com.

education


PhD   Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
MA    Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
BA     Sociology, Columbia University

selected publications


Stockstill, Casey. 2018. “Does Asserting A Non-Black Identity Elicit More Positive Evaluations? White Observers’ Reactions to Black, Biracial, Multiracial, And White Job Applicants.” Sociological Perspectives 61(1): 126-144. https://doi.org/10.1177/0731121417702129 

Fallon, Katherine and Casey Stockstill. 2018. “The Condensed Courtship Clock: How Elite Women Manage Self-Development and Marriage Ideals.” Socius: Sociological Research for a Dynamic World 4(Feb):1-14. https://doi.org/10.1177/2378023117753485 

*Winner of the 2017 Outstanding Graduate Student Paper Award, ASA Section on Aging and the Life Course