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The Cultural Center

Panoram view of DU campus and mountains in background, with The Cultural Center name across bottom

The Cultural Center

The Student Spotlight

 

 DU CODE SWITCH ~ Student Newsletter Undergraduate and Graduate

The Cultural Center aspires to make The Cultural Center and Spiritual more community base, providing a platform for students in the DU community to share their ideas and stories.  We are proud to introduce the DU Cultural Center and Spiritual Life's inaugural (excuse my code-switching) newsletter, DU Code Switch. Code-Switching is an essential skill marginalized communities utilize to thrive in predominately white institutions. We wanted to highlight students' perspectives in our DU community. Just in case, here is a video explaining what code-switching is, https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QNbdn0yuUw8&t=8s . Created by Brianna Makumbi a junior Marketing and International Studies! 

DU CODE SWITCH NEWSLETTER

Read the latest edition!                  Code Switch June

DU CODE Switch The Podcast

Do you want here the full story, get an insiders perspective on the stories from our newsletter. This podcast was inspired from "Jemele Hill is Unbothered," we will share the interviews with fellow students who are featured in the podcast. This was made for us and by us and you will be tuning in every month to here the joy, the risks, and the triumphs of our community. Coming soon in Fall 2020 is the new DU CODE Switch The Podcast. 

                                                                     Quarantine Good Reads

 

Deep but Important

In Order to Live by Yeonmi Park:

Book In Order to LiveYeonmi Park has told the harrowing story of her escape from North Korea as a child many times, but never before has she revealed the most intimate and devastating details of the repressive society she was raised in and the enormous price she paid to escape.   Park's family was loving and close-knit, but life in North Korea was brutal, practically medieval. Park would regularly go without food and was made to believe that, Kim Jong Il, the country's dictator, could read her mind. After her father was imprisoned and tortured by the regime for trading on the black-market, a risk he took in order to provide for his wife and two young daughters, Yeonmi and her family were branded as criminals and forced to the cruel margins of North Korean society. With thirteen-year-old Park suffering from a botched appendectomy and weighing a mere sixty pounds, she and her mother were smuggled across the border into China.

No More Cosmopolitan Magazine Love Advice, Please!

All About Love BY bell hooks:

All about love bell hooks

All About Love is a revelation about what causes a polarized society and how to heal the divisions that cause suffering. Here is the truth about love, and inspiration to help us instill caring, compassion, and strength in our homes, schools, and workplaces.
"The word 'love' is most often defined as a noun, yet we would all love better if we used it as a verb," writes bell hooks as she comes out fighting and on fire in All About Love. Here, at her most provocative and intensely personal, renowned scholar, cultural critic and feminist bell hooks offers a proactive new ethic for a society bereft with lovelessness--not the lack of romance, but the lack of care, compassion, and unity. People are divided, she declares, by society's failure to provide a model for learning to love.
As bell hooks uses her incisive mind to explore the question "What is love?" her answers strike at both the mind and heart. Razing the cultural paradigm that the ideal love is infused with sex and desire, she provides a new path to love that is sacred, redemptive, and healing for individuals and for a nation. The Utne Reader declared bell hooks one of the "100 Visionaries Who Can Change Your Life." All About Love is a powerful, timely affirmation of just how profoundly her revelations can change hearts and minds for the better.

The Truth The Crime

Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City by Tanya Talaga

Seven fallen feathersThe shocking true story covered by the Guardian and the New York Times of the seven young Indigenous students who were found dead in a northern Ontario city.   In 1966, twelve-year-old Chanie Wenjack froze to death on the railway tracks after running away from residential school. An inquest was called and four recommendations were made to prevent another tragedy. None of those recommendations were applied.  More than a quarter of a century later, from 2000 to 2011, seven Indigenous high school students died in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The seven were hundreds of miles away from their families, forced to leave home and live in a foreign and unwelcoming city. Five were found dead in the rivers surrounding Lake Superior, below a sacred Indigenous site. Jordan Wabasse, a gentle boy and star hockey player, disappeared into the minus twenty degrees Celsius night. The body of celebrated artist Norval Morrisseau's grandson, Kyle, was pulled from a river, as was Curran Strang's. Robyn Harper died in her boarding-house hallway and Paul Panacheese inexplicably collapsed on his kitchen floor. Reggie Bushie's death finally prompted an inquest, seven years after the discovery of Jethro Anderson, the first boy whose body was found in the water. 

A portion of each sale of Seven Fallen Feathers will go to the Dennis Franklin Cromarty Memorial Fund, set up in 1994 to financially assist Nishnawbe Aski Nation students' studies in Thunder Bay and at post-secondary institutions. Further donations can be made to: http://www.cromartyfund.ca.

The Other Side of the Story

Apples Are from Kazakhstan: The Land That Disappeared  by Christopher Robbins

A funny and revealing travelogue of Kazakhstan, a country rich with wild tulips, oil, nomads who hunt with golden eagles, and a disappearing landlocked sea. Closed to foreigners under Tsar and Soviet rule, Kazakhstan has remained largely hidden from the world, a remarkable feat for a country the size of Western Europe. Few would guess that Kazakhstan—a blank in Westerners' collective geography—turns out to be diverse, tolerant, and surprisingly modern, the country that gave the world apples, trousers, and even, perhaps, King Arthur. 

*Snap Snap*

 My Time Among the Whites: Notes from an Unfinished Education by Jennine Capó Crucet

My Time Among the Whites

In this sharp and candid collection of essays, critically acclaimed writer and first-generation American Jennine Capó Crucet explores the condition of finding herself a stranger in the country where she was born. Raised in Miami and the daughter of Cuban refugees, Crucet examines the political and personal contours of American identity and the physical places where those contours find themselves smashed: be it a rodeo town in Nebraska, a university campus in upstate New York, or Disney World in Florida. Crucet illuminates how she came to see her exclusion from aspects of the theoretical American Dream, despite her family's attempts to fit in with white American culture―beginning with their ill-fated plan to name her after the winner of the Miss America pageant.

A Rare but Cute Kind of Love Story

Let's Talk About Love  by Claire Kann

Let's Talk About Love

Striking a perfect balance between heartfelt emotions and spot-on humor, this YA debut features a pop-culture enthusiast protagonist with an unforgettable voice sure to resonate with readers.  Alice had her whole summer planned. Nonstop all-you-can-eat buffets while marathoning her favorite TV shows (best friends totally included) with the smallest dash of adulting―working at the library to pay her share of the rent. The only thing missing from her perfect plan? Her girlfriend (who ended things when Alice confessed, she's asexual). Alice is done with dating―no thank you, do not pass go, stick a fork in her, done.    But then Alice meets Takumi and she can't stop thinking about him or the rom com-grade romance feels she did not ask for (uncertainty, butterflies, and swoons, oh my!).  When her blissful summer takes an unexpected turn and Takumi becomes her knight with a shiny library-employee badge (close enough), Alice has to decide if she's willing to risk their friendship for a love that might not be reciprocated―or understood.