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DU/Iliff Joint PhD Program in the Study of Religion

Students Certificate in Latino Studies

Certificate Program

Latinx Studies

Highlighting our commitment to diversity and our celebration of inclusive excellence, the DU/Iliff Joint PhD Program in the Study of Religion offers a 24 credit hour certificate program in Latinx Studies as part of the 90 credit hour PhD. Guided by faculty at both DU and Iliff, students consider questions of Latinx histories and culture from a theological and religious studies perspective and engage directly with Latinx communities through a variety of field placement and outreach opportunities. The main objective of the program is to prepare students to teach Latinx Studies, focusing on religion, theology, and social praxis.

CORE FACULTY

Dr. Rubén Arjona, Assistant Professor of Pastoral Care and Theology, Iliff School of Theology

Dr. Miguel De La Torre, Professor of Social Ethics and Latinx Studies, Iliff School of Theology

Dr. Albert Hernández , Associate Professor of the History of Christianity, Iliff School of Theology, Iliff School of Theology

Dr. Luís León , Professor, University of Denver, Department of Religious Studies (Certificate Coordinator)

Dr. Debora Ortega , Professor, University of Denver Graduate School of Social Work; Director, University of Denver Latino Center for Community Engagement and Scholarship

CERTIFICATE REQUIREMENTS

Students must submit an application and be accepted into the certificate program. Each student in the program must complete 24 credit hours of approved courses, including a 4 credit field placement assignment within a Latinx community service setting approved by the Latinx Certificate Coordinator. In some cases, the field placement may be replaced by an intensive Latin American immersion equivalent. In addition to the coursework, students must demonstrate competency in Spanish language as evidenced by passing a Spanish qualifying exam or by successfully completing a course in the 2000-level Spanish-speaking course sequence with a grade of B or better. These undergraduate classes will not count toward the 90-hour degree, and financial aid may not be applied to them. Upon completion of coursework, one comprehensive exam will be on the topic of Latinx Religion, Theology, or Ethics. The student will write a dissertation on a topic of Latinx Religion, Theology, or Ethics, and at least one dissertation committee member must also be Latinx Certificate faculty.

required COURSES

RLGS 4676, LATINA/O RELIGIOUS CULTURES: TEXTS, METHODS, AND THEORIES
    Within recent years scholars have begun to introduce cultural studies models into religious studies research to sharpen understanding of distinct racial(ized) religious expressions within the U.S. as cultural products. This seminar explores this fresh modeling by focusing on Latinos. Hence, the goals of this course are twofold. First to deepen familiarity with the major traditions that constitute Latino religiosity while understanding the questions and categories germane to both cultural and religious studies. Ultimately, students will be asked to incorporate these methods and theories into their own analytical repertoire.
RLGN 4608 / THEO 6xxx: LATINA/O THEOLOGY AND ETHICS
    This course will examine the work of four key Latina/o theologians, and four Latina/o ethicists. Students will be required to familiarize themselves with the main ideas, issues, debates and thinkers working within these fields.

Elective Courses- Choose 12 credit hours

RLGN 4505 / THEO 6421: SPANISH MYSTICS AND REFORMERS

This course will examine the works of mystics and reformers such as Teresa of Avila, John of the Cross, Ignatius of Loyola, Juan de Valdes and others. This seminar also discusses the influence of these sixteenth century religious movements on Latin American history and the culture of the American Southwest under Spain's colonial rejection of these pluralistic legacies while defining a new national identity.

SOWK 4750: ISSUES AND PERSPECTIVES IN THE LATINA/O CONTEXT

Teaches Spanish language competency from a power, privilege, and oppression perspective. It really is Spanish for helpers. We have intermediate and advanced levels.

SOWK 4751 GLOBAL RELATIONS AND POVERTY IN MEXICO

This is a course that takes place in Mexico. This course utilizes a power, privilege, and oppression approach to understanding the experience of Mexican immigrants and how change occurs among oppressed peoples. The Christian based community movement is addressed in this course.

SOWK 4749 INTERVENTIONS WITH LATINA/O FAMILIES
    Addresses immigration issues, as well as intervention and theoretical approaches for Latinos/as. Covers the selection of interventions and strategies for cross-cultural use in adequately addressing the needs of Latinos/as. This course addresses intervention techniques that are culturally appropriate given the culture and experience of Latino families.
SOWK 4757: SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT IN LATIN AMERICA
    Discusses the intersection of US policy and Latin America. NGOs, the World Bank, NAFTA and the effects of Latin American are addressed.
HED 4287: CRITICAL RACE THEORY & EDUCATION
    The purpose of this course is to provide students with an in-depth exposure to Critical Race Theory (CRT) as it pertains to education. Critical Race Theory is an analytical framework that provides race-based epistemological, methodological, and pedagogical approaches to the study of everyday inequalities in P-20 education. (3 credits)
RLGN 4401 / THEO 6304: RACE, GENDER, CLASS: HISTORICAL & SOCIAL SCIENTIFIC ANALYSIS OF INDIVIDUAL, INSTITUTIONAL AND SYSTEMIC RACISM IN THE MODERN WORLD
    An historical survey of the role of racism, sexism and classism in shaping the oppressive institutional structures of the existing world order and of how sociological analysis of these structures can help justice and peace activists direct effective action toward the elimination of race, gender and class oppression. Offered annually as a required Justice and Peace Proseminar. (4 credits)
RLGN 4402 / THEO 6318: AMERICAN INDIAN CULTURES AND RELIGIOUS TRADITIONS
    A survey of the world views of Native American people as these pertain to both inter-tribal beliefs and Native American ceremonial life, with an attempt to show how Native American practice proceeds from their world view. (4 credits)
RLGN 5401 / THEO 6305: POST-COLONIAL AND OTHER MYTHS: A THEOLOGICAL CRITIQUE OF DOMINANCE
    Post-Colonialism refers to the discourses emerging from the inhabitants of once colonized nations who advance movements toward de-colonization, including neo-colonialists movements. This colloquium explores the intersection of decolonizing narratives with religious discourses, offering a theological critique of dominance. Among the questions we will ask is what is the relationship between colonialisms and religions? How have religious myths and rituals established a divine right to rule? How has religious narration destabilized theological orthodoxies establishing a mandate and legitimacy for servitude? How has race and theological anthropology factored into colonizing and de-colonizing practices?
 RLGN 4204 / THEO 6217: MULTI-CULTURAL PASTORAL CARE & COUNSELING
    Examines multicultural issues in pastoral care and counseling and explores the dynamics and complexities of culture, race and other socializing factors in pastoral care conversations. (4 credits)

Community Service/Field Placement

Latinx Studies is an academic pursuit grounded in an understanding of the realities existing within a specific community, both historical and contemporary. Consequently, students in the Latinx certificate program are required to complete a 4-credit hour field placement within a Latinx church or other community service organization. Service in the community is intended to provide students with first-hand experience in the cultures, traditions, and experiences of a Latinx population. The specific placement is arranged in consultation with the Latinx Certificate Coordinator.