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Campus Life & Inclusive Excellence

Health & Counseling Center

Health Promotion

Peer Education at DU HCC

Peer Education within the Health and Counseling Center's Department of Health Promotion is made up of two teams: the Intervene Peer Educators and the Thrive Peer Health Educators. Each team employs 10 peer educators annually. Learn more about each of the programs and how to get involved below!

Intervene Peer Educators

Intervene: DU logoThe Intervene Peer Educators are a select group of students who educate the DU community on gender violence prevention and active bystander skills through outreach, programs, and training. Intervene Intervene Peer Educators receive over 40 hours of professional development training in gender violence and trauma topics, inclusive excellence practice, and effective facilitation.

Intervene Peer Educators facilitate "Intervene: DU," the active bystander trainings for all new, incoming first year students as well as the "Unpacking Gender Violence" training for returning students, in addition to other trainings requested by the DU community at large. The position is a 1 year commitment, with offers typically extended to students who are not graduating (i.e., you can return to this position as a junior, senior, etc).

View the full position description here. Information about applying can be found under the "Interested in Becoming a Peer Educator?" tab below.

Meet the Intervene Peer Educators!

  • Courtney Cuff

    Courtney Cuff

    Intervene Peer Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Psychology, Gender and Women's Studies

    Personal Interests: Netflix, doing yoga, and spending time with friends

    Why I became an Intervene Peer Educator: I became a peer educator because I think it is our responsibility as students on this campus and people in general to watch out for each other and I want to be a part of giving others the tools to do so.

    Favorite way to intervene: I think my favorite moments intervening come when I can step in when people make a problematic comment and I can see that by saying something I was able to help them stop and think and will hopefully influence their actions in the future.

  • Gracie Jacobson

    Gracie Jacobson

    Intervene Peer Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Theatre, Finance

    Personal Interests: Running, playing guitar, big fan of old horror movies

    Why I became an Intervene Peer Educator: I believe awareness and the spreading of information is an effective way to encourage intervening.

    Favorite way to intervene: Sticking close to my friends if they look like someone is making them uncomfortable so the other person knows I’m there.

  • OPEN

    Isabella Kent

    Intervene Peer Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Psychology, Gender & Women's Studies

    Personal Interests: I love hiking and being outside.

    Why I became an Intervene Peer Educator: I am passionate about creating change in my own community.

    Favorite way to intervene: My favorite way to intervene is directly addressing the issue at hand by approaching people as a friend, with care.

  • JJ Khan

    JJ Khan

    Intervene Peer Educator

    Pronouns: He/Him/His

    Major: Psychology, Socio-Legal Studies

    Personal Interests: Soccer, movies, crossword puzzles

    Why I became an Intervene Peer Educator: I believe in how powerful peer intervention can be and I see it as more important than ever on our campus and across the World as a whole when it comes to issues surrounding identity-based bias and violence. I hope to utilize my identities and experiences to empower my peers to intervene in difficult situations as well.

    Favorite way to intervene: While out at a party Freshman or Sophomore year, I noticed two individuals that I was concerned about. I went over to see if they were doing alright and much to my delight, they both stated that they were fine and were super appreciative of my concern. It was really cool to have that validation and realize how appreciative intervening is on our campus.

  • Kate Maegly

    Kate Maegly

    Intervene Peer Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Psychology, Communication Studies

    Personal Interests: Yoga, reading, movies, cooking

    Why I became an Intervene Peer Educator: I wanted to be able to make a positive difference in our DU community by getting the word out about bystander intervention, something I wholeheartedly believe in.

    Favorite way to intervene: I really love moments when I am able to help someone realize that a behavior being perpetrated against them is not okay and being able to guide them through all the options they have of how to improve the situation.

  • Ken Fowler

    Ken Fowler

    Intervene Peer Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: International Studies

    Personal Interests: Hiking, camping, painting and fitness

    Why I became an Intervene Peer Educator: I became an Intervene Peer Educator because I believe in what the Intervene course teaches and that the access to such information for our community has the power to change culture surrounding sexual assault, mental health, alcohol and drug abuse as well as other important topics.

    Favorite way to intervene: My favorite way of intervention is group intervention. I love seeing a group of people working together to stand up for what is right and putting a stop to harmful behaviors on our campus.

  • Kayla Franklin

    Kayla Franklin

    Intervene Peer Educator

    Pronouns: They/Them/Theirs

    Major: Sociology, minors in Spanish, Gender & Women's Studies

    Personal Interests: Wire wrapping crystals, yoga, hiking, writing, spending time with family and friends

    Why I became an Intervene Peer Educator: I decided to become an Intervene Peer Educator because gender violence is a very prevalent issue among U.S. universities and has personally impacted both mine and many of my peers' lives. I just want to help change a culture that normalizes gender violence and allows for it to continue.

    Favorite way to intervene: My favorite type of intervention is when I don't even have to intervene, because my presence in a room is enough for people to correct themselves. On several occasions I have witness people correcting their use of derogatory terms simply because I was there and they knew I would say something if they did not.

  • Lois Shih

    Lois Shih

    Intervene Peer Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Theatre, Communication Studies, minors in Leadership Studies, Chinese

    Personal Interests: Coffee, long romantic walks (indoors), and crying over Meryl Streep

    Why I became an Intervene Peer Educator: At its simplest level, I care about people. I think it's basic human decency to look out for one another and it's not enough, nor okay, to be a passive bystander.

    Favorite way to intervene: THE CHIP GUY. If you don't know about the Chip Guy, please YouTube him. Classic.

  • Paige Otto

    Paige Otto

    Intervene Peer Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Socio-Legal Studies, Public Policy

    Personal Interests: A capella (in the on campus all female group!), musical theatre, yoga

    Why I became an Intervene Peer Educator: To be a part of this impetus for change.

    Favorite way to intervene: Sitting down with someone and explaining to them why something that’s been said to them is problematic and they are valid in feeling how they are.

Thrive Peer Health Educators

Thrive Peer Health Educators logoThrive Peer Health Educators are a select group of student leaders who promote the health of the DU campus community through inclusive education and engagement. As part of the HCC Health Promotion team, Thrive Peer Health Educators develop programs and implement outreach efforts regarding sexual health, mental health, and alcohol and other drug topics. In addition, Thrive Peer Health Educators serve as HCC ambassadors, as well as liaisons between the DU community and health professionals. This paid position is a 1 year commitment, typically working 30-40 hours per quarter along with a 20 hour mandatory Spring training requirement.

View the full position description here. Information about applying can be found under the "Interested in Becoming a Peer Educator?" tab below.

Meet the Thrive Peer Health Educators!

  • Austin Johnson

    Austin Johnson

    Thrive Peer Health Educator

    Pronouns: He/Him/His

    Major: Biology; Minors: Psychology, Medical Physics, & Leadership

    Public Health Interests: Medicine, dual degree MPH/MS

    Personal Interests: Fitness/nutrition, sci-fi movies, anything technology, foodie

    What health means to me: Health means a sound body and mind that are synchronized in a way that allows one to pursue their dreams unencumbered by sickness, fear, or anxiety.

  • Jane Zunamon

    Jane Zunamon

    Thrive Peer Health Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Strategic Communication & Art

    Public Health Interests: Mental healthcare

    Personal Interests: Soccer & jigsaw puzzles

    What health means to me: Health means to care for yourself mentally and physically in a positive way.

  • Julia Norton

    Julia Norton

    Thrive Peer Health Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Psychology; Minor: English

    Public Health Interests: Mental health & sexual health

    Personal Interests: Skiing, hiking, and making art

    Why I'm interested in health education: I am interested in health education because I am particularly passionate about mental health advocacy and education.

  • Kate Petty

    Kate Petty

    Thrive Peer Health Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Molecular Biology; Minors: Math & Chemistry

    Public Health Interests: Mental health advocacy

    Personal Interests: CrossFit, painting, knitting, flute, cooking, hiking, Star Trek, elephants

    What health means to me: Being able to live without any physical, mental, social, or emotional problems that limit what a person would normally do. And finding a sustainable balance between these four areas in life.

  • Maddy Klaysmat

    Maddy Klaysmat

    Thrive Peer Health Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Molecular Biology; Minors: Psychology, Chemistry, & Spanish

    Public Health Interests: Sexual & mental health

    Personal Interests: Hiking, camping, traveling

    Why I'm interested in health education: I think it is very important that everyone has all the information and knowledge to live a healthy life. I've noticed many gaps in the DU community and would like to do my part in helping give people the education they need to be healthy and successful.

  • Naitra Ramchander

    Naitra Ramchander

    Thrive Peer Health Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Majors: Molecular Biology & Psychology; Minors: Chemistry, Leadership, and Gender & Women's Studies

    Public Health Interests: Mental health, women's health, sexual health

    Personal Interests: Hiking/backpacking, traveling, reading

    Why I'm interested in health education: I believe that it is so important for students to be aware of their resources that are available to them and to utilize these resources to better themselves.

  • Rae Woody

    Rae Woody

    Thrive Peer Health Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Psychology; Minor: Sociology & Communication

    Public Health Interests: Health inequities and public health

    Personal Interests: Playing softball and chess

    Why I'm interested in health education: I am interested in health education because it has many factors that aren't just limited to medical services but includes social engagement and outreach.

  • Victoria Rubio

    Victoria Rubio

    Thrive Peer Health Educator

    Pronouns: She/Her/Hers

    Major: Bio Chemistry; Minors: Psychology, Math, & Medical Physics

    Public Health Interests: Mental health

    Personal Interests: Skiing & painting

    What health means to me: Health means maintaining a balance of life choices for your mind and body in order to feel your best.

Interested in Becoming a Peer Educator?

Both Peer Educator teams interview and hire new members in the Winter quarter. To apply, you will fill out an online application. If you are selected for an interview, a staff person from Health Promotion will reach out to set up an in-person interview with you. Once you complete the interview, a decision will be made and someone from Health Promotion will let you know if you've been hired!

Check out the info below to learn more about the specific hiring process for each team and to submit your application!

Intervene Peer Educators

Do you want to educate your peers and end gender and power-based violence on our campus? Would you like to develop effective facilitation skills and further your social justice development? Apply to be an Intervene Peer Educator!

Applications for the Intervene Peer Educator position will open on Monday, January 14, 2019 and will close on Friday, February 15, 2019. Offers for interviews will be made on February 19. Interview day will be Saturday, February 23. Position offers will be made on February 23; we would ask that final acceptance or decline decisions be returned by Friday, March 1, 2019.

In order to qualify to be an Intervene Peer Educator, you must attend training in the Spring 2019 Quarter. The Intervene Peer Educator team will meet on Fridays from 11 am - 1 pm all 10 weeks of Spring Quarter. This training will cover skills and content necessary to the Intervene Peer Educator role. Additionally, a booster training will be held prior to Discoveries Orientation in Fall, with a date to be determined.

View the full position description here.

Ready to apply? Click here to apply to the Intervene Peer Educator Position!

Thrive Peer Health Educators

Do you care about college health issues such as mental health, sexual health, and alcohol and other drug topics? Do you have a passion for educating your peers about these topics? Then apply to become a Thrive Peer Health Educator!

Applications for the Thrive Peer Health Educator position will open on Monday, January 14, 2019 and will close on Friday, February 15, 2019 at 5:00 pm. Interview day will be Friday, February 22 on a sign-up basis upon invitation. Position offers will be made on February 24; we would ask that final acceptance or decline decisions be returned by Friday, March 1, 2019.

In order to qualify to be a Thrive Peer Health Educator, you must attend training in the Spring Quarter. The Thrive Peer Health Educator team will meet on Fridays from 10 am - 12 pm for 8 weeks of Spring Quarter. Training will cover designated focus area content and professional development related to the position.

View the full position description here.

Ready to apply? Click here to apply to the Thrive Peer Health Educator Position!

FAQ's

The Intervene and Thrive teams sound pretty similar. What's the difference?
The Intervene Peer Educators focus on gender-based violence prevention and education, as well as survivor support initiatives. The Intervene team also supports the 2017 Undergraduate Student Government initiative requiring all new and first year students to complete active bystander training and all returning students to complete an annual booster training.

The Thrive Peer Health Educators provide the DU community with workshops and outreach education on mental health, sexual health, alcohol and other drug topics. The Thrive Peer Health Educator program is relatively new and covers more health topic areas in comparison to the Intervene Peer Educators who explore their topic more in depth.

Can I be an Intervene Peer Educator and a Thrive Peer Health Educator at the same time?
We ask that students commit to one team for a full year. You are welcome to apply to be a part of one team one year, and apply to the other the next year, however we are not able to extend offers to a student to be on both teams at the same time.

I am not able to attend the required Spring training for the peer education program; should I still apply?
The Spring training is required for all new Peer Educators. It will be a time to learn content and build relationships with the rest of your team. If you are unable to attend the Spring training, you will not be eligible to be hired. We invite you to reapply next year!

I will be studying abroad next Fall; can I still apply?
If you are applying as a new Peer Educator for the 2019-2020 year, unfortunately we cannot consider you for the position since we require a 1 year service commitment. We invite you to reapply next year!

I am not available on the interview day; can I still apply?
We can be flexible on the interview date and time. Please contact Andy Thyrring ([email protected]) for Intervene Peer Educator interviews and Eva Esakoff ([email protected]) for Thrive Peer Health Educator interviews to set up an alternate time within a week of the original interview date. Please notify us promptly about your interest in setting up an alternative interview time.

What is the time commitment and/or compensation for being a Peer Educator?
Each Peer Educator can expect to work approximately 30-40 hours per quarter, with the expectation of working some evening and weekend events. Peer educators will be compensated at $11.10/hour for work related to the position through 2019. In 2020, compensation will increase to $12.00 to reflect state minimum wage requirements