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Josef Korbel School of International Studies

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Check here for current and archived press releases from the Josef Korbel School. 

2019
June 2019
UNICEF Executive Director Henrietta Fore cited a report by the Pardee Center in her address on May 15, 2019, to the UN Security Council. The report, Assessing the Impact of War on Development in Yemen, was commissioned by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and authored by Jonathan D. Moyer, David K. Bohl, Taylor Hanna, Brendan R. Mapes, and Mickey Rafa. Fore made a plea to bring an end to the conflict in Yemen: "Fifteen million children in Yemen are asking you to save their lives. Please help them. They need peace."

On June 22, 2019, Marie Berry and co-author Trishna Rana published research in Peace and Change, “What Prevents Peace? Women and Peacebuilding in Bosnia and Nepal.” Through interviews with more than 70 women, they “identify five barriers that prevent women from feeling at peace in their daily lives: economic insecurity, competing truths, hierarchies of victimhood, continuums of violence, and spatial and temporal dislocation.”

Cullen Hendrix published “What Food Price-Related Protests in Sudan and Liberia Tell Us About How Autocracies and Democracies Address Price Crises” in Political Violence at a Glance on June 25, 2019. In it, he notes that by “confronting high prices, the Weah administration may face a tradeoff between policies that will curb protests and policies that will address the needs of the most food-insecure.”

On June 28, 2019, Julia Macdonald and colleague Mark Bell published an article in The Washington Quarterly, “How Dangerous Was Kargil? Nuclear Crises in Comparative Perspective.” The article identifies the Kargil War “as one of the few occasions that the world has come close to nuclear war, and perhaps second only to the Cuban Missile Crisis in terms of the risk of nuclear escalation.”

David W. Barillas Chón article “Indigenous Immigrant Youth’s Understandings of Power: Race, Labor, and Language” was published in the Association of Mexican American Educators Journal. His study investigated how Maya and other Indigenous recent immigrant youth from Guatemala and Mexico, respectively, understand indigeneity.

PBS NewsHour quoted Floyd Ciruli on June 7, 2019 in its analysis of a new poll that shows Democrats split between wanting a presidential nominee that shares their values and one that can beat Donald Trump.

Cullen Hendrix and co-authors published “Climate as a risk factor for armed conflict” in Nature. The piece is the result of an expert elicitation project coordinated by Katharine Mach of Stanford University’s Woods Institute for the Environment. A Nature editorial on the process was published as well, and the piece has generated media attention from outlets across the United States, Europe, Asia, and Australia. For a brief video synopsis of the process and findings, click here.

Cullen Hendrix and former Sié Fellow Jon Vreede (Korbel ’18) published "US Dominance in International Relations and Security Scholarship in Leading Journals” in Journal of Global Security Studies. The article is part of a special issue, coordinated by Jeff Colgan of Brown University, on US dominance in international relations scholarship.

Lynn Holland published “The DEA in Honduras: Targeting Corruption in High Places” in the Carnegie Ethics Online Monthly Column on June 12, 2019. The column highlight that while democratic activists are stuck in prison, the DEA investigates the president, his brother, and other high level officials for their connections to drug trafficking.

Rebecca Galemba published an op-ed in the Colorado Sun on June 16, 2019, “When ICE fails to distinguish between the accused and the guilty, justice for all is hampered.” In it, she notes that “creating clear lines of authority and jurisdiction between local criminal justice systems and ICE can create more consistency and improve the execution of, and access to, justice for victims, witnesses and defendants alike.” She also has a piece in the Washington Post’s blog The Monkey Cage on June 19, 2019, explaining the realities of the Mexico-Guatemala border, as well as how militarization has contributed to human rights abuses against migrants and overall insecurity in the borderlands for migrants and local inhabitants.

On June 17, 2019, Cullen Hendrix was quoted in Colorado Daily, saying, “We know that armed conflicts can hurt human development. And down the road, severe climate change can worsen armed conflicts.” He also wrote “Responsible Policy Engagement: Some Challenges” in Political Violence at a Glance on June 19, 2019, where he spoke about some challenges in engaging with policy debates.

On June 18, 2019, “For Iran, Options Are Few and Prospects Are Grim” by Gary Grappo was published in the Fair Observer. He writes that “Iran can’t be the only one to suffer the consequences of Washington’s sanctions.”

Nader Hashemi was interviewed on CGTN’s The Heat on June 18, 2019, on the death of former Egyptian President Mohamed Morsi.

David Goldfischer wrote “Gardner has put pressure on Russia; now he must hold the president accountable” in the Denver Post June 21, 2019, where he states that “Sen. Gardner is in a position to change the national conversation in favor of the truth,” and calls upon the senator to act.

On June 21, 2019, Tricia Olsen and Laura Bernal-Bermúdez’s article in Political Violence at a Glance was featured in the Center for Security Studies’ blog, “When Norms Collide: Business, Human Rights, and Economic Development in Colombia.

Haider Kahn published “The Continuing US Strategy for Regime Change in Venezuela: A Tragedy is Unfolding” in the Inter Press Service on May 22, 2019, writing, “One thing is clear. Venezuela is dangerously close to a civil war with the real possibility of direct US intervention upping the ante.”

On May 22, 2019, Chen Reis and Marie Barry published, “How do you reduce sexual and gender violence in conflict?” in the Washington Post’s Monkey Cage blog, noting five key issues to keep in mind, especially as the Ending Sexual and Gender-based Violence in Humanitarian Crises conference was underway.

Marie Barry’s book War, Women, and Power: From Violence to Mobilization in Rwanda and Bosnia-Herzegovina was reviewed in the journal Mobilization . The review described Women, War, and Power as “a thoughtful book replete with intimate details about women’s personal suffering and political reconstruction in the aftermath of violence.”

On May 28, 2019, Tricia Olsen and Laura Bernal-Bermudez published “When Norms Collide: Business, Human Rights, and Economic Development in Colombia” in Political Violence at a Glance, remarking, “Colombia faces the challenge of reconciling two competing norms—an accountability norm (specifically, for economic actors) and an economic development norm, so as to ensure the peace experiment sticks.”

Oliver Kaplan’s research was cited in “What Colombia Can Teach Us About Afghanistan” on May 28, 2019, in The Diplomat. The article pointed out that “Like the Afghan Taliban, guerrilla fighters in Colombia have little education, weak family ties, and showcase antisocial personality traits, all predictors of recidivism...Roughly 5 to 10 percent of ex-FARC have rejoined the fight, many of them mid-ranking cadres.”

On May 29, 2019, Rebecca Galemba’s research into wage theft among Colorado day laborers was featured in DU’s newsroom, which noted, “Galemba’s work — which aims to bring more than just data to the table — blends research, policy advocacy, legal assistance and direct action, often in conjunction with El Centro’s Direct Action Team.”

May 2019
On May 8, 2019, Haider Khan published “From Sanctioning Iran to War?” and on May 17, 2019, he also published “The US Strategy for Regime Change in Iran: A Dangerous Game”, both in the Inter Press Service.

David Goldfischer published an op-ed on May 12, 2019 on the historynewsnetwork.org on “George Orwell and Why the Time to Stop Trump is Now”.

On May 21, 2019, Nader Hashemi visited 9NEWS (KUSA) to discuss the potential for war with Iran after weeks of rising tensions. He also joined CTV News to discuss escalating tensions between the United States and Iran.

Haider Kahn published “Trump and China: The Art of Deal or Clumsy Bullying?” in the Inter Press Service on May 13, 2019, hypothesizing that “China will keep the doors open for negotiation, but will never submit to bullies like Trump.”

Oliver Kaplan was interviewed about his book, Resisting War, on the Colombia Calling podcast (Apple, Soundcloud) on May 14, 2019. His book was also reviewed in the journal Mobilization (scroll to read the review).

On May 14, 2019, Pardee Center Director Jonathan Moyer was interviewed about the recent UNDP report by Ryan Warner on CPR's Colorado Matters program. Warner spoke with Professor Moyer about how to understand the impacts of the war in Yemen, as well as how Pardee Center researchers approached the question of measuring effects on human development.

Postdoctoral Fellow Juliana Restrepo Sanín wrote about “What to do When Women Politicians are Attacked?” in Political Violence at a Glance on May 14, 2019.

Sam Zhao’s interview on the clash of civilizations and the US-China relations was published as a lead article in the leading Chinese economic and financial news blog, zhonghongwang.com (article in Chinese) on May 15, 2019. In response to the recent racist statement by the US State Department Policy Planning Director that the U.S. is planning for a ‘clash of civilizations against China because China isn’t ‘Caucasian’’ while The Cold War with the Soviet Union was “a fight within the Western family,” Professor Zhao told the Chinese audience that this statement is not true and does not represent the thinking of the majority of American scholars and policy analysts. The current rivalry between the US and China are caused by the conflicts of geopolitical and economic interests rather than different civilizations.

The Pardee Center's recent report for the UNDP continues to inform discourse about the effects of the conflict in Yemen. A May 17 article in The Nation and a May 20 editorial by Nicholas Kristof for The New York Times both cite the report.

Katherine Tennis published an article with Rachel Robinson at American University in Population Studies and Policy Review titled "Where do Population Policies Come From? Copying in African Fertility and Refugee Policies." The authors used plagiarism detection software to trace policy diffusion and determine when countries copy policy text from one another or from international sources. Among other things, we find that refugee policies contained more copied text than fertility policies, that poorer countries borrowed more policy text than richer countries, and that other countries’ policies are preferred to international templates. This finding was interpreted as being the effect of the differing strength of international regimes around international refugee and population law, and the different capacities of countries to produce policy.

Sam Zhao was quoted in an April 27 Bloomberg News story about Xi Jinping's second Belt and Road forum, saying, “The attendance of some EU countries leaders show the projects are attractive to some developed countries which also have their own domestic economic issues. Since the trade war with the U.S. broke out, China has reexamined its leverage in its relations with major countries and readjusted some accordingly.”

On April 30, Haider Khan had an op-ed published in the Inter Press Service, asking: “Sanctioning Iran: Will it work?” In it, he writes, “What will be the geoeconomic and geopolitical impact [of sanctions]? Is there a way to find out through some kind of rigorous model-based analysis? Indeed there may be a sober reality-based way of looking at the possible economic consequences and draw out the plausible geopolitical scenarios.”

The Pardee Center's report for the UNDP, "Assessing the Impact of War on Development in Yemen", was featured as Foreign Policy 's Document of the Week on May 3. The report was researched and authored by five Korbel School alumni and Pardee Center staff: Jonathan D. Moyer, David K. Bohl, Taylor Hanna, Brendan R. Mapes, and Mickey Rafa. On May 1, Senator Bernie Sanders posted a video of his staff distributing the report to colleagues and on May 2, he cited the report on the Senate floor in advance of a vote on the War Powers Resolution. This article from Vox on May 8 describes the importance of the crisis in Yemen to Sanders' foreign policy message.

On May 7, Rachel Epstein published a blog at Political Violence at a Glance, “Radicalization in the German Armed Forces and Beyond”, where she interviewed Professors Donald Abenheim and Carolyn Halladay of the Naval Postgraduate School.

CBC News quoted Sam Zhao in a May 9 story about U.S.-China trade talks. Zhao noted, "I don't think the tariffs themselves are the solution to the imbalance. That’s why we're seeing the negotiations. There are many other factors that produced the imbalance. If the trade war continues, it will have a negative impact on global GDP growth and disrupt complex global supply chains crucial to American firms' success.”

Gary Grappo published “The End of the Iran Nuclear Deal” in Fair Observer on May 10. He writes, “Throwing the future of the deal at the feet of the Europeans illustrates the desperation of Iran’s leadership and its economy.”

A new issue of the Journal of Contemporary China is now available, with a focus on the end of China’s one-child policy.

Timothy Sisk published “Elections South Africa 2019: 25 Years “Post-Apartheid,” la luta continua…” on the Political Violence @ a Glance/Denver Dialogues blog, with five reflections on “post-apartheid” South Africa and its fifth general election since its early 1990s transition to democracy.

Kai Thaler published “Authoritarian Resilience: Why Bouteflika and Bashir Fell, but Ortega Remains” in Political Violence @ a Glance/Denver Diolgues blog, discussing aspects of “people power” movements.

Sam Zhao published commentary on “If the U.S. and China Make a Trade Deal, Then What?” in Asian Society’s online magazine, ChinaFile.
April 2019
Rebecca Galemba had an op-ed published in the Colorado Sun about new state legislation on wage theft. In it, she supports the criminalization of wage theft while also demonstrating gaps in this approach and ways forward.

Oliver Kaplan’s book was reviewed in the Peacebuilding Journal. The review notes that Kaplan’s book, Resisting War, “flips the traditional analysis of peacemaking on its head by examining how local communities actively engage in reducing violence during times of civil conflict.”

Pardee Center Research Associate Austin S. Matthews published an analysis article in the Washington Post's blog, The Monkey Cage, titled "What happens to Kazakhstan's dictatorship now that its dictator has quit?" The article applies academic literature on leadership transitions within authoritarian regimes to the ongoing situation in Kazakhstan, following the resignation of 30-year dictator Nursultan Nazarbayev. The article argues that the regime will likely survive this transition because of formal institutions put in place by the previous leader.

The war in Yemen is the "greatest preventable disaster facing humanity" according to a report by Pardee Center researchers Jonathan D. Moyer, David K. Bohl, Taylor Hanna, Brendan R. Mapes and Mickey Rafa. The report, Assessing the Impact of War on Development in Yemen , was commissioned by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and was launched April 23 in Amman, Jordan. Researchers used the International Futures model to explore impacts of the war in Yemen since the 2015 escalation, including serious setbacks to human development and an alarming death rate in children under five. On April 24, Al Jazeera's Inside Story broadcast "What Can Be Done to Resolve the Conflict in Yemen?" using the report and its findings to inform an in-depth conversation about the crisis and the future of Yemen. Luke Vargas likewise cites the Pardee Center report in his article "The War in Yemen Has Sent the Country Back to the 1990's" in Talk Media News, also published April 24.

Sam Zhao was quoted in a Bloomberg News story, “China's Belt and Road Cracks Down on Corruption in Image Revamp.” He noted, "Since the trade war erupted, China faced domestic and international resistance and encountered setbacks in several countries which made the party rethink the publicity, especially on an international image. But I don’t think changes in the tone will make a difference. China’s international image has changed fundamentally from a moderate China to an assertive China."

Gary Grappo
recently reviewed William Burns’s book, The Back Channel: A Memoir of American Diplomacy and The Case for Its Renewal , for the Cipher Brief. “Writing a memoir is something of a rite of passage for retiring senior government officials and diplomats. The better ones make a big splash shortly following their release and then slowly fade to the shelves of the local or university library. The Back Channel: A Memoir of American Diplomacy and The Case for Its Renewal will be different. Much different.”

Brian O’Neill published a review article in the journal WIREs Climate Change on “The use of the Community Earth System Model in human dimensions climate research and applications.” It examines trends in societally relevant research that uses one of the world’s leading earth system models, concluding that research that applies the model to human dimensions of the climate change issue is growing twice as fast as research limited to the physical sciences alone.

Pardee Center Research Associate Collin Meisel and Director Jonathan D. Moyer published a blog post, “Preparing for China’s Rapid Rise and Decline,” in War on the Rocks. The piece notes that while China’s rise is, at this point, glaringly apparent, forecasts using the Pardee Center's International Futures tool suggest that the same is true of China’s subsequent decline. The authors argue that preparation for this reality must begin now so tomorrow’s strategists may reap the benefits that strategists managing China’s rise lack today.

Korbel alum Kaelyn DeVries (MA International Security '18) published a piece in Border Criminologies, "Transnational Policing, Migration Control, and the Gendered Persecution of Central America's Youth.” In the blog, she draws on her experience in Central America, as well as research she conducted with Rebecca Galemba as an RA in the Summer of 2017 at the Mexico-Guatemala border.

Oliver Kaplan’s book, Resisting War: How Communities Protect Themselves, was recently reviewed in the journal Peacebuilding.

The student group Colectivo published its Spring 2019 Research Digest on border externalization. “Border externalization is becoming an increasingly relevant topic as physical borders and the laws governing them have become obfuscated by social and political agendas. In many cases, these laws are trojan horse policies that champion homeland security on the outside while contributing to human rights violations on the inside. Current events have been populated by the echoing cries of victims of border externalization. Some of the more prominent examples include Europe’s response to the The Syrian Refugee Crisis, as well as President Trump’s controversial immigration policies and immigration deterrents such as the Zero-Tolerance Policy and the proposed border wall. It is important that we as students are informed on these issues and understand how they arise, are perpetuated, and what can be done to mitigate their effects.”

Marie Berry was quoted in The Wire, "25 Years After the Genocide – Quota, Power and Women in Rwanda." “‘The high level of women in parliament obscures the fact that the parliament has very little power in terms of the executive branch in Rwanda,’ says Marie E. Berry, leading political sociologist and Assistant Professor at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. Berry argues that the ability of Rwandan legislators, male or female, to shape and design policy is limited by whether or not the executive branch approves of the policy.” She was also quoted in a Psychology Today piece titled, “Year of the Woman? Not So Fast.” “Both here and abroad, the international anti-poverty group Oxfam has documented ‘a broad, disturbing trend.’ Dr. Marie Berry, assistant professor at the Joseph Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, notes in an Oxfam report, ‘The Trump administration is writing women and LGBTI rights and issues out of US policy documents, undermining decades of US leadership on these issues and threatening to imperil women and LGBTI communities across the world.’”

Pardee Center Research Associate Collin Meisel and Director Jonathan D. Moyer published a blog post, “On Hype and Hyperwar,” on the US Army’s Mad Scientist Laboratory. The article takes a realistic view of consequential trends likely to transform the Future Operational Environment in the coming decades, such as persistent demographic and economic shifts among great powers and the developing world. Ultimately, the authors encourage readers to eschew science fiction-inspired futurism in favor of empirically-grounded futures studies, striving toward the Pardee Center's vision of a more discernible future.

Sam Zhao’s article, “A New Cold War? Causes and Future of the Emerging US-China Rivalry” was just published as a lead article in RUDN International Relations, vol. 19, no. 1, 2019. “The Trump Administration declared China a strategic competitor and a revisionist power. It escalated a trade war to a full frontal clash with China. Some experts qualified it as a new Cold War between the US and China.”

Oliver Kaplan published a piece in Denver Dialogue’s Political Violence at a Glance, “Rwanda’s Protection Lessons for Peacekeeping.” “The 25th anniversary of the start of the Rwandan genocide this week has generated reflection on various aspects of the tragedy. One of these is peacekeeping. The international community and the UN failed to send adequate forces with robust operational mandates to stem the killing. While we continue to mourn the victims today, the events also hold important lessons for improving civilian protection.”

Marie Berry was interviewed by VOA for “One Outcome of Rwanda Genocide 25 Years Ago: More Women in Parliament.” “The genocide in Rwanda 25 years ago left an estimated 800,000 people, mostly Tutsis, dead. Since then, Rwanda has made progress in recovering from the devastation, growing its economy with GDP growth of six to eight percent a year since 2003, according to the World Bank. Also, Rwanda now has the highest percentage of female parliamentarians in the world - more than 60 percent.”

Floyd Ciruli was the lead source for an article in the Economist on Governor Polis, “Jared Polis, Colorado’s governor, is an unusual breed: a libertarian democrat.” “Last autumn’s election was the most significant for Colorado’s political realignment in more than 40 years, says Floyd Ciruli of Ciruli Associates, a political consulting firm.”

Professor Barry Hughes' new book has been published and is now available. International Futures: Building and Using Global Models extensively covers one of the most advanced systems for integrated, long-term, global and large-scale forecasting analysis available today, the International Futures (IFs) system. Key elements of a strong, long-term global forecasting system are described, i.e. the formulations for the driving variables in separate major models and the manner in which these separate models are integrated. The heavy use of algorithmic and rule-based elements and the use of elements of control theory is also explained.

Sam Zhao was interviewed on US-China Trade war and China Foreign Investment Law by CGTN. “There are still a lot of problems they have to deal with such as the forced technology transfer and the subsidies to the state-owned enterprises…”

Haider Khan published an OpEd in Daily Finland, “Will the genocide against Rohingyas continue?” A great human tragedy like the one involving Bangladesh, India and Pakistan in 1971 has been continuing for many years, gaining in intensity and ferocity. When will the civilized nations of our international society respond in favor of protecting all that stands for decent respect for humanity?

Juliana Restrepo Sanin published two articles in a special edition of the Journal of Women, Politics and Policy, "I Don't Belong Here": Understanding Hostile Spaces" and “#MeToo What Kind of Politics? Panel Notes.

Sarah Glaser and Cullen Hendrix were published in New Security Beat, “From Joseph Kony to Nile Perch: Complex Links Hook Armed Conflict to Fisheries.” “In “Africa’s smallest war,” both Kenya and Uganda lay claim to Migingo Island, a tiny island in the waters of Lake Victoria. While the claims are over the island, the conflict is about something else entirely: Lates niloticus, also known as Nile perch, a tasty white fish that swims in the waters surrounding the island. The fish forms the backbone of the Lake Victoria economy but is increasingly hard to come by along the lakeshore. Catches are in decline, incomes are dropping, and the Ugandan government is taking increasingly harsh, militarized steps to help revive the fishery. Who is to blame?”

Gary Grappo was featured in the Jackson Hole News & Guide in the story, “Explore diplomacy in ‘Oslo’ discussion.” “Off Square will put the art of diplomacy on center stage in the Center Theater with a reading of “Oslo,” a Tony Award-winning play that tells the story of Norway’s role in the Oslo Accords, a series of agreements signed between the Israeli and Palestinian governments in the 1990s. Karin Waidley will direct the staged reading, starring actors Jihad Milhem, Ami Dayan and Fajer Kaisi. The reading, which begins at 1 p.m., will be followed by “The Art of Diplomancy,” a 4:30 panel discussion on with Ambassador Gary Grappo.”

GFTEI student Natalie McMillan has published her first article, “In the DR Congo, A Failure to Protect is a Failure to Contain,” in the Georgetown Journal of International Affairs. “On February 24 and 27, 2019, unidentified attackers set fire to two Ebola treatment centers operated by Médecines Sans Frontiers (MSF) in the cities of Katwa and Butembo in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), forcing evacuations, killing a nurse, and damaging both facilities. Unfortunately, these brutal attacks on health workers are not likely to be the last – or the most severe. In fact, violence against health-care workers is on the rise.”

Carly Kuhtz and Liza Henriquez, International Studies students who traveled to Chiapas last December, report via podcast on how communities there are fighting for a cleaner environment and enough land to farm on.
March 2019
Deborah Avant appeared in the Stars and Stripes podcast Force for Hire, “Episode 3: The beginnings of Blackwater and how it forever changed US policy.

Yolande Bouka (Postdoctoral Fellow ’18), Marie Berry, and Marilyn Muthoni Kamuru published an article in Journal of East African Studies, “Women’s political inclusion in Kenya’s devolved political system.” “Kenya’s 2010 constitutional reforms devolved the political system and included a quota designed to secure a minimum threshold of women in government. While the 2017 elections yielded the country’s highest proportion of women in government in history via both elected and appointed positions, many political entities still fell short of the new gender rule, leaving them in noncompliance with the constitution. The 2017 elections reveal a tension: while devolution raised the stakes of local elections and the quota has improved women’s political inclusion, these reforms have not fundamentally changed the power of political parties, the way campaigns are financed, cultural ideas about women’s leadership, and the pervasiveness of violence in Kenyan elections.”

Cullen Hendrix published an article in Political Violence at a Glance, “Why Bread and Oil Protests in Sudan Promoted a Cabinet Reshuffle.” “Last week, in response to mass street protests, Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir announced a new cabinet at the same time Sudanese authorities freed a noted opposition leader, Mariam al-Mahdi, who had taken part in mass protests against a state of emergency called on February 22nd. Human Rights Watch has put the death toll associated with these protests—including children and medical staff—at 51. And that figure is now over a month old. Sudan is now on its third cabinet in two years, with previous governments unable to tackle the country’s economic challenges. So, what’s this got to do with the price of bread?”

Deborah Avant published a piece in Al Jazeera, “On how Mehdi Hasan caught Erik Prince in a lie.” “On March 15, Mehdi Hasan interviewed Erik Prince on the Al Jazeera show Head to Head. Much as the show's title suggests, Hasan is a hard-hitting questioner eager for that ‘got you’ moment. Hasan was well prepared with Prince's congressional testimony in hand and appears to have caught Prince in some double talk about an August 3, 2016 meeting at Trump Tower (with George Nader, Joel Zamel, Steven Miller, and Donald Trump Jr). In the interview, Prince, after he mistakenly asserted he had told Congress about the meeting, also disclosed what the meeting was about: Iran policy...Hasan's style of questioning was so focused on that ‘got you’ moment, though, that he left important questions about other issues unasked.”

The United Nations Environment Programme’s sixth Global Environmental Outlook (GEO) report was published in March 2018. The report demonstrates that urgent action is required to mitigate the externalized costs of human development and was compiled by 250 scientists and experts from 70 countries. Contributions by Pardee Center researchers included an assessment that we are “off track” to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, along with an analysis of synergies and trade-offs in achieving these global targets. Steve G. Hedden served as Coordinating Lead Author on Chapter 21, and Lead author on Chapters 22 and 24. Jonathan D. Moyer was Lead Author on Chapter 21 and Contributing Author on Chapter 22, while Barry Hughes was a Contributing Author on Chapters 21 and 22. The full report and the Summary for Policy Makers are available here: https://www.unenvironment.org/resources/global-environment-outlook-6 Interactive story here: https://www.unenvironment.org/interactive/global-environment-outlook/

Dan Baer published a piece in Foreign Affairs titled “The Mueller Report Is a Test for the United States.” “There’s no question that the primary audience for U.S. special counsel Robert Mueller’s much-anticipated report, which he delivered to the Justice Department on Friday, is a domestic one. But around the world, foreign ministries and intelligence services will be watching how the United States responds to the findings for clues about the country’s strength.” His opinion piece, “Education funding increase is a big step forward for Colorado students and families,” ran in the Colorado Sun.

Rebecca Galemba had an article published in NACLA: Report on the Americas in a special issue called Beyond Borders. The article "Coyotes from the Same Wolf," traces the continuities and disjunctures in border flows and closures at the Mexico-Guatemala border. It argues that recent narratives of "emergency" remove the history and context of migratory movements, justifying the escalation of the border militarization agenda to the detriment of local livelihoods and social relations that have long transcended this border region. The article will also appear in NACLA's print magazine.

Marie Berry and Laura Mann published a piece, “Rwanda’s economic growth has given its strong state even more power,” in The Nerve Africa and The Conversation. “Rwanda has emerged as a model for economic development. The country has taken great strides just 25 years since its horrific genocide. But at the same time the government under President Paul Kagame has been widely criticised for its authoritarian tactics and use of violence against those who oppose it.”

Deborah Avant’s piece “The Mueller Report and Global Contentious Politics” appeared in Political Violence at a Glance. “As we begin to digest Attorney General William Barr’s summary of the Mueller Report’s findings, one thing is crystal clear: allies of Putin, private companies, and other interested parties outside the United States sought, and had, influence over US elections. Henry Farrell and Abe Newman argue in Of Privacy and Power that we had better get used to this. US domestic politics is not its own separate sphere as academics often assume. Instead, it can be deeply affected by political strategies of non-citizens quite removed from US territory. Far beyond the transnational activists that Keck and Sikkink wrote about, there is growing evidence that many, many transnational links are impacting political struggles as political actors can (as Farrell and Newman say in a related article) “weaponize interdependence.”

Julia Macdonald and Mark Bell published work in Texas National Security Review titled, “How to Think About Nuclear Crises.” “How dangerous are nuclear crises? What dynamics underpin how they unfold? Recent tensions between North Korea and the United States have exposed disagreement among scholars and analysts regarding these questions. We reconcile these apparently contradictory views by showing the circumstances in which different models of nuclear crises should be expected to hold.”

The DU Just Wages Project, led by Professor Rebecca Galemba, recently released results from a two year qualitative and quantitative study on wage theft experienced by day laborers in the Denver metro area. From 2015-2017, she led teams of DU graduate and undergraduate students in collaboration with community partners (El Centro Humanitario, Sturm College of Law, and Towards Justice) to conduct qualitative interviews and participant observation with 170 workers. Research teams also conducted interviews with legal agency staff, lawyers, non-profits, employers, and policymakers in order to understand the larger context in which wage theft operates. The qualitative study followed with a survey of 400 day laborers coupled with Know Your Rights outreach at street corner hiring sites. Read the full report or a condensed version

Cullen Hendrix, Sarah Glaser (Korbel Research Scientist), Brittany Franck (’14), Karin Wedig (GIZ) and Les Kaufman (Boston University) published “Armed conflict and fisheries in the Lake Victoria basin” in Ecology and Society. The work was supported by the Minerva Initiative of the U.S. Department of Defense and the National Science Foundation Dynamics of Coupled Natural and Human Systems program. “Civil conflict is the most prevalent form of armed conflict in the world today, but this significant driver of food and income security has been largely missing from studies of fisheries.”

In an interview with Bloomberg News, Professor Sam Zhao discussed disillusioned Chinese bureaucrats since President Xi came to office and centralized power in his hands. Professor Zhao said, “The abolition of term limits, which Xi pushed for and won in last year’s National People’s Congress, and efforts to consolidate his personal authority run counter to the country’s meritocratic tradition. Since Deng Xiaoping, the Communist Party of China tried to institutionalize a system that grooms and assigns young and well-educated cadres to key positions. But that system is breaking down. Bureaucrats don’t dare to do things, as they worry about making mistakes”

Tricia Olsen published a post in this week’s Denver Dialogue for Political Violence at a Glance, “Temper the Treaty Fever: Why a Treaty Won’t Solve the Business and Human Rights Conundrum.” “Human rights advocates, observers, and policy leaders have made great strides toward creating a treaty for business and human rights. In October 2018, the UN’s intergovernmental working group shared an initial draft (the “Zero Draft”), which was discussed by over 400 civil society organizations, 94 state representatives, and business leaders in Geneva. Yet, an established body of literature documents the ineffectiveness of treaties, in particular around respect for human rights. They sound like a good idea, there’s plenty of enthusiasm at the outset, but they aren’t great at actually creating change. The lessons of past human rights treaties suggest that the current treaty fever in Geneva and elsewhere is misguided.”

Cullen Hendrix and Idean Salehyan published a new article in the Journal of Peace Research, “Ethnicity, nonviolent protest, and lethal repression in Africa.” “Using the Social Conflict Analysis Database, we demonstrate that as the size – and to a lesser extent homogeneity – of the ethnic ruling coalition grows, governments are significantly less likely to use deadly force against nonviolent protesters.”

Timothy Sisk was mentioned in the International Centre for Defence and Security’s blog, “The Growing Signs of the Fragility and Resilience of Liberal Democracy.” “In the 2017 IDEA report, Timothy Sisk describes the resilience of democracy as ‘the properties of a political system to cope, survive and recover from complex challenges and crises that represent stresses or pressures that can lead to a systemic failure.’”

The Pardee Center’s Diplometrics project was cited in the Economist’s March 7, 2019, cover story titled, “The New Scramble for Africa: And How Africans Could Win.” “Its majestic herds of diplomats: According to the Diplometrics project at the University of Denver more than 320 embassies or consulates were opened in Africa between 2010 and 2016.”

Cullen Hendrix and Idean Salehyan published a new article in the Journal of Peace Research, “Ethnicity, nonviolent protest, and lethal repression in Africa.” “Why do governments use deadly force against unarmed protesters? The government’s threat perception may be a function of the mobilization potential of the opposition and/or the size of the ruling elite’s support coalition. Given the high salience of ethnicity in African politics, governments that depend on small ethnic coalitions will see peaceful protests as more threatening, as the opposition may be able to draw on larger numbers of potential dissidents and excluded groups. Alternately, governments with larger, more homogeneous ethnic coalitions will find nonviolent mobilization less threatening and will be less likely to respond with deadly force. Using the Social Conflict Analysis Database, we demonstrate that as the size – and to a lesser extent homogeneity – of the ethnic ruling coalition grows, governments are significantly less likely to use deadly force against nonviolent protesters.”

Marie Berry’s book, War, Women, and Power, was mentioned in the International Affairs blog, “Top 12 Books: International Women’s Day.” “As a country transitions from violent conflict to ‘peace,’ men and women often have different visions for the postwar future. Marie E. Berry’s well-researched book is a comparative study not only of the ways in which women responded to the wars in Rwanda and Bosnia, but also of what happened to the women and their visions for the future after the war officially ended.”

Juliana Restrepo Sanin wrote a blog for Political Violence at a Glance, “Despite its Advances, the Colombian Peace Agreement Undermines Gender Equality Goals.” “In 2016 the government of Colombia signed a peace agreement with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC). The Peace Agreement represents an important threshold as it puts an end to more than 50 years of struggle between the Colombian state and the FARC. At the same time, this document is the most gender-sensitive peace agreement to date. This achievement was possible, in part, because of the work of feminist activists and women’s organizations that pressured both the government and the FARC to include women.”

In an interview by Bloomberg news, Professor Suisheng Zhao discussed disillusioned Chinese bureaucrats since President Xi came to office and centralized power in his hands. Professor Zhao said that “The abolition of term limits, which Xi pushed for and won in last year’s National People’s Congress, and efforts to consolidate his personal authority run counter to the country’s meritocratic tradition. Since Deng Xiaoping, the Communist Party of China tried to institutionalize a system that grooms and assigns young and well-educated cadres to key positions. But that system is breaking down. Bureaucrats don’t dare to do things, as they worry about making mistakes” Read more here.

Volume 28, Issue 116, March 2019 issue of the Journal of Contemporary China (JCC) is now available online. You can view full text of the article and others online, as well as an index of the previously published JCC articles by subject matter. The Journal is overseen by the Center for China-US Cooperation.

Postdoctoral fellow Kai Thaler wrote a blog post in the Duck of Minerva, “Flying Blind in Crisis Time: The US Strategic and Human Foreign Policy Deficit.” “This week has seen a number of key events and crises in global politics that have made crystal clear once again the careening mess that is US foreign policy under the current administration. The Trump administration has no real overarching strategy—the argument that allies in Europe and elsewhere should bear more of the costs of their defense was not articulated as part of any coherent broader vision—and gutting of the diplomatic corps has left the US devoid of expertise and key actors to confront crises when they arise.”

Sié Center Faculty Timothy Sisk was mentioned in the World Economic Forum in the story, "Religious violence is on the rise. What can faith-based communities do about it?” “Religious violence is undergoing a revival. The past decade has witnessed a sharp increase in violent sectarian or religious tensions. These range from Islamic extremists waging global jihad and power struggles between Sunni and Shia Muslims in the Middle East to the persecution of Rohingya in Myanmar and outbreaks of violence between Christians and Muslims across Africa.”

Sié Faculty Julia Macdonald published a chapter in the new book, Proxy Wars: Suppressing Violence through Local Agents edited by Eli Berman and David Lake.

Tricia Olsen, alongside Geoff Dancy, Bridget Marchesi, Leigh Payne, Andrew Reiter, and Kathryn Sikkink, published research in International Studies Quarterly, “Behind Bars and Bargains: New Findings in Transitional Justice in Emerging Democracies." This article presents data and findings from the group’s Transitional Justice Research Collaborative.
February 2019
Korbel School alumni Javad Zarif resigned from his position as Iranian Foreign Minister. Read more here.

Floyd Ciruli published a commentary in Colorado Politics, the state’s largest political website on the major trends in Colorado, including pro-marijuana commercialization, anti-hydrocarbons, and anti-growth, which now have champions among powerful political officeholders. “The political earthquake that rearranged the political plates in November is just beginning to have impact on Colorado’s policy and politics. The shake up brought new leaders, new constituencies and new social movements to power. Political changes are accelerating in Colorado, and the policy shifts now visible reflect powerful, longer-term trends that portend disruption of the status quo.”

Rebecca Galemba’s book Contraband Corridor was reviewed by border scholar, Howard Campbell for Rutgers Network Criminal Law and Criminal Justice Books. "Contraband Corridor is an extremely well-written, carefully observed ethnography that provides a real feel for the life of a border region that President Trump has unfairly characterized as anarchic and scary. Her discussion of the ad hoc methods of border control developed by non-state actors, as well as the different strata of local smugglers, is fascinating. Galemba’s discussion of the evolution, history and construction of the Mexico-Guatemala border region is also revealing. Her emic perspective provides an often neglected window into the ideas and understanding of actual, rather than stereotypical, border smugglers. Such nuanced views are badly needed in this era of Trumpian nativism, xenophobia, racism and anti-immigrant hysteria. Moreover, the strategic importance of Mexico’s southern border to Mexican, Central American, and U.S. domestic and foreign policy will surely grow in the future. Galemba’s ethnography will become a key source for understanding the dilemmas this region faces, as well as how it impacts nearby nations."

Gary Grappo published “Setting U.S. Relations with Saudi Arabia on a Correction Course” in the Cipher Brief. “There was never any question that America’s relationship with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia would become one of its most important in the region and indeed in the world.”

Sié Faculty Cullen Hendrix, Erica Chenoweth, Drew Bowlsby, and Jonathan Moyer published a working paper in the British Journal of Political Science, “The Future is a Moving Target: Predicting Political Instability.” “Previous research by Goldstone et al. (2010) generated a highly accurate predictive model of state-level political instability. Notably, this model identifies political institutions – and partial democracy with factionalism, specifically – as the most compelling factors explaining when and where instability events are likely to occur. This article reassesses the model’s explanatory power and makes three related points: (1) the model’s predictive power varies substantially over time; (2) its predictive power peaked in the period used for out-of-sample validation (1995–2004) in the original study and (3) the model performs relatively poorly in the more recent period.”

Sié Faculty Deborah Avant and Korbel PhD graduate Kara Kingma Neu published an article in Political Violence at a Glance, “What We Can Learn from Looking at Private Security Across Time and Space.” “We know a lot about private security from analyses of its use in individual instances. Case studies of Sierra Leone, Angola, Croatia, Iraq, and Afghanistan have yielded important insights relevant to governments or others that might hire private military and security companies (PMSCs) and those who operate around them. In the last 10 years or so, scholars have begun to collect data to examine the industry and its potential impacts. Thus far, the data has focused on contracts with PMSCs – in either Africa or failing states. As we discuss in our recent article, the Private Security Events Database (PSED) allows a broader scope, covering events involving PMSCs in three regions (Africa, Latin America, and Southeast Asia) from 1990-2012.” You can now download the Private Security Events Database (PSED) researched and materialized by Sié Faculty Deborah Avant and Sié Research Fellow Kara Kingma Neu here.

Floyd Ciruli published a commentary in the Sunday Denver Post on the impact of growth and the Denver mayoral election. “The upcoming Denver mayoral election on May 7, 2019, has become dramatized by tensions caused by urban growth. If Mayor Michael Hancock’s challengers force a runoff (a dozen candidates have joined the race at last count), it will be largely because of the political disruption of Denver’s surging population boom.”

Katherine Tennis published an article in the Journal of Refugee Studies. The article, “Offshoring the Border: The 1981 United States–Haiti Agreement and the Origins of Extraterritorial Maritime Interdiction,” describes the historical roots of extraterritorial maritime interdiction as a way to prevent unwanted immigration. It draws on archival sources and contemporaneous legal opinions to show that even at the time of adoption, this agreement faced legal challenges and was viewed as a solution of last resort. Nevertheless, many of the legal challenges of modern extraterritorial interdiction trace back to the unique circumstances shaping this first agreement—including the need to cooperate with countries of embarkation, anticipatory determination of attempted entry and the offshoring of protection responsibilities.

Sam Zhao was quoted extensively in an interview published in The Diplomat. “‘Africa represents a crucial component of the Belt and Road Initiative,’ Dr. Suisheng Zhao, a professor of international studies at the University of Denver, told The Diplomat. ‘China’s goals in Africa primarily consist of acquiring natural resources, gaining access to regional markets, and outcompeting the United States and Japan on the continent, all of which have led China to South Sudan.’”

Professor and China Center Director Sam Zhao was interviewed and quoted in one story on China’s ventures in South Sudan, published in Diplomacy on February 11,2019. Zhao was quoted that “Africa represents a crucial component of the Belt and Road Initiative. China’s goals in Africa primarily consist of acquiring natural resources, gaining access to regional markets, and outcompeting the United States and Japan on the continent, all of which have led China to South Sudan.” Zhao observed that “China’s strategy in Africa has included a willingness to enter countries that Western companies consider too risky. That said, Western companies avoid South Sudan for good reason, and China is learning these lessons the hard way. China’s successes and failures in South Sudan are the result of this risk-taking.” Read more here.
January 2019
"Activism on sexuality and sexual politics in South & West Asia has been increasing in the last two decades resulting in challenges and opportunities to negotiate sexual subjectivity, intimacy and politics.” Korbel School Acting Dean Pardis Mahdavi looks at the personal politics of private life in the UAE in her article in Culture, Health and Sexuality Journal. Read more here.

CMES Director Nader Hashemi spoke with Kourosh Ziabari of the Fair Observer about contemporary relations between Iran and the Arab world, the role of authoritarian regimes in fueling sectarian rivalries, and what the future may hold. Read more here.

Josef Korbel School alumnus, David Pion-Berlin (PhD ’84, MA ’81) received the prestigious Alfred Stepan Lifetime Achievement Award in Defense, Public Security and Democracy by the Latin American Studies Association. Dr. Pion-Berlin is currently a Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Riverside. Learn more about his award here.

Sié Chéou-Kang Center Research Project on Ethical Approaches to Policy Engagement Awarded $500,000 From Carnegie Corporation of New York
Carnegie Corporation of New York has awarded a $500,000 grant to the Sié Chéou-Kang Center for a project titled "Rigor, Relevance, and Responsibility: Promoting Ethical Approaches to Policy Engagement.” The award enables the Sié Center, housed at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, to conduct a range of activities aimed at making ethical considerations an integral part of policy-relevant research and engagement in the field of international affairs, increasingly important research as scholars of international relations become more actively involved in policy debates and in the policy process.

Two other institutions—the Institute for the Theory & Practice of International Relations (ITPIR) at the College of William & Mary and the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs— will assist the team at the Sié Center explore the process of and attitudes about scholarly engagement with policy audiences and debates. In doing so, the program will alert academics and policymakers alike to the conditions under which academic engagement works best, while at the same time raising awareness of risks and how to mitigate them.

The Principal Investigators for this grant are Cullen Hendrix, Debbi Avant, Marie Berry, George DeMartino, Rachel Epstein, Jill Hereau, Oliver Kaplan, Julia Macdonald, Tricia Olsen, and Timothy Sisk. The project began January 1, 2019.
2018
December 2018
On December 16, Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir became the first Arab League leader to visit Damascus since the war in Syria began nearly eight years ago. CMES Director Nader Hashemi joined Al Jazeera to discuss current relations between Assad and other actors in the region, as well as the future of Syria. See the video online.
November 2018
Colorado Republicans Swept by Blue Tide
The Denver Post featured a guest commentary by Professor Floyd Ciruli as the lead in its Sunday Perspective section. It serves as a bookend to his column of September 14, titled: "Hold on: Political rumblings afoot. Colorado political could be shaken to its core this November".

The 2018 midterm election brought not just a wave but a widening gulf as Americans parted and divided into distinct camps. In Colorado voters rode that swell and moved the state deeper into the blue. While nationally the Democratic wave was not as big as some predicted, it was more than enough to capture control of the U.S. House and deliver the message President Donald Trump and his administration need restraint.
October 2018
DU Korbel Homeland Security Students visit FBI Denver Division Headquarters
On Friday, October 26, 2018, 16 Korbel students in the International Security Master’s Degree and Homeland Security Certificate Program who are enrolled in Dr. Ben Gochman’ s graduate course, Introduction to Homeland Security (INTS 4730), visited the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Division Field Office in Denver, Colorado.

In this post-9/11 world, FBI Denver continues to tackle a wide variety of national security threats and Federal crimes—from terrorism to cyber- attacks, from healthcare and investment fraud to illegal gambling enterprises, child pornography, and gang activity. With new tools and capabilities, FBI Denver is committed to continuing its work to defend the people and protect the nation.

Korbel Homeland Security student’s visit included a question and answer session with Assistant Special Agent-in-Charge (ASAC) Michael Nordall who spoke about the FBI’s role in Counterterrorism, Criminal Investigations, Counterintelligence, Cyber Crimes and FBI career opportunities.

Highlights of the tour included visiting the FBI armory and meeting with the FBI Bomb tech with his robot. A special thanks to Special Agent Charles LeFrace of the FBI Evidence Response Team (ERT) for organizing 4 stations to visit including Bullet Trajectory, HAZMAT Response Team, Explosive Device Evidence Collection, and Fingerprinting. This was one of the highlights of the tour!

Korbel Homeland Security Students visit FBI




Trump Will Push Trade Policies as Helping Workers in U.S. Heartland
WSJ reporter Vivian Salama spoke with Korbel School associate professor Cullen Hendrix about what Trump might hope to highlight about his trade policies on his trip to the US heartland. Hendrix discussed the mixed effects of tariffs on agricultural and industrial state economies, and how tariffs are keeping US producers from taking advantage of rebounding commodity prices. Read the digital version here.


Journalist Jamal Khashoggi and the Korbel School Center for Middle East Studies
In light of the tragic and senseless murder of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi, the Center for Middle East Studies (CMES) published for the first time an edited transcript of a speech he delivered on April 26, 2018, as the keynote speaker of the 19th Annual Conference of the Center for the Study of Islam and Democracy (CSID) in Washington, DC. CMES co-sponsored this event and awarded Jamal the Muslim Democrat of the Year Award. The New York Times also published excerpts from the speech as an op-ed on Monday.


Help us share the knowledge that will stem this rising tide of hate
CMES Director Nader Hashemi and colleagues Sarah Pessin and Andrea Stanton wrote an op-ed for the Denver Post addressing this weekend’s mass shooting of a Synagogue in Pittsburgh. In keeping with the University of Denver’s dedication to the public good, the authors offer educational experiences and materials that address issues of religious literacy and diversity. Read the digital version here.


Sins of Omission: Reporting on Women’s and LGBTI Rights Deteriorating Under Trump Administration
Women’s rights and the rights of lesbians, gays, bisexuals, trans, and intersex (LGBTI) persons are human rights, but they are getting short shrift in the US government’s most prominent assessments of human rights under the Trump administration. In February 2018, the media reported that State Department officials had been ordered to cut back on discussions of women’s rights and issues, such as reproductive rights and violence against women, as well as on discussions of sexual and gender-based discrimination in human rights assessments. An analysis of the data by Korbel faculty Marie Berry and Cullen Hendrix suggests that this order has been heeded. Read the digital version here.
August 2018
The 2017-18 Annual Review has been published. Global Connections, From Here to Everywhere: Korbel Making an Impact in Denver, Across the Nation and Around the World gives updates on the Korbel School’s strategic plan, mission vision values, center updates and student success. It also features special visitors and donors who have helped make the past year great. Read the digital version here.
July 2018
The Korbel School of International Studies is proud to announcement a new graduate Certificate in Global Environmental Change and Adaptation – or GECA.

The 21st century will present challenges in meeting our food, water, and energy needs – both here on the front range and across the globe. Given the magnitude of these tasks, we need innovative, sustainable approaches to meeting these needs through just and equitable development while addressing the security concerns these challenges pose. This certificate gives participants the opportunity to lead the charge in meeting these challenges within the government, nonprofit and private sectors. The GECA certificate combines a core curriculum with wide latitude to explore issues of sustainability and environmental management from a variety of perspectives – all while enjoying the natural beauty our home in Denver provides. Watch this video to learn more!
May 2018
Fiscal Year 2019 Korbel Tactical Plan

DENVER—May, 2018—During academic year 2017-2018, Korbel School faculty, staff, and students participated in an inclusive and detailed strategic planning process. An extensive amount of data collection, research, and analysis was done to ensure each initiative is thoughtful, inclusive, and targeted toward the driving outcome — to improve the student experience. The fiscal year 2019 Korbel tactical plan reflects the foundational directions and subsequent tactical initiatives that were seen as critical to immediate implementation as work continues on a more robust and transformative five-year Korbel strategic plan.

2017
October 2017

What #TakeAKnee Has to do With Higher Education

DENVER—October 12, 2017—This week, athletes have become the center of much political conversation as #TakeAKnee takes hold as a political movement. Started last year by NFL star Colin Kaepernick, the Twitter handle refers to athletes kneeling during the national anthem, which is played before many sporting events. But this growing protest movement has been misinterpreted as athletes taking a stand against the American flag and has become mired in conversations about free speech.

June 2017

Professor Pardis Mahdavi Named Senior Associate Dean at University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies

DENVER—June 27, 2017—The University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies is pleased to announce the appointment of Professor Pardis Mahdavi as Senior Associate Dean, effective August 1, 2017. In her new role, Professor Mahdavi will also serve as the school's chief academic officer.

Former Obama Refugee Chief Engages Korbel and DU on Trump Refugee Policy, Careers and More

DENVER—June 1, 2017—Last week, the Josef Korbel School was honored to host the Honorable Anne Richard, former Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of Population, Refugees, and Migration from 2012-2017 and a former vice president at the International Rescue Committee.

May 2017

Countering Violent Extremism Class Presents in DC, Receives National Recognition

DENVER—May 30, 2017—In January, Action Avenues, a student-made project created for Korbel Professor Annie Miller's "Civic Strategies to Prevent Violent Extremism" class, won honorable mention in the EdVenture's "Peer 2 Peer: Challenging Extremism" contest.

Kosovo Ambassador Vlora Çitaku Speaks on US Leadership in Western Balkans

DENVER—May 18, 2017—Yesterday the Josef Korbel School was honored to host Her Excellency Vlora Çitaku, the Ambassador of the Republic of Kosovo to the U.S., who discussed a range of topics with Dean Christopher R. Hill during an event sponsored by the school's Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy and Denver Women in International Security.

Ambassador Gary Grappo: Too Soon to Know if Democracy in Iraq Is Successful

DENVER—May 15, 2017—U.S. Ambassador Gary Grappo spoke on May 15, 2017, at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies about democratization efforts in Iraq now entering its fifteenth year. The event was organized by the Center for Middle East Studies.

April 2017

Finnish Ambassador Speaks to Global Systems and Responsibilities

DENVER—April 28, 2017—Her Excellency Kirsti Kauppi, Ambassador of Finland to the United States, spoke at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at an April 27 event sponsored by the Colorado European Union Center of Excellence (CEUCE).

General Casey Speaks with Sié Fellows about Nation's Greatest Security Concerns

DENVER—April 3, 2017—Korbel alumnus General George W. Casey Jr., (Ret.) (MA '80), former Chief of the Staff of the U.S. Army and Commander of the Multi-National Force in Iraq, recently took time to sit down to breakfast and talk with the Josef Korbel School's Sié Fellows and undergraduate students.

Korbel Student Meg Curran Qualifies for International Military Sports Council

DENVER—April 3, 2017—Meg Curran is fast—one of the fastest in the nation, actually. Between classes at the Josef Korbel School (as a first-year International Security student), work and life, last month Curran qualified for the International Military Sports Council Championship by placing in the top five of the 2016 Armed Forces Cross Country Championship.

'Age of Consequences' Explores Collaborative Solutions to Climate Change

DENVER—April 3, 2017—Climate change as an accelerant of instability was the leitmotif of a recent Josef Korbel School screening of "The Age of Consequences," a documentary tackling the confluence of climate change, globalization, and intra- and inter-state conflict.

March 2017

Josef Korbel School Announces Rice Family Endowed Professor of Practice

DENVER—Mar. 23, 2017—The Josef Korbel School of International Studies is pleased to announce the Rice Family Endowed Professor of Practice, a position made possible by a gift from alumna and former U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and other members of the DU community. Dr. Rice's fellow Korbel School alumnus, General George W. Casey Jr. (U.S. Army, Ret.), is the inaugural Rice Professor of Practice.

Korbel School Program Promoting Diversity and Inclusion Among International Affairs Professionals Celebrates 20 Years

DENVER—March 23, 2017—A Josef Korbel School program designed to bring greater quality and diversity to the staffing of senior management and policy-making positions in international affairs marks its twentieth anniversary this year.

Homeland Security Students Visit Colorado Air National Guard's 140th Operations Support Squadron at Buckley Air Force Base

DENVER—March 14, 2017—Twenty students in the Josef Korbel School's International Security master's degree and Homeland Security certificate program recently visited the 140th Operations Support Squadron as part of their graduate course, Homeland Security: Prevention and Mitigation.

Korbel School Welcomes Distinguished Alumna Dr. Condoleezza Rice

DENVER—March 10, 2017—The Josef Korbel School was honored to host the Honorable Condoleezza Rice (BA '74, PhD '81, HDR '96) for a visit on March 2, 2017. A standing room-only audience of nearly 400 Korbel School students, faculty, staff and friends of Korbel heard Dr. Rice's thoughts on a range of current foreign policy topics. 

February 2017

Is Hollywood Made in China?

DENVER—February 9, 2017—Dr. Aynne Kokas' presentation, based on her book, Hollywood Made in China: What are the Stakes?, was part of the Center for China-U.S. Collaboration's (CCUSC) Jackson/Ho Forum and focused on U.S.-Sino relations within the global film industry.

January 2017

Statement from Dean Christopher Hill Regarding Executive Order on Refugees and Immigrants

DENVER—January 31, 2017—Read Dean Christopher Hill's statement to the Korbel School community regarding President Trump's executive order of January 27, 2017, concerning refugees and immigrants. 

Renowned Latin America Scholar Peter H. Smith Joins Josef Korbel School

DENVER—January 30, 2017—The University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies is honored to announce the appointment of Professor Peter H. Smith as a visiting scholar and an affiliate with the school's Latin America Center. He is widely regarded as the premier expert on U.S.-Latin American relations.

China Center Hosts Forum on President Trump's Foreign Policy Challenges in East Asia

DENVER—Jan. 24, 2017—Just four days after U.S. President Donald Trump's inauguration, approximately 200 students, faculty, staff and Denver community members packed the Josef Korbel School of International Studies' Maglione Hall to attend the Center for China-US Cooperation's (CCUSC) event, "The Trump Administration's Foreign Policy Challenge: East Asia." The free, public event was part of the CCUSC's Jackson/Ho Forum series, which seeks to bring knowledgeable minds together to discuss issues around China-U.S. relations.

Carnegie Corporation Awards Josef Korbel School's Sié Center
$1 Million Grant on Bridging the Academic-Policy Gap

DENVER—Jan. 24, 2017—The University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy was awarded a $1 million, two-year grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. Learn more about the "Bridging the Academic-Policy Gap" program that will generate and disseminate policy-relevant research on pressing global issues.

Korbel School Hosts State Department Diplomat in Residence

DENVER—Jan. 12, 2017—Late in 2015, the Josef Korbel School was selected by the U.S. State Department to house a Diplomat in Residence whose assignment began in the fall of 2016. We are honored to welcome Stewart Devine, a career Foreign Service Officer, as our first Diplomat in Residence.

CORD Changes Name to Align with Mission

DENVER—Jan. 10, 2017—The Center on Rights Development has officially changed its name to the Center on Human Rights Education (COHRE).

2016
November 2016

Korbel School Post-Election Discussion Tackles Ramifications for Foreign Policy in a Trump Administration

DENVER—Nov. 9, 2016—A packed house at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies heard a discussion tonight on likely foreign and domestic policy ramifications from the 2016 U.S. election. The election of Donald J. Trump has upended the American political establishment, generated concern from many global leaders and elicited congratulations from others, including Russian president Vladimir Putin.

How I Learned Diplomacy Amidst Nuclear Tensions

DENVER—Nov. 4, 2016—On Oct. 21-22, I took part in the U.S. Army War College's International Strategic Crisis Negotiation Exercise—a unique opportunity to engage in simulated high-tension crisis negotiations and practice diplomacy around an international conflict. 

Homeland Security Students Visit Denver FBI Headquarters to Learn from Local Experts

DENVER—Nov. 2, 2016—Twenty students in the Josef Korbel School's International Security Master's Degree and Homeland Security Certificate Program visited the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) Division Field Office in Denver, Colorado, on October 28, to learn from local experts about counterterrorism, criminal investigations, counterintelligence and cyber crimes.

October 2016

Former NATO Secretary General talks about 'The Will to Lead'

DENVER—Oct. 17, 2016—Former NATO Secretary General Rasmussen spoke at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies on Monday at an event sponsored by the school's Colorado European Union Center of Excellence. He speech dealt mostly with his book, The Will to Lead: America's Indispensable Role in the Global Fight for Freedom.

September 2016

Remembering Helen Crossley, Public Opinion Research Pioneer

DENVER—Sept. 29, 2016—The Josef Korbel School community is saddened at the passing of Helen Crossley on September 25. Crossley's gift to to establish the Crossley Center for Public Opinion Research has benefitted and continues to benefit Korbel graduate students and the advancement of public opinion research related to domestic and foreign policy issues.

China Center Speaker Addresses the 'Dictator's Dilemma'

DENVER—Sept. 29, 2016—On September 28, George Washington University's Dr. Bruce Dickson spoke about the Chinese Communist Party's adaptability and ability to survive, and also debunked some common misunderstandings of the Chinese political and cultural environment often perpetuated by American and international media outlets.

Institute for Public Policy Studies Launches Fall Program Featuring Nationally-acclaimed Speakers

DENVER—Sept. 28, 2016—The Institute for Public Policy Studies announces an exciting fall program featuring three nationally acclaimed speakers: Michael E. O'Hanlon, senior fellow in Foreign Policy at the Brookings Institution; Jonathan Rauch, author of six books and contributing editor of National Journal and The Atlantic; and Amos Gelb, founder and director of the Washington Media Institute.

Vice President Joe Biden Surprises DU Students at Korbel Dinner Watch Party

DENVER—Sept. 23, 2016—On September 15, more than 700 people—alumni, faculty, staff, visitors and friends—came together to celebrate the successes of our school, our alumni and current students during the 19th Annual Josef Korbel School of International Studies' Korbel Dinner. The event benefits the Korbel School's numerous scholarship opportunities and programs.

Former Libyan Prime Minister Mahmoud Jibril to Speak at Korbel School

DENVER—Sept. 7, 2016—Dr. Mahmoud Jibril, former interim prime minister of Libya, will speak at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies on September 16. His discussion, "Making Sense of Libya Today," is hosted by the school's Pardee Center for International Futures and Center for Middle East Studies, and WorldDenver.

July 2016

Honorees Announced for 19th Annual Korbel Dinner

DENVER—July 1, 2016—Carrie and John Morgridge, along with Kent Thiry of DaVita, will be honored at the University of Denver's Korbel Dinner. Vice President Joe Biden will be the keynote speaker. The 19th annual dinner will take place on Thursday, Sept. 15, at the Ritchie Center on the DU campus.

Institute for Public Policy Studies Joins the Josef Korbel School

DENVER—July 1, 2016—The University of Denver's Institute for Public Policy Studies (IPPS), formerly housed in the School of Arts, Humanities & Social Sciences, officially joins the Josef Korbel School of International Studies effective July 1, 2016. The move leverages the complementary nature of IPPS and Josef Korbel School programs and marks the successful completion of a year-long planning process.

June 2016

19th Annual Korbel Dinner to Feature Vice President Joe Biden

DENVER—June 23, 2016—The University of Denver is honored to announce that Vice President Joe Biden will join guests at this year's annual Korbel Dinner on Thursday, Sept. 15 at the Ritchie Center on the DU campus. The Korbel Dinner, which is in its 19th year, honors Josef Korbel, the first dean and founder of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies and benefits the School's programs, scholarships and centers, which are designed to serve the School's students and the community at large.

Secretary Madeleine Korbel Albright Speaks at School's 2016 Graduate Breakfast Reception

DENVER—June 3, 2016—The Josef Korbel School today honored the Class of 2016 graduate students at a breakfast reception featuring Secretary Madeleine Korbel Albright, 64th U.S. Secretary of State and daughter of diplomat and dean Josef Korbel, for whom the school is named.

May 2016

Latin America Center Hosts Heraldo Muñoz, Chilean Foreign Minister and Distinguished Josef Korbel School Alumnus

DENVER--May 24, 2016--The Josef Korbel School's Latin America Center recently hosted distinguished alumnus Heraldo Muñoz for a two-day visit to the Josef Korbel School. In an informal discussion on May 6 with Josef Korbel School students, faculty and members of the greater Denver community, Muñoz shared his unique perspectives on Chile's foreign policy in an era of complex change.

Josef Korbel School's Center for China-US Cooperation Named Among the Top 100 China Studies Centers in the World

DENVER--May 20, 2016--The Journal of Overseas Sinology/China Studies, published in Beijing, announced the Josef Korbel School's Center for China-US Cooperation as one of the top China studies research institutes outside of mainland China.

Competitive Critical Language Scholarship (CLS) Awarded to Josef Korbel School Graduate Student

DENVER--May 17, 2016--Ms. Ayesha Hamza, an International Studies MA candidate at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, was awarded the nationally competitive Critical Language Scholarship (CLS). During the summer of 2016 she will study the Russian language in Nizhny Novgorod, Russia.

Josef Korbel School Hosts Sixth Annual Crisis Engagement and Negotiation Exercise (CENEX)

DENVER--May 9, 2016--The Josef Korbel School's annual Crisis Engagement and Negotiation Exercise (CENEX), is a two-day professional crisis simulation run by graduate students. Now in its sixth year, CENEX brings together over 70 students from the Korbel School's seven degree programs, as well as cadets from the Air Force academy in Colorado Springs.

April 2016

Three Josef Korbel School Graduate Students Receive Prestigious Boren Fellowship Awards

DENVER--April 27, 2016--Three Josef Korbel School graduate students were recently awarded the prestigious Boren Fellowship to improve their language skills and gain experience in countries critical to U.S. national security. Sara Hedlund, Carey Neill and Drew Pederson will travel to Bosnia, Latvia and Morocco to study the language and explore research questions related to democratic governance, state-society relations and the Arab Spring movement.

Korbel School Students Gain Insights Into Japanese History, Culture and Politics Through Participation in the Kakehashi Project 

DENVER—April 25, 2016—Last month, 23 graduate and undergraduate students from the Josef Korbel School of International Studies had the opportunity to visit Japan as participants in the Kakehashi Project. Sponsored by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of Japan, the Kakehashi Project is a fully-funded student exchange program between Japan and the United States.

Josef Korbel School's Sié Chéou-Kang Center Named Inaugural Home of the Journal of Global Security Studies

DENVER—April 21, 2016—The Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver, was recently appointed the inaugural home of the Journal of Global Security Studies. The journal addresses the need for scholarly interaction and debate across the broad field of security studies.

General George W. Casey Jr., Korbel Alumnus, Makes a Broad Impact During Spring Quarter 2016

DENVER—April 20, 2016—The Josef Korbel School was again honored to host alumnus General George W. Casey Jr. (Ret.) during a busy kick-off to the Spring Quarter, culminating with the presentation of an endowed scholarship that bears his name to Korbel School graduate student John Shattuck.

Korbel School Students Visit NORAD and USNORTHCOM Headquarters

DENVER—April 19, 2016—Students in the International Security Master's Degree and Homeland Security Certificate Program visited North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) Headquarters at Peterson AFB in Colorado Springs, Colorado.

Korbel School's Sié Chéou-Kang Center Awards 2016-2017 Post-Doctoral Fellowships

DENVER—April 13, 2016—The Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy at the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies has awarded post-doctoral fellowships for the 2016-2017 academic year to two outstanding junior scholars. Michael Kalin and Evan Perkoski will join the Sié Center team in September 2017. 

Interview with Alumnus Ibrahim Kazerooni, Imam of the Islamic Center of America

DENVER—April 5, 2016—Sheik Dr. Ibrahim Kazerooni, an alumnus of the University of Denver and Iliff School of Theology, was recently appointed Imam of the largest Islamic Center in the United States. Kazerooni, who earned a joint PhD in 2013 from the Josef Korbel School of International Studies and Iliff School of Theology, leads the Islamic Center of America in Dearborn, Michigan.

March 2016

Josef Korbel School Receives $1 Million Gift for New Public Opinion Research Center

DENVER—March 15, 2016—A new survey research center has been created at the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies with a $1 million gift from public opinion research pioneer and DU alumna Helen Crossley. The Crossley Center for Public Opinion Research will be Colorado's leading academic center for survey research. It will train students in American public opinion as well as international public opinion related to international policy issues.

Journal of Contemporary China Announces Inaugural John and Vivian Sabel Award for Best Article

DENVER—Mar. 6, 2016—The Journal of Contemporary China has awarded the inaugural Annual John and Vivian Sabel Award for best article to Professor Benjamin van Rooij of the University of California, Irvine. Professor van Rooij's article, "The People Vs. Pollution: Understanding Citizen Action against Pollution in China."

February 2016

University of Denver Among Peace Corps' 2016 Top Volunteer-Producing Colleges & Universities

DENVER—Feb. 18, 2016—The University of Denver is ranked No. 2 among graduate schools on the Peace Corps' 2016 Top Volunteer-Producing Colleges and Universities list. This is the fifth consecutive year that DU has ranked among the top five graduate schools. The Josef Korbel School of International Studies' participation in the Peace Corps Master's International Program is the key contributor to the University's continued high rankings.

January 2016

Undergraduate Cameron Hickert Named a Schwarzman Scholar 

DENVER—Jan. 12, 2016—Cameron Hickert, an International Studies undergraduate at the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies, was named a Schwarzman Scholar this week. Hickert is one of 111 recipients selected from a pool of 3,000 applicants.

2015
November 2015

Josef Korbel School Wins Prestigious Grants from National Science Foundation and Carnegie Corporation

DENVER—Nov. 10, 2015—The University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies has been awarded significant research grants from the National Science Foundation ($1.8 million) and the Carnegie Corporation ($1 million), building on the school’s upward trajectory in securing sponsored research.


Noted human trafficking scholar and activist Kevin Bales to speak at  University of Denver’s Human Trafficking Center

DENVERNov. 5, 2015Kevin Bales, co-founder of the organization Free the Slaves based in Washington, D.C., will speak as part of the Human Trafficking Center’s 2015-2016 Speaker Series on Friday, November 13 from 5:00-7:00 pm in the Anderson Academic Commons.


The Economist Names Josef Korbel School's ICAP Program and  Associate Professor Tom Rowe to the Global Diversity List

DENVER—Nov. 3, 2015—The Economist has named a program and an associate professor at the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies to its Global Diversity List . The list is a newly-established assessment of organizations and individuals with outstanding commitment to diversity, as nominated by readers of The Economist and judged by a panel of experts.  

October 2015

State Department Selects Josef Korbel School to House Diplomat in Residence

DENVER—Oct. 12, 2015—The Josef Korbel School of International Studies will house a Diplomat in Residence beginning in the fall of 2016. The announcement was made today in Denver by the Director General of the Foreign Service and Director of Human Resources at the Department of State, Arnold A. Chacon.


Video of Conversation Between DU Alumnus Mohammad Javad Zarif and Ambassador Christopher R. Hill Now Available

DENVER—Oct. 12, 2015—Watch the video of the on-stage conversation between DU Alumnus and Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif and Ambassador Christopher R. Hill, dean of the Josef Korbel School, held in New York City on October 5.


DU Alumnus Mohammad Javad Zarif Special Guest at NY Alumni Event

DENVER—Oct. 5, 2015—The Josef Korbel School hosted alumnus Mohammad Javad Zarif, Iran's Foreign Minister, at a special event in New York City, coinciding with Minister Zarif's attendance at the United Nations General Assembly. 

September 2015

Conflict Resolution Scholar John Paul Lederach Lectures on Peacebuilding

DENVER—Sept. 29, 2015—Internationally-renowned peace mediator and conflict resolution scholar John Paul Lederach was a guest lecturer today at the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies, debuting a series of October events during the 11th anniversary of Conflict Resolution Month in the state. 


Josef Korbel School China Scholar Ranked Among World's Most Influential

DENVER—Sept. 22, 2015—A University of Denver professor has been named one of the world’s most influential scholars on China’s international affairs, according to research by Shanghai International Studies University.


Chuck Hagel Receives University of Denver Global Security Award 

DENVER—Sept. 8, 2015—The University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies tonight honored three individuals who embody the School’s mission of meeting global challenges through practical knowledge and innovative thinking. Full Story

August 2015

University of Denver Josef Korbel School Hosts 18th Annual Korbel Dinner

DENVER—Aug. 5, 2015—The University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies is honored to announce that 24th U.S. Secretary of Defense Chuck Hagel will be our special guest at the 18th Annual Korbel Dinner. The dinner is scheduled for 7 p.m. on Sept. 8, 2015 at the Hyatt Regency Denver at Colorado Convention Center. Full Story

May 2015

Congratulations 2014/2015 Recipients of Fellowships

DENVER—May 27, 2015—Today, the Josef Korbel School of International Studies faculty and staff gathered to honor and congratulate the students who received fellowships and scholarships at its annual Fellowship Recognition Breakfast. Full Story


Korbel Students Visit North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) Headquarters

DENVER—May 18, 2015—On Friday, May 15, 2015, 24 Korbel students enrolled in Dr. Ben Gochman's graduate course, INTS 4989: North American Defense and Security visited North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) Headquarters at Peterson AFB in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Full Story

April 2015

Three Korbel Students Receive International Peace Scholarship

DENVER—April 30, 2015—The Philanthropic Educational Organization recently awarded scholarships totaling $10,000 each for three graduate students at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. Full Story


University of Denver Student Named 2015 Truman Scholar

DENVER—April 20, 2015—The University of Denver is excited to announce that junior Cameron Hickert, has been named a 2015 Truman Scholar. Hickert is one of 58 students selected from nearly 700 nominees across the nation, and the only student from a Colorado university. Full Story


Fifth Annual CENEX Highlights Nigerian Conflict with Boko Haram

DENVER—April 17, 2015—More than 90 students participated in the fifth annual Crisis Engagement and Negotiation Exercise (CENEX) hosted by the Josef Korbel School of International Studies.


The Josef Korbel School Welcomes President Toledo

DENVER—April 10, 2015—The Josef Korbel School of International Studies was honored to welcome former president of Peru, Alejandro Toledo. Toledo visited the School as part of the Center on Rights Development's annual symposium. Full Story


Korbel Student Attains Fulbright Scholarship, Anticipates Diversifying International Experience

DENVER—April 9, 2015—Tanner Mastaw hopes to expand his understanding of international development, and his recent obtainment of a Fulbright Scholarship is helping to pave the way. Full Story


Thank You General Casey

DENVER—April 3, 2015—In what has become a springtime tradition at DU, retired Army Gen. George Casey Jr. returned to campus in March and April to teach a two-week class at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. Full Story

February 2015

Expert Forecasts U.S. Dollar's Preeminence for the Next Two Decades

DENVER—Feb. 26, 2015—The U.S. dollar will remain the premiere international currency for at least the next twenty years in spite of the recent gains made by rival currencies, said one expert on international political economy. Full Story


Graduate Research and Performance Summit Fellows

DENVER—Feb 23, 2015—Two graduate students at Josef Korbel School of International Students took part in the second annual Graduate Research and Performance Summit on January 30, 2015. Kaylee Dolen and Matthew Bloise took advantage of the event to discuss their areas of greatest academic interest and discover what their fellow graduate students are working on. Full Story


Korbel Program Offers Networking Opportunities Among Students

DENVER—Feb. 19, 2015—A new program aims to link undergraduate and graduate students within the Josef Korbel School of International Studies in an effort to facilitate networking opportunities and share internship experiences among the student population. Full Story.


Professor Co-Signs Economic Statement Regarding Greek Financial Crisis

DENVER—Feb. 13, 2015—A professor of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies recently co-signed an economic statement welcoming Greece’s new government, while advocating cooperation among the international community in an effort to resolve the Greek financial crisis. Full Story


University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies Ranked #11 Globally Among Master’s Programs in International Relations

DENVER—Feb. 05, 2015— The University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies is ranked 11th in the world among master’s programs for policy careers in international relations. This is according to the January – February 2015 issue of Foreign Policy magazine. Full Story

2014
November 2014

Activist Stresses Effectiveness of Unarmed Civilian Protection During First Denver Dialogues on Peace and Security

DENVER—Nov. 19, 2014—Humanity has been conditioned to perceive violence as its god, said a leading peace activist Wednesday evening. Full Story


New International Studies Association Journal to be Housed in Sié Center

DENVER—Nov. 12, 2014—The Josef Korbel School of International Studies announced today that Professor Deborah Avant has been named the editor in chief of the Journal of Global Security Studies, the newest publication of the International Studies Association. The Journal will be housed in the School's Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security & Diplomacy. Full Story


Meet Rangel Fellow David Luna

DENVER—Nov. 12, 2014—David Luna, an International Security major and first year student at Josef Korbel School, is completing his graduate education with the help of a Rangel Fellowship. Full Story


Student Essay Published in International Journal of Humanities and Social Science

DENVER—Nov. 3, 2014—An International Development student attending Josef Korbel School recently published an article in the International Journal of Humanities and Social Science. The article, “Education and Gender in Contemporary Cambodia,” is the product of years of interest in the region for Mary N. Booth. Full Story


Josef Korbel School visiting scholar lectures on Islamist movements and the Arab Spring

DENVER—Nov. 1, 2014—The Center for Middle East Studies (CMES) at the Josef Korbel School held “Islamist Movements and the Arab Spring,” on October 29th. Abdullah Al-Arian, a visiting scholar at Josef Korbel School spoke on a variety of the most pressing issues in the Middle East.  Al-Arian's visit is made possible as part of a $294,200 Carnegie Corporation of New York Centennial Grant. The grant provides fellowships to U.S. universities in support of social scientists from the Arab region. Full Story

October 2014

Global Health Affairs and Humanitarian Assistance Programs Welcome Expert for Discussion on Ebola

DENVER—Oct. 24, 2014—The Global Health Affairs and Humanitarian Assistance Programs at the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies will welcome Sabrina Karim for a discussion on how the weak Liberian governance structure exacerbated the Ebola epidemic in that country. The discussion will take place on Wednesday, Oct. 29. Full Story


Experts Offer Assessments of China-U.S. Relations During Eighth Annual China Town Hall

DENVER—Oct. 17, 2014—Overlapping territorial claims and maritime rights among nations in South-East Asia, as well as conflicting Chinese and U.S. interests in the region, all require careful consideration from today’s policymakers, said an expert on U.S. diplomatic history in East Asia. Full Story.


Students Overwhelmingly Engage in the First International Strategic Crisis Negotiation Exercise

DENVER—Oct. 16, 2014—Fifty students participated last weekend in the first International Strategic Crisis Negotiation Exercise at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. Full Story


The Josef Korbel School Welcomes Three U.S. Army War College Fellows

DENVER—Oct. 8, 2014—The U.S. Army War College Fellows program at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies has grown to three participants – a welcome advancement during the school’s fifth year of involvement, said the program’s director. Full Story


Negotiating the Future of Tibet

DENVER—Oct. 3, 2014—Today, the Center for China-U.S. Cooperation held its first Jackson/Ho China Forum for the academic year titled “Negotiating the Future of Tibet: An Insider's Story.” Lodi Gyattsen Gyari, who served as the Special Envoy of His Holiness, the Dalai Lama, from 1990-2012, was the guest speaker. Full Story


 October is Conflict Resolution Month

DENVER—Oct. 1, 2014—October is Conflict Resolution Month in Colorado, and the University of Denver's Conflict Resolution Institute will participate in the month-long event. Full Story

September 2014

DU to Convene Global Experts on ISIS Crisis

DENVER — September 29, 2014 — Some of the leading experts in the world will gather Wednesday at the University of Denver to make sense of the ISIS crisis and the wider sectarian conflict that helped produce it. Full Story


 

Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security & Diplomacy Awarded Carnegie Corporation Grant

DENVER—Sept. 23, 2014—The University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies today announced that the Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy was awarded a $1 million, two-year grant from the Carnegie Corporation of New York. The grant is toward a “Bridging the Academic-Policy Gap” program that will generate and disseminate policy-relevant research on pressing global issues. Full Story


The University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School Broke Ground on the Anna and John J. Sie International Relations Complex

DENVER—Sept. 23, 2014—The University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies began a new era today with the ceremonial groundbreaking on the Anna and John J. Sie International Relations Complex—made possible by a generous $17 million donation by the Anna and John J. Sie Foundation. Full Story


The University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School Celebrates its 50th Anniversary

DENVER—Sept. 22, 2014—In 1964 scholar and diplomat Josef Korbel founded the school that would become the University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies. Tonight, the School’s extended community gathered at the Sheraton Denver Downtown to celebrate the School’s golden anniversary and to honor three individuals who embody the School’s mission and vision. Full Story


Putin's Game in Ukraine

DENVER—Sept. 12, 2014—Although Vladimir Putin will experience some early gains regarding Russia’s involvement in Ukraine, he will ultimately lose in the end, said a renowned university professor. Full Story


ISIS Crisis

DENVER—Sept. 8, 2014—Students at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies and community members at the University of Denver were invited to gain greater insight into an important but little understood international issue during a panel discussion at the Sie Cheou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy. Full Story


Global Issues and their Impact on the Future of Human Rights

DENVER—Sept. 7, 2014—Josef Korbel School Professor Micheline Ishay took part in a high level meeting of experts concerning the future of human rights and the international criminal justice system. Global Issues and Their Impact on the Future of Human Rights and International Criminal Justice, was held from Sept. 3-7 in Siracusa, Italy. The conference was held by the International Institute of Higher Studies in Criminal Sciences (ISISC). Full Story


Welcome to the Korbel Community

DENVER—Sept. 3, 2014—The Josef Korbel School began another exciting academic year with graduate orientation. Full Story


University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School Celebrates 50th Anniversary

DENVER—Sept. 2, 2014—The University of Denver’s Josef Korbel School of International Studies announced two-days of events to celebrate the 50th anniversary of its founding and to mark its ascent to the future. Both events will feature special guest Dr. Condoleezza Rice, an alumna of the School. Full Story


Sie Center to hire Three Post-Doctoral Fellows

The Sié Center is hiring three post-doctoral fellows that will be part of a new research, education, and policy program focused on nonviolent strategies in violent contexts. Apply Here

July 2014

The Josef Korbel School Announces the Kick-Off of its 50th Anniversary Celebration

DENVER—July 31, 2014—The Josef Korbel School of International Studies today announced that it will celebrate the 50th anniversary of its founding at the 2014 Korbel Dinner. Full Story


Korbel Conversation: Israel and Hamas

DENVER—July 19 2014—Today, MA Candidate Tali Grumet had the opportunity to sit with Professor Jonathan Adelman to ask him questions about the current conflict between Israel and Hamas. Watch Video

June 2014

Korbel Conversation: Iraq

DENVER—June 18 2014—Today, MA Candidate Alex Aumen had the opportunity to sit with the dean of the Josef Korbel School Christopher Hill to ask him questions about the current situation in Iraq.  Hill is the former Ambassador to Iraq.  Watch Video


Sexual Violence in Conflict Summit

DENVER—June 18, 2014—Last week the largest gathering ever brought together on sexual violence in conflict convened in London. Chen Reis, clinical associate professor at the Josef Korbel School, attended the summit and recently shared her thoughts. Full Story


Congratulations 2013/2014 Graduates

DENVER—June 6, 2014—Today, at a breakfast outside of Cherrington Hall, the Josef Korbel School of International Studies recognized the 230 graduates who received MA or PhD degrees during the 2013/2014 academic year. Full Story

May 2014

Students Visit NORAD and USNORTHCOM Headquarters

DENVER—May 30, 2014—Today, Josef Korbel School students enrolled in Dr. Ben Gochman's graduate course, INTS 4989: North American Defense and Security visited North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD) and United States Northern Command (USNORTHCOM) Headquarters at Peterson AFB in Colorado Springs, Colorado. Full Story


Josef Korbel School Congratulates 2014 Fellows

Denver—May 29, 2014—Today, the Josef Korbel School recognized students who have received competitive fellowships as well as the inaugural class of Korbel in Geneva. Full Story


Department of Defense Awards Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures a $1.05 Million Research Grant

DENVER—May 27, 2014—The University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies announced today that the Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures has been awarded a $1.05 million research grant as part of the Department of Defense's Minerva Initiative. The awarded project, "Taking Development (Im)Balance Seriously: Using New Approaches to Measure and Model State Fragility," will develop a new, more comprehensive index for measuring and monitoring state fragility in the future. Full Story


Roff Perkins to take part in CCW Meeting on Lethal Autonomous Weapons

DENVER—May 13, 2014—"Warfare will become, literally, dehumanized." That's according to Lecturer Heather Roff Perkins who will take part in The Convention on Certain Conventional Weapons meeting of experts on Lethal Autonomous Weapons Systems (LAWS) in Geneva, Switzerland beginning today through May 16, 2014.


Crossley Scholars to Participate in Leading Public Opinion Research Conference

DENVER—May 12, 2014—Two Josef Korbel School students will have the opportunity to work alongside some the nation's leading public opinion researchers at the American Association of Public Opinion Research national conference in Anaheim, California from May 15 – 19, 2014. Full Story


The University of Denver tops the list of 2014 Paul D. Coverdell Fellows Programs

DENVER—May 7, 2014—The University of Denver today announced that it ranks number one among Paul D. Coverdell Fellows Programs for returned Peace Corps volunteers. The University also ranks number four among Master's International Programs nationwide. Full Story


Frederick S. Pardee Donates $4M to the University of Denver

DENVER—May 1, 2014—The Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures at the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies announced today the receipt of a $4 million gift from their namesake Frederick S. Pardee. The donation by Pardee is in support of the Center's general endowment. Full Story

April 2014

Crisis in Ukraine

DENVER—Apr. 21, 2014—Today the Josef Korbel School kicked off the first event in a small series of discussions on the crisis in Ukraine with a panel moderated by Associate Professor Rachel Epstein, Co-Director of the Center for the Study of Europe and the World. Today's event featured the Josef Korbel School's Dean Christopher Hill and Professor Jonathan Adelman as well as Associate Professor Christoph Stefes (Ph.D., 2002) from the University of Colorado Denver. Full Story


Origins of Violence

DENVER—Apr. 17, 2014—Associate Professor Erica Chenoweth recently took part in a panel discussion and Q&A on the origins of violence. The panel also features Steven Pinker, Richard Wrangham, Adrian Raine, John Mueller and Sarah Mathew. Topics discussed include the development of violence from the brain to world war. Watch the Video


Chenoweth Launches "The Engaged"

DENVER—Apr. 9, 2014—There is a void in our academy and we would like you to help us fix it. This is the call to action from Associate Professor Erica Chenoweth and co-convener Christian Davenport from the University of Michigan on their newly launched website "The Engaged" part of an initiative to bring together scholars, students and citizens who wish to change the world. Full Story


The Josef Korbel School Welcomes Carnegie Corporation Centennial Fellow

DENVER—Apr. 1, 2014—The Josef Korbel School's Center for Middle East Studies is pleased to welcome visiting scholar Mohamad Hamas Elmasry from the American University in Cairo. Elmasry's visit is made possible as part of a $294,200 Carnegie Corporation of New York Centennial Grant. The Centennial Grant provides fellowships to U.S. universities in support of social scientists from the Arab region. Full Story


Hendrix and Glaser Cited in the Authoritative Global Report on Climate Change

DENVER—Apr. 1, 2014—The just-released Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC)'s Working Group II report "Climate Change 2014: Impacts, Adaptation, and Vulnerability" cites the work of Josef Korbel School of International Studies faculty member Cullen Hendrix and research scientist Sarah Glaser. Full Story

March 2014

University of Denver Receives $17 Million Donation

DENVER—Mar. 25, 2014—The University of Denver announced today the receipt of a $17 million gift from philanthropists Anna and John J. Sie.  The donation will support the University's Josef Korbel School of International Studies through the construction of a 43,000 square foot building and marks the largest single private gift in the Josef Korbel School's 50-year history. Full Story


CORD to Host 15th Annual Symposium

DENVER—Mar. 31, 2014—From April 2 through April 5, 2014 the Josef Korbel School's Center on Rights Development will host its 15th annual symposium.  The theme of this year's series of events is "Right to health." Discussion topics will include reproductive health, water and sanitation issues, psychosocial effects of war, mobile technology, and more. Full Story


The Josef Korbel School Launches HAARG

DENVER—Mar. 28, 2014—This year, the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies launched the Humanitarian Assistance Applied Research Group.  Through HAARG, an initiative of the School's Humanitarian Assistance program, students will gain hands-on experience, while providing needed services to humanitarian organizations. Full Story


Chenoweth Receives the Karl Deutsch Award

DENVER—Mar. 27, 2014—The University of Denver's Josef Korbel School congratulates Associate Professor Erica Chenoweth for receiving the International Studies Association's 2014 Karl Deutsch Award. Full Story


Global Health Affairs Welcomes Chase Adam, Co-Founder of Watsi

DENVER—Mar. 26, 2014—Chase Adam visited the Josef Korbel School to speak to students about his experience as co-founder of Watsi, a successful global crowdfunding platform for healthcare. Full Story


Pardee Center for International Futures Launches New Website

DENVER—Mar. 26, 2014—The Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures, the home of International Futures (IFs) model and a hub of long-term forecasting and global trend analysis at the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies, launched its new website on Tuesday. Full Story


Transformational Voices: An Afternoon with Leading Global Thinkers

DENVER—Mar. 6, 2014—On March 6, The Josef Korbel School and Sie Center hosted 6 of Foreign Policy magazine's Leading Global Thinkers. Full Story

February 2014

DU Graduate Students Claim Number One Spot on Peace Corps List

DENVER—Feb. 25, 2014—The University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies is the number one Peace Corps producing graduate school in the U.S. with 23 students currently serving abroad. Full Story


DU Hosts Historic Conversation with Iran's Foreign Minister via Live Web Conference

DENVER—Feb. 18, 2014—The University of Denver's Center for Middle East Studies at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies today held an event of historic magnitude—a conversation (via live web conference) with Dr. Mohammad Javad Zarif, the Minister of Foreign Affairs for the Islamic Republic of Iran. Full Story


DU to Host Conversation with Iran's Foreign Minister via Skype

DENVER—February 17, 2014—The University of Denver's Center for Middle East Studies at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies is pleased to announce an event of historic magnitude—a conversation (via Skype) with Dr. Mohammad Javad Zarif, the Minister of Foreign Affairs for the Islamic Republic of Iran. The conversation will take place Tuesday, February 18, at 12 p.m. in the Anderson Academic Commons on the DU campus. The conversation will be moderated by Ambassador Christopher Hill, dean of the Josef Korbel School. Full Story

2013
November 2013
Photo Gallery: Professor Zhao Speaks at Shanghai Ocean University

On November 5, 2013 Professor Suisheng (Sam) Zhao spoke at Shanghai Ocean University.  Zhao is the executive director of our school's Center for China-U.S. Cooperation and the founder and editor of the Journal of Contemporary China. View Photos

The Pardee Center welcomes NEPAD's Gengezi Mgidlana for Visit and Event

The Frederick S. Pardee Center is delighted to host Gengezi Mgidlana, Director of Strategy and Knowledge Management for the New Partnership for African Development (NEPAD), at the University of Denver's Josef Korbel School for two weeks. Full Story

Rothman Discusses Latest Volume of Patterns of Potential Human Progress

Josef Korbel School of International Studies Professor Dale RothmanOn Friday, November 1,The Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures Senior Scientist Dale Rothman discussed the latest volume of the Patterns of Potential Human Progress series, "Building Global Infrastructure: Forecasting the Next 50 Years." It is the fourth volume in the series. Full Story

October 2013
Seventh Annual China Town Hall

The Josef Korbel School's Center for China-U.S. Cooperation participated in the seventh annual China Town Hall—a national day of programming designed to provide Americans across the United States and beyond the opportunity to discuss China's rapid development and Sino-American relations. Full Story

Wild or Open? Questioning North Korea

A panel of distinguished North Korean specialists gathered at the 2013 World Knowledge Forum to discuss the issues facing the often controversial state due to its young new leader and a fledgling  nuclear policy. These experts discussed the state of a country caught in the crossfire of frequent international contention. At the forefront  of the discussion were the issues of nuclear armament, economic sanctions, and refugee acceptance. Full Story

The Role of Non-Violent Strategies in Violent Contexts

On October 10-12, the Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy hosted a workshop exploring "The Role of Non-Violent Strategies in Violent Contexts." The two-day workshop, held at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, examined how non-violent groups in violent environments affect security outcomes. Non-violent actors—particularly local civilians, NGOs, and transnational corporations—affect stability in conflict zones and the prospects for post-conflict development and governance. Full Story

September 2013
New Research Forecasts Challenges for Global Infrastructure Development

The world is in the midst of several major transitions in infrastructure. And though countries will likely improve their infrastructure networks substantially in the future, the current path points to millions of people without access to basic infrastructure, even by 2060. Full Story

Korbel in Geneva

The Josef Korbel School of International Studies today announced the formation of Korbel in Geneva, an academic program offered in partnership with the Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies. Full Story

Global Health Security in the 21st Century

Dr. Matthew Lim presented "Global Health Security in the 21st Century" as part of the Josef Korbel School Global Health Affairs program's annual fall quarter welcome lecture. Full Story

George W. Bush Speaks at 16th Annual Korbel Dinner

The University of Denver's Josef Korbel School for International Studies raised more than $670,000 – to support scholarships, faculty research and programs at its 16th Annual Korbel Dinner on Monday night. The sold out event featured two-term former President George W. Bush as its special guest and keynote speaker. Full Story

Welcome New Students

The Josef Korbel School of International Studies welcomed an incoming class of 214 MA candidates and five PhD candidates at the annual Exploring Korbel new student orientation. Full Story

August 2013
Josef Korbel School Alumnus Awarded Fulbright Scholarship

Scott Bleiweis (MA, International Studies, 2011) has been awarded a Fulbright U.S. Student Program scholarship to Bulgaria for an English Teaching Assistantship. For the 2013-14 academic year Bleiweis will teach high school English in the town of Vidin, Bulgaria. Full story

July 2013
University of Denver Statement Regarding the 2013 Korbel Dinner

We are honored and delighted to have President George W. Bush, the 43rd President of the United States of America, as a guest and keynote speaker at the 16th Annual Korbel Dinner.  The Josef Korbel School of International Studies is committed to serving the public good by presenting multiple points of view and promoting civil discourse among diverse individuals. Full statement

June 2013
Congratulations Graduates

Today the Josef Korbel School of International Studies recognizes its graduating class.  The festivities began with a reception at Ben M. Cherrington Hall.  Dean Christopher Hill congratulated the graduates on their accomplishments, wished the new alumni well in their future endeavors, and spoke about the future of the school. Full story

May 2013
Avant Receives Honorary Degree

Professor Deborah Avant, the Sié Chéou-Kang Chair for International Security and Diplomacy and Director of the Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy, received an honorary degree from the University of St. Gallen. Full story

NAVCO 2.0 Released

The University of Denver's Josef Korbel School of International Studies today announced the release of Nonviolent and Violent Campaigns and Outcomes (NAVCO) 2.0 dataset for download. Full story

Jagla and Gates Receive Boren Fellowships

Two Josef Korbel School graduate students have been awarded Boren Fellowships for the 2013-14 academic year. Full story

Josef Korbel School Professor Receives Kanishka Project Grant

Erica Chenoweth, assistant professor at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies, and Laura Dugan of the University of Maryland, were awarded funding from the Government of Canada to expand the Government Actions in Terror Environments (GATE) database to Canada. Full story

University of Denver Ranks No. 1 on Peace Corps' List of Top Paul D. Coverdell Fellows Programs

For the second consecutive year the University of Denver ranks No. 1 on Peace Corps' 2013 list of top Paul D. Coverdell Fellows programs. Currently, there are 56 DU returned Peace Corps volunteers (RPCVs) enrolled as students. Full story

Documentary Produced by Josef Korbel School Alumna

Hellen Kassa (BA '12) is gearing up for the premiere of the documentary she produced thanks to support she received from the University of Denver and Peter Van Arsdale, senior lecturer at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. Full story

Chenoweth Elected Councilor for the Peace Science Society (International)

Assistant Professor Erica Chenoweth was selected as one of eight councilors for the Peace Science Society (International). Chenoweth, who was elected by the organization's membership, will serve a 4 year term.  As a councilor, she will assist in the supervision of the PSS(I), an independent, nonprofit organization that encourages the development of peace analysis and conflict management ♦

Boeing CEO Visits the Josef Korbel School

"Cooperation and competition can coexist," said W. James McNerney, Jr., chairman of the board, president and chief executive officer of The Boeing Company, the world's largest aerospace company. Full story


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