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Josef Korbel School of International Studies

Josef Korbel School of International Studies Regional Emphasis on Africa

Regional Emphases

Africa

Since 2000 a number of targeted initiatives that bridge class work and community work in Africa have been initiated. These have featured Josef Korbel School students and professors in collaboration with professionals based at home and abroad. Partnering organizations have included Africa Today Associates, Project Education Sudan, Rotary International, and LIONS (Leadership Institute Of New Sudan). Josef Korbel School's Students for Africa group sponsors a wide range of seminars, film screenings, and community outreach activities.  The student-run Center On Rights Development (CORD) regularly features the intersection of African and human rights themes, including those analyzing human trafficking. Others work with African immigrants and refugees close to home, in metro Denver. These include students who have served as interns at (e.g.) the African Community Center, the Rocky Mountain Survivors Center, and Lutheran Refugee Services.

Students are encouraged to engage in important work inside and outside the classroom. For example, six students during 2009/2010 authored papers on the challenges of peace building in six African nations; their efforts were funded by the Carnegie Foundation through a project sponsored by Prof. Tim Sisk. During the same period, another student served as an intern with Gen. Scott Gration, President Obama's special envoy to Sudan.  Four students worked in Kibera, Kenya (under the advisement of Professors Randall Kuhn and Peter Van Arsdale, plus faculty in other departments), to enhance the sanitation capacity of Africa's largest slum. During 2009/2010, approximately a dozen students (including undergraduates) worked in Africa through internship, study abroad, and applied research assignments.

Writ large, themes of importance to those at Josef Korbel School working with African issues currently include genocide (e.g., in Sudan), food security (e.g., in Ethiopia), refugee and IDP resettlement (e.g., in Rwanda), extractive industries (e.g., in Democratic Republic of Congo), alternative peace building strategies (e.g., in South Africa), military relations (e.g., in Djibouti), child soldiering (e.g., in Sierra Leone), and disability rights (e.g., in Uganda).

Faculty

Peter Van Arsdale | Adjunct Professor and Director, African Initiatives | 303-871-3281 | [email protected]

Peter W. Van Arsdale, Ph.D., is Director of African Initiatives at the University of Denver, Josef Korbel School of International Studies, where he also serves as Adjunct Professor. He is a Senior Researcher for eCrossCulture Corporation, based in Colorado. An applied cultural anthropologist, he has worked in E. Africa, S.E. Asia, the Balkans, Latin America, and North America, emphasizing community water resources, human rights, refugee resettlement, and humanitarian intervention. He is a noted author, journal editor, and former president of the National Association for the Practice of Anthropology and known analytically for his "tree of rights" and his "theory of obligation." He is co-founder of The Denver Hospice, and co-discoverer of a band of previously uncontacted Citak or Korowai people in Indonesian New Guinea. Since 1979, he has been a fellow of The Explorers.

Marie Berry | Assistant Professor | [email protected]

Marie Berry is an Assistant Professor at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver, where she is an affiliate of the Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy. She is a political sociologist, with a primary focus on violence, gender, and politics. Her first book, War, Women, and Power: From Violence to Mobilization in Rwanda and Bosnia-Herzegovina (Cambridge University Press 2018), examines the impact of war and genocide on women's political mobilization in Rwanda and Bosnia.

Tom Farer | University Professor and Former Dean| [email protected]

Tom Farer is University Professor at the University of Denver, a position he assumed after serving for fourteen years (1996-2010) as Dean of the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. He previously served as President of the University of New Mexico, of the Inter- American Commission on Human Rights, and of the Association of Professional School of International Studies (APSIA). He has been a fellow of the Council on Foreign Relations, the Carnegie Endowment and The Wilson Center for International Scholars in Washington, D.C. He has worked in the Department of State as special assistant to the Assistant Secretary for Inter-American Affairs and in the Department of Defense as special assistant to the General Counsel. He has consulted for Amnesty International, Human Rights Watch, and other human rights organizations. At the United Nations he served as legal advisor to the UN operation in Somalia (1993) where decades earlier he had served as law and karate instructor to the National Police force.

Cullen Hendrix | Assistant Professor|[email protected]

Dr. Cullen Hendrix is Director of the Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy and Associate Professor at the Korbel School of International Studies, University of Denver, Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Peterson Institute for International Economics, and Senior Research Advisor at the Center for Climate & Security. With Idean Salehyan, he created and maintains the Social Conflict Analysis Database. He is also a regular contributor at Political Violence @ a Glance and a member of the Political Instability Task Force and Africa Board of Experts. He holds research appointments at the University of Texas at Austin and the Colorado School of Mines, and is Associate Editor of the Journal of Peace Research

Timothy D. Sisk | Professor, Associate Dean for Research, and Director, Program on Fragile States, Sié Chéou-Kang Center for International Security and Diplomacy | 303-871-2998 | [email protected]

Dr. Timothy Sisk is Professor at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. Dr. Sisk is presently chairperson of the University of Denver's Institutional Review Board for Human Subjects Protection, a review body that oversees research for compliance with federal regulation and advancement of contemporary best practices in human-subjects research. His research has focused on the management of conflict in deeply divided societies, especially those emerging from civil war. He has conducted extensive research on the role of international and regional organizations, particularly the United Nations, in peace operations, peacemaking, and peacebuilding with particular attention to the role of democracy and governance and electoral processes in conflict-affected countries. He is also an Associate Fellow of the Geneva Center for Security Policy, Geneva Switzerland. Prior to joining the University of Denver in 1998, Dr. Sisk was a Program Officer and Research Scholar in the Grant Program of the United States Institute of Peace in Washington.

Jonathan Moyer|Assistant Professor| [email protected]

Jonathan D. Moyer is Assistant Professor at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies and Director of the Frederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures. In that role, Jonathan has worked with the New Partnership for African Development (NEPAD) Agency in their technical analysis supporting the African Union Agenda 2063 project. He is also the co-founder of the African Futures Project, a collaboration between the Institute for Security Studies (a Pan-African think tank) and the Pardee Center.

Singumbe Muyeba|Assistant Professor|[email protected]

Singumbe Muyeba is Assistant Professor of African Studies at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies. He teaches a course in political Economy of sustainable development in Africa, economic development and an undergraduate course in African development. He holds a PhD in Sociology and MPhil in Development Studies from the University of Cape Town in South Africa, and a BA from University of Zambia. He was a Fox International Fellow at Yale University. His research interests are in African development, urbanization, property rights to land and housing, foreign aid and institutions.

Student groups and initiatives

Course offerings with substantial African content

  • INTS 4601: Development Forecasting
  • INTS 4602: Human Rights, Needs, and Duties
  • INTS 4603: Sustainable Development
  • INTS 4606: Global Health
  • INTS 4612: Community Health
  • INTS 4611: Relief to Development Gap
  • INTS 4616: Ethics, Education, and Change
  • INTS 4617: Youth Development
  • INTS 4368: HIV/AIDS in international affairs
  • INTS 4468: Politics of development
  • INTS 4493: Humanitarian aid in complex emergencies
  • INTS 4594/95: Civil wars and international responses
  • INTS 4705: Democratization in Africa
  • INTS 4711: Politics of democracy and development
  • INTS 4935: International humanitarian law of armed conflict
  • INTS 4936: International law and human rights
  • INTS 4937: Human rights and the international refugee system
  • INTS 4955: Human rights practicum
  • INTS 4966: Applied field methods
  • INTS 4939: Human rights: genocide
  • INTS 4987: Contemporary slavery/human trafficking
  • INTS 4991: Independent study (whereby students can work with an advisor and focus on an issue/issues in a specific region of the world)

Denver - Africa related resources