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Race, Inequality and Social Change (RISC)

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Course List


RISC attributed courses are courses where students and instructors interrogate power, ideology, and the perpetuation of inequity through course content and discussions

Race, Inequality and Social Change (RISC)

Course List

As is outlined in the mission of RISC, RISC attributed courses are courses where students and instructors interrogate power, ideology, and the perpetuation of inequity through course content and discussions. RISC courses are also interdisciplinary and committed to the public good as centrally informed by racial, ethnic, and cultural inequalities.

Below you will find courses offered over the next year that fit within the mission of RISC. Please note that there may be other courses that also fit under RISC that are not shown in this list. If you find a course that is not listed below but fits within the mission of RISC, please email the course information to risc@du.edu.

Undergraduate

Advanced Seminar (ASEM)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
ASEM Sex and Globalization Lindsey Feitz Over the last thirty years scholars from a variety of disparate fields have laid claim on the study of the complex, pervasive phenomena that many now simply refer to as “globalization.”  More recently, however, feminist scholars in these same fields have argued that globalization is also an inherently gendered (and sexed and raced) phenomenon that has profound consequences on people’s livelihoods, identities, and well-being around the world.   This course will examine globalization as a process that centers upon these gendered, raced, and sexual differences.  You will be introduced to range of interdisciplinary feminist scholarship and asked to consider the following questions:  What does a gendered analysis of globalization look like?  How does it enhance our understanding of the ways power, privilege and inequality manifest themselves in different parts of the world?   In what ways do women and men get enlisted to support (both physically and symbolically) global commerce, migration, and war. Winter 2017, Winter 2018
ASEM 2419 Girl Power: Gender in Media Taylor Nygard This course employs an interdisciplinary feminist lens to explore the historical construction and meaning of gender and "girlhood" in contemporary American media culture. It explores how the various discourses of girlhood are constructed through media images and stories about female youth in mainstream culture. Students learn and practice different forms of critical writing. Completion of all other Common Curriculum requirements is required before registering for this class. Spring 2017
ASEM 2465 Environmental Controversies Christina Fouse What is "the environment?" How do we (as humans, citizens, Colorado residents, etc.) define our relationship with it? How should we construct our relationship with it? By interweaving various perspectives from rhetorical theory, a history of environmental discourses, and contemporary environmental controversies, this course explores answers to these basic questions. In particular, we will cover a history of the US environmental movement around 5 main discourses: preservation, conservation, anti-toxics advocacy, environmental justice, and global justice. We feature 4 contemporary environmental controversies that relate to these discourses, notably: opening the arctic national wildlife refuge for oil drilling; corporate farming; Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository; and fracking in CO. Through readings, discussions, and assignments, we will foster a critical orientation toward environmental controversies. This will include interrogating the persuasiveness of arguments and evidence deployed in various environmental controversies; considering the ethics of various advocates' rhetorical expressions; and considering perspectives that may differ from our own. As this course cultivates critical thinking skills, it also seeks to help you find and enhance your own voice as an informed citizen and advocate—not by simply repeating others' discourse, but by thoughtfully considering the quarter's various rhetorical perspectives, and coming to your own decision about important environmental issues. As a writing intensive course, we are especially concerned with strengthening our voice as writers through a great deal of practice and revision over the quarter. ASEM 2465 is particularly relevant to the study of Race, Inequality, and Social Change (RISC), for we explore environmental racism and environmental justice, which entails understanding definitions of racism within and outside of the environment. Furthermore, course materials will explore RISC, notably, the Yucca Mountain case study and environmental racism in the Niger River Delta. We bring a critique of the whiteness in the environmental movement through our discussions of preservation/conservation, which tended to define the environment "out there" as nature, against urban spaces--especially poor areas and neighborhoods of color. Winter 2017
ASEM 2620 Inventing America Darrin Hicks This class introduces students to exemplary public documents, primarily in the form of speeches, which address the promises set out in the preamble of the U.S. Declaration of Independence: the rights to life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness. The course traces how these promises have been articulated by a succession of public actors ranging from U.S. Presidents to members of radical political factions. The course always addresses three major political movements: (1) the movement for political inclusion of Blacks, beginning with early abolitionists and extending to the struggle for civil rights, including the black power movement; (2) the movement for the political inclusion of women, beginning with the suffragists and extending to include feminism, including the fights over sexual freedom; and (3) the struggle over economic rights, beginning with early U.S. socialist and anarchist movements and extending into the contest over the creation and pruning of the U.S. welfare system. Fall 2016
ASEM 2728 Gender, Race and Class in Media Rachel Liberman This course focuses on the intersections of media culture and three identity markers: gender, race, and class. As a fundamental source of the signification of identity, media forms becomes social tools, an therefore must be understood as a system that reflects and shapes our lives. This course explores the importance of this process and equips students with the means to critically analyze media texts and production. Winter 2017
Counseling Psychology (CNP)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
CNP 4773 Multicultural Counseling: Psychosocial Issues Pat Garriott This course includes activities designed to help students examine their experiences with privilege and oppression broadly, but includes a very targeted focus on race and ethnicity. Issues of power and marginalization are explored as they relate to the life experiences and mental health of people of color in the U.S. Relevant topics include: microaggressions, implicit bias, aversive racism, historical (racial) trauma, and white privilege. Thus, the course integrates information from the fields of psychology, sociology, law, and genetics. Students are required to engage in immersion experiences via a "Bias Project," in which they develop and implement a plan to address a demonstrated bias toward a targeted group (via the implicit association test) over the course of the quarter. Spring 2017
Applied Communication (COMM)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
COMM 4035 Intercultural Communication Maggie Red Important benefits can result from the ability to communicate effectively across cultural differences.  Benefits include:  healthier communities, increased commerce, enhanced personal growth, a mutual understanding, and reduced conflict.  Culture, defined as an accumulated pattern of values, beliefs, and behaviors shared by an identifiable group of people with a common history and verbal and nonverbal code system, pervades every aspect of the communicative process (Neuliep, 2015, p. xvi).  Effective intercultural communication, which refers to the face-to face interaction between a minimum of two persons from different cultures who come together and exchange verbal and nonverbal symbols (p. 24), requires an understanding of what impact context and power may have on communication.  This course will focus on the communication that occurs between different groups as defined by race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation and socio-economic status to understand what impact these cultural identities can have on communicative interactions.  A contextual and critical communication approach will be used to examine the ways that differences in culture, context, and power operate to impact communications in the work environment.  We will identify and analyze obstacles and barriers to effective intercultural communication.  Finally, we will examine strategies and skills needed to become a competent intercultural communicator.  Fall 2017
Communication (COMN)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
COMN 2220 Race and Popular Culture Armond Towns This course examines trajectories of representations of race in popular culture (i.e., film, music, television), both produced by the dominant culture, as well as self-produced by various racial and ethnic groups. Through a historical perspective, we trace images in popular culture and how those images are tied to contemporary events of the time. We pay particular attention not only to the specific archetypes that exist, but also how those archetypes are nuanced or colored differently through the lenses of ethnicity, nationality, race, class, gender, and sexuality. This course counts toward the Analytical Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement.  Fall 2016
English (ENGL)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
ENGL 2715 Native American Literature Billy Stratton Native American Literature explores the relationships between contemporary Native American narratives and Native American oral traditions. We will examine the intellectual underpinnings of Native American literary expressions, focusing on tribally specific Native American concepts of language, perception, and process in relation to Native cultural and political survival. This course aims to celebrate Native American cultural expression through lectures and discussion, group work and intellectual exercises. Fall 2016
First-Year Seminar (FSEM)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
FSEM From Acknowledging Privilege to Practicing Inclusive Excellence Frederique Chevillot What is Inclusive Excellence and why should I care? These are the two fundamental questions to which we will find provocative and life-changing answers in a ten-week journey together. We will be reading The Matrix Reader: examining the dynamics of oppression and privilege, by Abby L. Ferber, Christina M. Jiménez, Andrea O'Reilly Herrera, & Dena R. Samuels. This comprehensive reader presents a collection of interdisciplinary and intersectional theoretical and critical essays, personal testimonies and reflections, poems, etc. We live in a richly multicultural society where our religious, linguistic and socio-economic histories and situations vary greatly. Changing demographics in our country, and in the world, will make future employers want to hire individuals who have developed the skills to be successful leaders in an increasingly diverse society. Unearned privileges, unexamined assumptions, fear of responsibility, unintentional prejudice by many perpetuates oppression experienced by others. Learning how to genuinely practice Inclusive Excellence takes courage and intelligence; it requires risk-taking and leadership skills, and it concerns all of us. Through weekly readings, daily journaling, short critical papers, guest speakers' presentations, visits to organizations dedicated to social justice, we will learn reflecting upon, and practicing, inclusive excellence. Students will be required to research and write a final project on a specific aspect of the practice of IE. Fall 2016
FSEM 1111-97 FSEM: Looking Beyond Beyoncé: Millennial Feminism and A New Fourth Wave Lindsey Feitz What does "feminism" look like today? What bearing does it have on young women's understandings of themselves and others? To help answer these questions, this class begins by examining the complex history of the fight for women's rights in the USA and the twists and turns that have led many to declare that we're living in a "new era" of millennial feminism. We'll pay specific attention to the relationship women of color, queer folks, and men have had in helping feminism evolve. During the second half of class we'll investigate the relationship between popular culture and feminism today- what does it mean when celebrities like Beyoncé identify themselves as feminists and how does this impact public debates and advocacy? Throughout the quarter, we'll put our reading and scholarship to work in a community-based research project that will investigate the status of young women at DU, as well as propose solutions for outreach, advocacy, and education. Fall 2017, Fall 2018
Gender and Women's Studies (GWST)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
  Feminist Qualitative Research Methods and Design (for GWST majors only) Lindsey Feitz This course will introduce the fundamental elements of feminist qualitative research methods and design.  We will begin by examining various research methods, including ethnography, interviews, oral history, media studies/discourse analysis, and community-based research and analyze the ways in which they aid (and help counter) ways of knowing and understanding the social world.  In addition to gaining awareness of the more commonly used qualitative and ethnographic methodologies, you will be challenged to think critically about the mechanics, ethics, and politics of such research, including the role of researcher within it.  Through numerous in-class exercises, readings, and field assignments, by the end of this class you will be to articulate, practice, and evaluate qualitative methods that shape feminist research projects Fall 2017, Fall 2018
  Selling Sex, Gender and the American Dream, 1950-Present Lindsey Feitz Since 9/11, promoting consumer spending has become an unofficial U.S.-state strategy to reassure the American public that their freedoms and "way of life" are still intact. This same rhetoric has also been deployed globally in an effort to preserve the United States image as the world's lone super power. At some point, the freedom to consume has become equated with, or possibly even replaced, the political freedoms associated with "the American Dream." How did this happen? To answer this question, this introductory class analyzes how commercial culture, or "cultures of consumption" have evolved as the defining cornerstone of American life over the last sixty years. The first half of the quarter we will examine key historical moments including the Cold War, the Civil Rights/Women's and Gay Liberation movements and investigate how women, ethnic minorities, and members of the LGBTQ community evolved into important "consumer citizens" in the United States. The second half of the quarter will examine these same social groups from a contemporary perspective. Spring 2017, Spring 2018
  GWST Capstone Course (for GWST majors only) Lindsey Feitz This 4-credit capstone course is designed to serve as the culmination of the GWST major course of study. The course is designed to facilitate students' individualized projects, which will demonstrate integration of GWST core areas of knowledge: i.e. feminist and/or queer theory; intersectionality; history; identity and rhetoric; and/or institutional contexts for understanding gender and sexuality. Projects can range from internships to theses, but at minimum this 4-credit capstone requires a final paper of at least 20 pages in length which draws upon gender, feminist, and/or queer theory in order to frame research on a specific topic. In addition, this capstone course requires all participants to submit a GWST final portfolio (including a 5-7 page portfolio narrative) that demonstrates student learning throughout the GWST major. Finally, this course requires active peer-review of student works-in-progress, especially during weeks 6,7, and 8. Winter 2017, Winter 2018
  Gender, Activism, and Social Change Hava Gordon The study of gender, activism, and social change is fundamentally the study of how and why groups collectively try to make social change around gender, sexuality, and related issues of embodiment.  Although the forms of gender-based movements range from highly structured to wildly spontaneous, these movements are capable of exerting a powerful influence over gender and sexuality as it operates in our social networks, institutions, power structures, cultures, and even our selves and our identities.  They have radically altered the course of history and continue to do so.  But, these movements can also be difficult- and dangerous- to construct and sustain.  This class will delve into the dynamics of diverse social movements around gender, particularly as they intersect with other axes of social power such as race, class, disability, and age. Winter 2017
GWST 1112 Introduction to Gender and Women's Studies Lindsey Feitz/Hava Gordon This course provides an introduction to the discipline of Gender and Women's Studies. All cultures engage in a complex process of assigning cultural values and social roles which vary according to the cultural environment in which human interaction occurs. Among these, the process of translating biological differences into a complex system of gender remains one of the most important. Gender and Women's Studies aims to understand how this process of 'gendering' occurs, and its larger effects in society. This course also explores how this system of meaning relates to other systems of allocating power, including socioeconomic class, social status, ethnicity, religion, sexuality, and nationality. Using this lens, this course explores contemporary social developments and problems. Gender and Women's Studies is about studying, but it is also about meaningful engagement with the world. This class presents students with a variety of types of texts from sociological articles to literary fictions, and documentary and fictional cinema to explore gender from many different directions. Fall/Spring 2017, Fall/Spring 2018
Honors (HNRS)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
HNRS 2400 Honors Seminar: Social Approaches to Health Helen Hazen A growing body of literature considers human health through the lens of power, in response to the inequities in health and access to health care that we find among different populations. A variety of sub-fields have developed within this social approach to analyzing health care, including scholars focusing on race, sexual identity, and disability, in particular. In this class, we will explore how this theoretical approach of using power and privilege to analyze health issues can be applied in a variety of different contexts. For instance, we will consider how race has become such a key indicator of health status in the US, moving beyond genetic explanations of health status to studies that argue that socioeconomic status confounds any clear picture of the role of race and then onto studies that argue that racial identity itself is a key influence on health with social stress, marginalization and discrimination identified as key stressors on the human body. We will also consider how we can consider health from different perspectives, exploring the authority of scientific understandings of the body at the expense of more holistic interpretations of health. Is a scientific understanding of the body an appropriate way to define 'ability' and 'disability', for instance? How are 'disabled' scholars questioning traditional privileges in order to navigate and reinterpret their own health status? The first half of the course will focus on discussion of broad themes that underpin critical approaches to health geography: culture, identity, power, and sense of place. These sessions will incorporate a brief lecture and then extensive discussion of themes that arise from that topic, based around a particular case study. The second half of the quarter will be student led, with students working in pairs or threes to guide the content of, and discussion in, subsequent classes. A major part of the class will be the opportunity for each student to work with the instructor outside class time to develop expertise in a particular topic and then develop a strong plan for sharing this expertise with other students during one class period. Fall 2016
Media Film Journalism Studies (MFJS)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
MFJS 2210 Introduction to Media & Culture Rachel Liberman This course introduces students to the organization of the U.S. media industries and their historical and contemporary role in U.S. culture, focusing specifically on the role of media in relation to power, ideology, representation, and the perpetuation of inequities. This section devotes a significant amount of time to intergroup dialogue and the fostering of intercultural competence in relation to race and ethnicity to promote conscious and inclusive communities. The course counts toward the Scientific Inquiry: Society and Culture requirement. Fall 2016, Winter 2017, Spring 2017
MFJS 3150 Activist Media Adrienne Russell Today's alternative cultures use internet and mobile technologies to access and circulate mainstream information, but also to rapidly exchange information that exists outside mainstream media channels. Activist movements today with access to digital tools and networks are no longer dependent on newspapers and broadcast networks to represent them and to disseminate their messages. We are, however, just beginning to see how the proliferation of alternative networks of communication, and the content, practices, and identities they facilitate, interact with traditional political and business organizations, as well as with traditional media products and practices. This course focuses on media activism over the past half-century tied to various social movements with an emphasis on contemporary protest movements and their use of new and old media tools and strategies. Spring 2017
MFJS 3440 Global & Multicultural Campaigns Margie Thompson    
MFJS 3652/4652 Culture, Gender & Global Communication Margie Thompson This course explores the ways in which culture, gender, and communication intersect and shape a variety of issues from an international and intercultural perspective. Using a global feminist perspective, it also focuses on paradigms and paradigm shifts in creating social change. Also explored are alternative paradigms of thought, action and media communications by women and indigenous peoples, which have often been ignored, discounted or buried in history. Spring 2017
MFJS 3655 Multicultural Journalism Margie Thompson Whether it be media coverage of the controversy over racial imbalance of the Academy Awards or an immigration march in downtown Denver, or campus newspaper articles about transgendered students, or health organizations with a blog about intercultural health issues between doctors and immigrant or refugee patients, cultural and intercultural communication understanding and skills are vital today for journalists, media producers and writers. Through a variety of creative exercises and writing assignments that employ journalistic writing as a creative process and craft, students are encouraged to find and develop their own voices as multicultural writers and journalists. Winter 2017
MFJS 4654 Intercultural Communication Margie Thompson Global workforces are rich with multicultural diversity. Inherent in this diversity is a network of cultural traditions, values, and communication styles. Thus, there is a need for intercultural and diversity training in the corporate world, the nonprofit world, and in education. This graduate level course will illustrate intercultural concepts and processes that require training, including culture shock and adaptation, cultural dialectics, expatriate/repatriation, self reflexivity, etc. and offer learners the tools and skills they need to train on these concepts, including conducting needs assessments, defining learning outcomes, and designing and facilitating intercultural trainings. Fall 2016
Sociology (SOCI)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
SOCI 2240 Sociology of Health Karen Albright This course explores questions of how individuals experience health and illness, how they interact with institutions and providers, and how these experiences are filtered through social structures that lead to inequality. Using a sociological perspective, we analyze how individuals' experiences of health and illness, medical institutions, and work in the health professions are influenced by racial/ethnic background, gender, social class, sexual identity, and age. We analyze these concepts by looking at who gets to define health and illness as well as how medical decisions are made, including who has the right to make decisions, what are the limits on the kinds of decisions that can be made, and how are decisions enforced and challenged by law. Prerequisite: SOCI 1810 or permission of instructor. Fall 2016
SOCI 2320 Race and Ethnic Relations Raul Nguyen-Perez Relationship of racial and ethnic minority groups to systems of social stratification; emphasis on United States Fall 2016
SOCI 2420 Social Inequality Lisa Martinez Examines racial inequality in the context of the larger themes of the course including the design of inequality, the patterns and processes at play in producing inequality, and the intersections of inequality, including along the lines of social class, race/ethnicity, and gender. Topics covered include social mobility and immobility, inequality in various institutions such as education, housing, and politics, and the relationship between inequality and social policies. Fall 2016, Fall 2017
SOCI 2655 Latinas/os in American Society Lisa Martinez This course will use a sociological lens to understand Latina/os' experiences in the U.S. Specifically, we will address demographic shifts; assimilation and acculturation; racial/ethnic identity formation; families, households, the workplace, and the culture; and struggles over civil rights, educational equality, and political representation. In so doing, we will discuss and challenge stereotypes about Latina/os, present alternative perspectives about Latina/o experiences in the U.S., and most importantly, understand their contributions to their families, their communities, and to the nation as a whole. In sum, students will leave the course with a thorough understanding of the major social, economic and political institutions that define and are being defined by the growing and dynamic presence of Latinas/os in contemporary American society. Winter 2017
Spanish (SPAN)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
SPAN 2350 Latin American Culture and Societies Salvador Mercado An introductory and interdisciplinary course on the political, historical, and cultural dynamics that have shaped Latin America, the Caribbean and U.S. Latinos. An examination of the political and intellectual movements and economic forces embedded in relations of power from pre-Colombian civilizations, colonialism, independence, nation building, and imperialism to the struggle for democracy. Analysis of diverse cultural practices such as literature, music, film, and visual art within a national and transnational context. Prerequisite: SPAN 2100 or equivalent. Fall 2016
SPAN 3600 Caribbean Blackness: Conflictive Identity (El Caribe Negro) Salvador Mercado   Winter 2017
SPAN 3700 Bodies, Sex, and Power in Imperial Spain". [This course is taught in Spanish] Chad Leahy This course broadly interrogates the body as a site of political and social struggle in the 16th and 17th centuries in the context of Imperial Spain (understood to include both the colonial Indies and Iberia), with particular focus on constructions of race and gender. By recovering an epistemology of the body that was used to legitimize the control, exploitation, or marginalization of individuals and groups through recourse to ideas stemming from fields including medicine, theology, philosophy, climatology, and astrology, this course engages with critical historical problems germane to the concerns of RISC.  
SPAN 3700 Of convivencia and conflict: Islam, Christianity, and Judaism in Iberia. [This course is taught in Spanish] Chad Leahy This course studies the complex political, social, legal, economic, and cultural relationships that existed between Jews, Christians, and Muslims in Iberia in the period roughly from 711 to 1650. Of particular relevance for RISC, this course studies the mechanisms by which 'difference' (racial, social, religious) was regulated and manipulated, with increasing emphasis on a radicalized ideology of 'blood' and 'blood purity' beginning at the end of the 14th century in Iberia, leading eventually to the massive expulsions of Iberia's Jews (1492) and Moriscos, or Muslims forcibly converted to Christianity (1609-1614)./td>  
SPAN 3800 Central American Blackness: Forgotten Roots (Centro América Negra) Salvador Mercado   Spring 2017

 

Graduate

Counseling Psychology (CNP)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
CNP 4794 Counseling Psychology Seminar: Psychology of Social Class, Classism, and Work Pat Garriott This course interrogates issues related to race-based power, ideology, and inequality by providing a historical perspective on the use of race in policy and law to inform class-tiered systems of work in the U.S. Current issues related to race, ethnicity, class, and work are also examined (e.g., immigration and low-wage work; implicit bias and racism in hiring practices). This class also incorporates experiential and immersion opportunities through a course assignment which requires students to produce a report on "best practices" for career services with economically marginalized populations (who tend to be disproportionately represented by communities of color). This involves consultation with at least one outside agency. A research project is also required, and in the past year involved a systematic review and analysis of attention to multicultural content in four major vocational psychology journals. Fall 2016
Communication (COMN)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
  Fanon and Communication Armond Towns In this course, students will engage with the work of psychologist and revolutionary activist Frantz Fanon. Fanon is best known for his critique of Freud and Hegelian dialectics for their reliance (and inability to acknowledge) the import of blackness to their presumably neutral, universal findings. Fanon's research has been taken up politically by the Black Panther Party, the National Liberation Front (Algeria), the Chicano/a Movement and #BlackLivesMatter. In academia, he has had a major impact on fields as diverse as African American studies, post colonial studies, women's studies, and affect theory. While communication studies has been slow to take up Fanon's work, this class situates his work (along with that of his predecessors) as central to communication theory. Winter 2017
COMN 4701  Cultural Studies Armond Towns This course introduces students to the central tenets of British Cultural Studies. Following the work of Stuart Hall, Doreen Massey, Hazel Carby, Paul Gilroy, and others, students will learn about the difficulty of interdisciplinary scholarship and the role of cultural studies in normalizing such work. By placing an emphasis on race, class, gender, and sexuality, among other things, this class pushes students question the role of power in the construction of civil society. By the end of the class, students will have a better sense of how the social, political, economical, ideological, and cultural overlap in ways that normalize hierarchies. Fall 2016
Graduate School of Professional Psychology (GSPP)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
GSPP The Social Psychology of Racism and Oppression Lynett Henderson Metzger   Winter 2017, Winter 2018
GSPP Sociocultural Issues in Forensic Psychology Lynett Henderson Metzger   Winter 2017, Winter 2018
Graduate School of Social Work (SOWK)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
SOWK Power, Privilege and Oppression from a Critical Multicultural Perspective Karen Bensen This course examines the phenomenon of oppression of diverse populations and its effect on multicultural social work practice. The course is intended to increase awareness of multidimensional aspects of race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socioeconomic status and people with disabilities, as well as other multicultural issues in interventions with individuals, families, organizations, and communities. Fall 2017
SOWK Social & Environmental Impact Assessment Sarah Bexell Social and environmental impact assessments are important tools for analyzing and managing both the intended and unintended consequences of development projects on human and ecological systems in order to bring about a more equitable and sustainable social ecological system. This class will incorporate an understanding of the history and concepts of the three levels of impact assessments (micro, mezzo, and macro) into the research process that is the core of social impact assessments. Students will be able to prepare and evaluate social ecological impact assessments through learning to identify and define problems, select theoretical frameworks appropriate to the problem, identify research questions, design a study appropriate for the identified questions, gather and analyze data, and write the final assessment. Particular attention will be paid to assessing the affects of interventions on vulnerable populations. Other topics will focus on the practical aspects of project team selection and management, timelines, and the communication of findings to stakeholders. Fall 2016
SOWK International Social Development Sarah Bexell Social development is a process of planned instructional change to bring about a better correspondence between human needs and social policies and programs. This class focuses primarily on the developing world with particular emphasis on transitional economies. Practice-oriented, the class is geared toward a knowledge of policy-making for human security and the skills required for local social development. *This is an elective methods/skills course in the Sustainable Development and Global Practice concentration and is open to students from other concentrations. Spring 2017
SOWK4990 Social Work and Social Justice in South Africa Karen Bensen This course expands student's readiness toward interdisciplinary and multi-cultural coordination with individuals, groups and families and with diverse communities. Cape Town, South Africa will be the setting for this course because of its rich racial, ethnic, socio-economic and political diversity. We partner with a local NGO, Educo Africa, which has vast experiences with working with local NGO's and institutions in the Black and Coloured townships in and around Cape Town. Readings and in-country experiences will address culture, history, political and economic concerns in this post-apartheid country. Students will partner with local South African social and human services providers to gain a better understanding of the strategies of service delivery and community development. In addition to readings and daily reflective learning discussions, students will engage in several community immersion activities, participate in historical community tours, and partner with local service providers. The course is primarily designed for students with an interest in global practice, sustainable development, social entrepreneurship, micro enterprise interventions, and the interface of global development, social justice and social policies. The course is intentionally designed not to be cultural voyeurism, tourism or a means to provide charity. The course will focus strongly on capacity building and empowerment strategies and provide an opportunity for students to learn from community residents. Students will come away from this course with a strong understanding the issues facing communities and the citizens of South Africa. Fall 2016, Fall 2017
SOWK4232 Advanced muticultural practice: Critical Race Theory Praxis Lecturer Advanced Multicultural Practice: Critical Race Theory Praxis is a micro-, mezzo-, and macro practice course that uses the fundamentals of Critical Race Theory (CRT) as a framework for contextualizing and intervening with client systems. This course is a values elective for all concentrations. CRT is used as a framework to examine, critique, and challenge the way that race and racism is unwittingly sustained and perpetuated by traditional social work approaches to the amelioration of personal and social ills. Through this course, students learn the central tenets of CRT, how to evaluate traditional social work practice using these tenets, and begin to design to design a professional social work practice that uses CRT tenets as a foundation for micro-, mezzo-, and macro-level interventions. This course is offered within the concentration curriculum as a Values for Practice course to assist in the training and preparation of social workers practicing with historical underrepresented and marginalized clients and communities of color. Students develop skills and techniques grounded in anti-oppressive culturally grounded social work practice. Winter 2017
SOWK4759 Global Cultural Perspectives: Consensus and Conundrums Sarah Bexell Social workers increasingly practice in global communities both nationally and internationally.  Changes in practice environments demand that social work practitioners are informed citizens of comparative cultures and societies. This course examines the values and ethics of social work practice in a global context of power, privilege and oppression. Course materials and educational experiences will be used to challenge students to examine ethical and value-based conundrums when practicing in global settings and to develop practice skills to enhance the health, well-being and sustainability of communities. Through the use of case studies, critical thinking, cultural inventories and reflexivity the course will both support and challenge students' personal growth and professional practice. Spring 2017
SOWK4790 Human Sexuality Karen Bensen This course integrates human sexuality in the thinking and practice of social workers. By viewing sexual behavior from the social work perspective, the student is prepared to assume a significant role in helping clients and couples deal with issues of human sexuality. Content focuses on contemporary American sexuality, including material on sexual dysfunction and human sexual behaviors. Diversity–related content in this course addresses sexually oppressed client groups including the elderly, those expressing gender variance and diverse sexual orientations, persons with disabilities, and persons surviving sexual trauma or abuse, as well as persons who have committed sexual offenses. Winter 2017
International Studies (INTS)
Course Title Instructor Description Offered
INTS 4517 The Politics of Deeply Divided Societies Timothy Sisk Intrastate conflict continues to be, since the end of the Cold War, the primary threat to international peace and security. Most intrastate conflicts reflect or are driven by social cleavages along ethnic, religious or indigenous group lines. Recent crises of rapid escalation of identity-related violence at the national or communal level in Central African Republic, Egypt, Nigeria, Iraq, Lebanon, Nepal, Sri Lanka, Syria, Ukraine or South Sudan suggest the ongoing need for better understanding of the nature of contemporary religious, ethnic, sectarian, and other social dimensions of conflict. In turn, the escalation of identity-based conflicts into genocide and ethnic cleansing has historically generated differing responses by the international community, raising puzzling questions about emerging global norms such as the "Responsibility to Protect" and overall global commitments to intervening in states to prevent genocide ethnic killing, genocide, or crimes against humanity. Winter 2017