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Academic Resources

Learning Effectiveness Program

About Us

Learning Effectiveness Program

About Us

The Learning Effectiveness Program (LEP) was founded in 1982 as an academic support program for University students with learning disabilities. Since then we have developed some of the most comprehensive and innovative support services provided at the post-secondary level. Our nationally recognized program serves over 300 students each year.

The LEP is student-centered, student-focused program. It is also student-directed. This means that the student is expected to take the lead in using the resources and support available through LEP. We can guide, direct, recommend, and encourage, but the student has to make it happen.

THE FOUR CORNERSTONES OF LEP STUDENT DEVELOPMENT

The Four Cornerstones of LEP Student Development create a developmental path that all students in the LEP walk down. These Four Cornerstones include Self-Awareness, Self-Advocacy, Accountability, and Self-Determination. Throughout their time in the LEP, and hopefully beyond, the goal is for students to strengthen the skills related to the Four Cornerstones by continually addressing and answering the questions associated with each Cornerstone.

Students who benefit the most from the LEP commit to:

• Meeting every week with their LEP Academic Counselor for 45 to 60 minutes.
• Showing up for all appointments on time and prepared with relevant questions.
• Being open and honest with their counselor in order for the counselor to be most helpful to the student.
• Completing the 10-week calendar to use throughout the quarter.
• Tracking their class attendance, assignments, and grades.
• Proactively signing up for tutoring early in the quarter.
• Learning how to anticipate when extra support and guidance is needed
• Identifying, locating, and accessing appropriate resources when needed.
• Understanding all available LEP resources and being proactive with utilizing them.
• Meeting with their professors to ask questions and get clarification
• Dedicating approximately 20 hours a week outside of class on studying and doing homework.
• Being proactive as opposed to reactive with their commitments (academic, personal, and social).
• Maintaining their physical health through nutritious meals, regular exercise, sufficient sleep, consistent medication management, and regular hygiene practices.
• Cultivating and maintaining healthy relationships.
• Accessing appropriate mental health resources if and when the need arises.

Students who approach their academic workload proactively typically report the most satisfaction with the results they get. They assertively work and plan ahead, they sign up for tutors at the beginning of each quarter, they attend academic counseling meetings each week, and they identify and know how to access resources before they need them whenever possible.