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Daniel Felix Ritchie School of Engineering & Computer Science Department of Computer Science

Computer Science

Undergraduate Degree Programs

BA Applied Computing

The Bachelor of Arts in Applied Computing (BA in AC) provides a quality education for the serious computer user. It complements the Department's Bachelor of Science in Computer Science by providing a program which combines collaboration with other departments and an applications-oriented emphasis. A prospective BA in AC major must satisfy all the requirements for the Bachelor of Arts degree as outlined in the University Undergraduate Bulletin.

The BA in AC is a suitable degree for many collaborative programs within the University. This major was developed in consultation with the Department of Mass Communication, which, jointly with the Department of Art and Art History and this Department, has offered the Bachelor of Arts in Digital Media Studies. A minor or double major in digital media studies and applied computing complement each other perfectly.

The BA in AC would be ideal for students in graphics arts and electronic publishing, and would provide an appropriate foundation for a student who wishes to pursue a career in the emerging field of education technology. A graduate with the BA in AC would be very attractive in the data processing unit of large financial, banking, or insurance institutions, as a network or systems administrator in a similar firm, or as a World Wide Web designer/programmer. Holders of the BA in AC degree would also be well suited to continue in any number of specialized Master's or Certificate programs in fields as diverse as video and graphics production, fashion design, telecommunications, instructional technology or management information systems.

Total Credit Hours:

183 qrt. hrs.

Required Courses:

COMP 1671 Introduction to Computer Science I
COMP 1672 Introduction to Computer Science II
COMP 2300 Discrete Structures in Computer Science
COMP 2370 Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
COMP 2673 Introduction to Computer Science III
COMP 3421 Database Organization and Management I

Other Requirements:

45 credit hours of computer science or other approved courses is required, of which 25 hours must be at or above the 2000 level. Per University requirements, no more than 60 hours of courses in any one department can be applied toward the BA degree.

Elective Courses:

The choice of elective depends solely on the anticipated needs of the student. The following list suggests typical advanced Departmental courses that a student might take. It is strongly suggested that courses and direction of study be chosen in consultation with a departmental advisor.

COMP 2400 Software Tools - 4 qrt. hrs.
COMP 2901 Computing and Society - 4 qrt. hrs.
COMP 3410 World Wide Web - 4 qrt. hrs.
COMP 3361 Operating Systems I - 4 qrt. hrs.

Here are some typical courses from other departments that might establish areas of interest for students in the Applied Computing major. Several of these classes have prerequisites (not listed here) that students need to be aware of. A student will typically be minoring or double majoring in another department and will have usually been prepared for a course listed here. No more than 16 credit hours can be applied to the BA in AC from other units. Students will choose appropriate sequences in consultation with an advisor from the other department and with the approval of an advisor in the Department of Computer Science.

ARTD 2345 Typography - 4 qrt. hrs.
ARTD 2355 Net Art and Design - 4 qrt. hrs.
GEOG 3140 GIS Database and Design - 4qrt. hrs.
MCOM 3211 Introduction to Interactive Media - 4qrt. hrs.
MUAC 3050 Electronic Music Technology - 4qrt. hrs.
MUAC 3055 Commercial Composition and Arranging - 4qrt. hrs.

Sample Program:

A sample curriculum for the degree is available here . Since there are many variations to this schedule, students should select their own schedule in consultation with an academic advisor from The Department of Computer Science.

BA Game Development

The Bachelor of Arts in Game Development is a degree which prepares students to be capable of creating artistic content for games while having a strong technical background, enabling them to bridge the gap between artist and programmer. The BA requires a double major, one in Game Development, and one in Digital Media Studies, Electronic Media Art Design, or Studio Art. A graduate of this program will be able to both a developer and an artist, which serves well in art, programming and game design. To learn more, click here.

Total Credit Hours:

183 qrt. hrs.

Required Courses:

COMP 1671 Introduction to Computer Science I
COMP 1672 Introduction to Computer Science II
COMP 2300 Discrete Structures in Computer Science
COMP 2355 Introduction to Systems Programming
COMP 2370 Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
COMP 2673 Introduction to Computer Science III
EDPX 3600 3D Modeling
COMP 3705 Game Design
COMP 3705 Game Capstone I
COMP 3705 Game Capstone II
COMP 3821 Game Programming I

Other Requirements:

The BA requires a minimum of 48 credit hours of Computer Science and Emergent Digital Practices classes. In addition to the 11 required COMP and EDPX courses listed above totaling 40 credit hours, two additional electives are chosen and approved in consultation with your advisor and includes choices from AI for Games, Computer Animation, Advanced Graphics, Operating Systems, Computer Networking, Network Games, Game Design, Digital Audio Production I, Digital Audio Productions II, Topics in Game Programming and Topics in Game Design.

In addition, the BA in Game Development requires a minor in Emergent Digital Practices or Studio Art. Note that EDPX 3600 does not count towards this minor. Also, per University requirements, no more than 60 hours of courses in any one department can be applied toward the BA degree.

See the following web pages for specifics of major requirements for the allied fields.

Emergent Digital Practices

Sample Program:

A sample curriculum for the degree is available here . Since there are many variations to this schedule, students should select their own schedule in consultation with an academic advisor from The Department of Computer Science.

BS Game Development

The Bachelor of Science in Game Development is a combination of a Computer Science degree with a minor in mathematics, a second minor of your choice, and a cognate of 5 approved classes from Art and Emergent Digital Practices. This list of classes will be determined in collaboration with the Art Department and the Emergent Digital Practices programs. In addition, both degrees require satisfying the University Common Curriculum requirements for BS degrees. 

This program provides a strong computer science and technical background, preparing students for all aspects of game programming, while providing them with (I) a foundation in art that includes both appreciation and understanding of the significance of art, with some ability to create art themselves, or (II) a foundation in the critical, technical and design foundations in digital media studies. Thus, graduates of this program are able to help in the programming and development of games, while understanding and being able to communicate effectively with the artists who are part of any game development project. The BS in Game Development requires more mathematics and more required COMP classes than the BA and is balanced with fewer classes in the allied fields. To learn more, download PDF of the 2014-2015 Undergraduate Bulletin

Total Credit Hours:

183 qrt. hrs.

Required Courses:

COMP 1671 Introduction to Computer Science I
COMP 1672 Introduction to Computer Science II
COMP 2300 Discrete Structures in Computer Science
COMP 2355 Introduction to Systems Programming
COMP 2370 Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
COMP 2673 Introduction to Computer Science III
COMP 2691 Introduction to Computer Organization
COMP 2821 Introduction to Game Design
COMP 3361 Operating Systems I
COMP 3801 Introduction to Computer Graphics
COMP 3821 Game Programming I
COMP 3822 Game Programming II
COMP 3831 Game Capstone I
COMP 3832 Game Capstone II

Other Requirements: 

Students who intend to obtain a B.S. in Game Development must satisfy all the requirements of the Bachelor of Science degree as outlined in the University of Denver Undergraduate Bulletin. One of the two minor areas required in the B.S. program must be in mathematics. The other minor may be in any field. 

In addition, five approved allied field classes from Art or Emergent Digital Practices to fulfill the cognate are required. These courses can be combined with the second minor of the student's choice. A non-exhaustive list of courses for the cognate can be found at the Game Development Program website.

These 14 courses total 52 credit hours. An additional 8 hours of 3000-level computer science electives are required. COMP 2400 or COMP 2555 may be used to satisfy 4 credits of the required 3000-level elective credits, but COMP 3904 may not be used in this way. In addition, 16 hours of mathematics electives must all be at the 1000-level or higher and at least 4 of the 16 quarter hours must be at the 2000 or higher level.

There is considerable flexibility in scheduling. Students may select game development as their major in the second (sophomore) year and complete the game development major and mathematics minor requirements in the remaining three years with little difficulty. It might be possible to complete the major and minor requirements in two years provided the student has completed all other degree requirements (including the non-mathematics minor) in the first two years and is prepared to take a heavy load of computer science and mathematics courses.

Sample Program:

A sample curriculum for the degree is available here . Since there are many variations to this schedule, students should select their own schedule in consultation with an academic advisor from The Department of Computer Science.

BS Computer Science

Computer Science encompasses the theory and techniques by which information is encoded, stored, communicated, transformed, and analyzed. It is concerned with the theory of algorithms (that is, effective procedures or programs), with the structure of languages for the expression of algorithms, and with the design of algorithms for the solution of practical problems. A central concern is the study of the computer systems (hardware and software) for the automatic execution of these algorithms.

The Department of Computer Science at the University of Denver offers a Bachelor of Science in Computer Science. The degree is strongly based in mathematics and, in fact, a student will automatically acquire sufficient credits for a minor in mathematics. One additional minor is required. The second minor may be in any discipline other than mathematics or computer science.

Total Credit Hours:

183 qtr. hrs.

Required Courses: 

COMP 1671 Introduction to Computer Science I
COMP 1672 Introduction to Computer Science II
COMP 2300 Discrete Structures in Computer Science
COMP 2355 Introduction to Systems Programming
COMP 2370 Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
COMP 2673 Introduction to Computer Science III
COMP 2691 Introduction to Computer Organization
COMP 3351 Programming Languages
COMP 3361 Operating Systems I

Other Requirements: 

Students who intend to obtain a B.S. in Computer Science must satisfy all the requirements of the Bachelor of Science degree as outlined in the University of Denver Undergraduate Bulletin. One of the two minor areas required in the B.S. program must be in mathematics. The other minor may be in any field. 

The nine courses listed above total 36 quarter hours. An additional 20 hours of 3000-level computer science electives are required. COMP 2400 or COMP2555 may be used to satisfy 4 credits of the required 3000-level elective credits, but COMP 3904 may not be used in this way. In addition, 16 hours of mathematics electives must all be at the 1000-level or higher and at least 4 of the 16 quarter hours must be at the 2000 or higher level.

There is considerable flexibility in scheduling. Students may select computer science as their major in the second (sophomore) year and complete the computer science major and mathematics minor requirements in the remaining three years with little difficulty. It might be possible to complete the major and minor requirements in two years provided the student has completed all other degree requirements (including the non-mathematics minor) in the first two years and is prepared to take a heavy load of computer science and mathematics courses.

Sample Program:

A sample curriculum for the degree is available here . Since there are many variations to this schedule, students should select their own schedule in consultation with an academic advisor from the department of Computer Science. The sample also lists electives that can be taken to develop expertise in one of the research concentrations of the department.

Only two COMP electives are needed in senior year, but often a sequence starts in the fall so it may be best to take the two during fall/winter quarters.

All electives, especially the MATH and COMP electives, should be selected in close consultation with an academic advisor from the Computer Science Department. The courses for the non-mathematics minor should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor from the department in which the minor is administered.

Dual Degree BS+MS Computer Science

The Department of Computer Science at the University of Denver offers a Dual Degree Bachelor of Science and Masters in Computer Science. The BS/MS in Computer Science encompasses the theory and techniques by which information is encoded, stored, communicated, transformed, and analyzed. It is concerned with the theory of algorithms (that is, effective procedures or programs), with the structure of languages for the expression of algorithms, and with the design of algorithms for the solution of practical problems. A central concern is the study of the computer systems (hardware and software) for the automatic execution of these algorithms prepares students for advancement in academic or industrial careers. The program is designed to provide students with a breadth of advanced knowledge in computer science, while permitting them to achieve depth in areas of current interest within the computing field, as well as the emerging technologies that will be gaining importance in the future.

The degree is strongly based in mathematics and, in fact, a student will automatically acquire sufficient credits for a minor in mathematics. One additional minor is required. The second minor may be in any discipline other than mathematics or computer science.

Total Credit Hours:

183 (BS) + 36 (MS) = 219 qtr. hrs.

Required Courses: 

COMP 1671 Introduction to Computer Science I
COMP 1672 Introduction to Computer Science II
COMP 2300 Discrete Structures in Computer Science
COMP 2355 Introduction to Systems Programming
COMP 2370 Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures
COMP 2673 Introduction to Computer Science III
COMP 2691 Introduction to Computer Organization
COMP 3351 Programming Languages
COMP 3361 Operating Systems I
COMP 3371 Advanced Data Structures and Algorithms
COMP 3200 Discrete Structures

Other Requirements: 

Students who intend to obtain a BS+MS in Computer Science must satisfy all the requirements of the Bachelor of Science degree as outlined in the University of Denver Undergraduate Bulletin. One of the two minor areas required in the B.S. program must be in mathematics. The other minor may be in any field. 

The eleven courses listed above total 44 quarter hours. An additional 28 hours of 3000-level computer science electives are required. COMP 2400, COMP 2901 or COMP 2555 may be used to satisfy 8 credits of the required 3000-level elective credits, but COMP 3904 may not be used in this way. In addition 3 COMP courses at the 4000-level (other than COMP 4991) are required of which at least one must be a designated "theory" class and one must be a designated "Advanced Programming" course. Completion of three quarters of COMP4600 Seminar (0 credits) is also required.

Advanced Programming Requirement:

Students must also choose and complete two courses from the following list of COMP courses that include an advanced programming component. Students must complete at least two of the courses listed below at the University of Denver. These courses must be approved by an advisor. The current pre-approved list includes:

COMP 3352 Elements of Compiler Design
COMP 3353 Compiler Construction
COMP 3621 Computer Networking
COMP 3422 Database Organization & Management II
COMP 3801 Introduction to Computer Graphics
COMP 3802 Advanced Computer Graphics

Mathe Minor Requirement:

Minimum of 20 quarter hours in MATH courses numbered 1951 or higher. Discrete Structures in Computer Science (COMP 2300) may be counted toward the math minor. Courses not covered by the foregoing two sentences must be approved in writing by a mathematics faculty advisor.

For students entering DU Fall 2010 or later: At least 50% of the required credit hours for minor must be completed at the University of Denver

Sample Program:

A sample curriculum for the degree is available here . Since there are many variations to this schedule, students should select their own schedule in consultation with an academic advisor from the department of Computer Science. The sample also lists electives that can be taken to develop expertise in one of the research concentrations of the department.

All electives, especially the MATH and COMP electives, should be selected in close consultation with an academic advisor from the Computer Science Department. The courses for the non-mathematics minor should be selected in consultation with an academic advisor from the department in which the minor is administered.

Minor in Computer Science

To receive a minor in computer science, a student must complete a minimum of 20 quarter hours in computer science courses including Introduction to Computer Science I/II/III (COMP 1671/1672/2673). Students are encouraged to take Introduction to Discrete Structures (COMP 2300) and Introduction to Algorithms and Data Structures (COMP 2370). Additional courses are subject to advance written approval by an advisor from the computer science faculty.



A sample curriculum is available here for download. It also lists electives that a student can take to develop expertise in one the research concentrations of the department.