2021 Summit Schedule

January - March 2021

Thank you for attending the 2021 Diversity Summit! Recordings of the events can be found below.

Virtual programming for the 2021 Diversity Summit took place over seven weeks from January 21 - March 5.

We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable individuals of all abilities to engage fully. Closed-captioning is available for all recorded events.  If you would like to request additional accommodations to access recorded events, please email inclusion@du.edu.

Mary Reed Hall

View Session Recordings on YouTube

Celebrating its 20th anniversary, the Diversity Summit at the University of Denver harnesses the connective potential of our experiences, personal realities, and learnings, forging a path forward beyond diversity through concerted, meaningful, and combined efforts.

View the Diversity Summit YouTube Playlist Here

Week 1: DU Context - Where are we now?

January 20 - January 22

We will open the 20th anniversary of the 'Diversity Summit: We Rise Beyond Diversity' with conversations about our current moment. How do we respond to the inequities and indignities created by the current crises of pandemic, protest, and politic? Where are we at with the 2020-2021 DEI Action Plan? How does the data inform how we continuously work toward equity? Join us as we ground our understanding of DU in local and national contexts. 

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | DU Grand Challenges Forum: Centering Antiracism in community-University Partnerships

    View the Event Recording Here

     

    Brief lightning talks on collaboration for workers’ human rights set the stage for a conversation about antiracism and action.

    Join Farmworker Advocacy Project Members:

    • Kasey Neiss (Data Activist & Systems Manager, Frontline Farming)
    • Gabrielle Hyde (4th Year Student, Anthropology)
    • Zoi Johns (3rd Year Student, Anthropology & International Relations)
    • Alejandro Cerón (Associate Professor, Anthropology)

    For more inspiration + consideration, watch @CCESL social media!

    Co-Sponsored by: CCESL, Faculty of Color Association, IRISE

    DU Grand Challenges Forum 1.20.21
  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Opening Session: The Politics of DEI and the Future of Higher Education

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    On January 20, 2021, we will witness the transition of executive power in the United States with the inauguration of Joseph R. Biden as the 46th president of the United States. Serving as his is Vice-President is Kamala Harris, the first woman and person of color to serve in this capacity in the history of the nation. As symbols of a pluralistic democracy, President Biden and Vice-President Harris's authority to govern and lead compassionately as well as inclusively was not only questioned, but seriously undermined by decades of dog-whistles, anti-intellectual hostility, and a disdain for diversity and inclusion.

    As we reflect over the last year and imagine our near future, how does DU's commitments and values to DEI prepare our community to be critically engaged as leaders in responding to the inequities and indignities created by the current crises of pandemic, protest, and politic?

    • Jeremy Haefner, Chancellor
    • Mary Clark, Provost and Executive Vice Chancellor
    • Todd C. Adams, Vice Chancellor of Student Affairs
    • Jerron Lowe, Interim Vice Chancellor of Human Resources
    • Tom Romero, Interim Vice Chancellor of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Data and DEI: The Demographic Landscape at DU

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    Data--its collection, analysis, and decision-making utility--plays a critical role in the work of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) efforts on campus. However, for many the various types, uses, and operational needs for data complicate our collective understandings and potential story-making capacity via data.

    For this session, the Offices of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, Equal Opportunity, and Institutional Research will provide some snapshots of the university's DEI data, as well as engage in a conversation about data governance, the DU data landscape, and the complexities, nuances, and possibilities of data-based DEI decision-making.

    • Kristin Deal, Director of ODEI
    • Christopher Pena, Director of Data Management, Institutional Research
    • Rufina Hernandez, Associate Director of Equal Opportunity and Title IX
    • Tom Romero, Interim Vice Chancellor of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion
    • Emily Babb, Associate Vice Chancellor of Equal Opportunity and Title IX

Week 2: DU Context - Grounding our understanding in DU's history

January 25 - January 29

This week, we will look back at DU's history and the history of the Diversity Summit. Join us for sessions with DU alumni and other experts as we explore what got us to our present moment.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Indigenous History & DU

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    If we are to take an honest look at DU's history, we as a university must critically explore and consider DU's engagements with our Indigenous communities. In this session, members of our faculty will lead us in a discussion of the John Evans Report, what DU has done in response to the report, and other moments in DU's history that provide a greater understanding of our the university's history continues to play out in our current realities.

    • Dr. Angela Parker
    • Dr. Ramona Beltrán
    • Dr. Nancy Wadsworth 
  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | 20 Years Later: A Conversation with the Summit Founders

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    In 2001, DU hosted its first Diversity Summit. Dr. Jesus Trevino and Dr. Lamont Sellers helped students launch this important event, deepening DU's discussions of and commitment to the work of DEI. Twenty years later, Dr. Trevino and Dr. Sellers will join us in conversation about the summit's beginnings, the trajectory of DEI work since 2001, and help us think about the future possibilities of the summit.

    • Moderator: Kristin Deal
    • Jesus Treviño
    • Lamont Sellers

    Also today, we commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Promoting Environmental Justice in BIPOC Communities

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    *This event is part of the Center for Sustainability's Sustainability Conference

    The profession of social work has a long history of promoting environmental justice within vulnerable communities. Social workers can play an important role in engaging with the BlPOC community to promote environmental justice, especially regarding access to safe and healthy housing, food, and air. This panel will provide a call to action for the profession of social work to further fight environmental racism in partnership with BIPOC communities and critiques the profession’s history of centering Whiteness in its interventions. An emphasis is placed upon decolonizing social work practice in the regards of intervening where environmental racism is present utilizing an eco-centric approach and centering BlPOC voices. This work cannot be done by social workers alone and must be an interdisciplinary effort as diverse expertise and perspectives are valued in promoting equitable systems. Advocacy efforts on part of social workers in partnership with other professions may include advancing environmentally just policies and restorative approaches to building equitable food and housing systems.

    Presenters:

    • Rachel Forbes
    • Anna Craggs
    • Kylee Peterson
    • Sarah Wochele
    A poster describing the time and date of the Sustainability Conference
  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Future Gazing: A Conversation and Lab to Explore Hopes Fears, and the Next Stage of Human Existence

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    *This event is hosted by The Interdisciplinary Research Institute for the Study of (In)Equality (IRISE).

    Historically, and certainly, over the last four years, minoritized communities have been faced with a daily barrage of traumatic assaults that have forced us to constantly be in battle for our lives. This conversation will begin to explore what we can envision beyond these struggles toward a future of radical imagination and creativity. We hope it will give us some inspiration and a moment of collective exhalation.

    Flyer for the Future Gazing event featuring the speakers

Week 3: Knowledge & Capacity Building

February 1 - February 5

This week, we will collectively consider the locations of race and racism in both national and Denver specific contexts. Our panelists will help us critically engage in thinking through the ways in which race and racism have shaped our present realities. Additionally, Chancellor Jeremy Haefner will talk with Judge Gary Jackson about Judge Jackson’s experience growing up in Denver and becoming a leader and change-maker in the legal community, having served as one of Denver’s only Black judges.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Adversity, Accomplishment, and Advocacy: The Life and Career of Denver Judge Gary Jackson

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    In conversation with Chancellor Haefner

    Adversity, Accomplishment, and Advocacy: The Life and Career of Denver Judge Gary Jackson

    Join Chancellor Haefner and Judge Jackson as they discuss Judge Jackson’s experience growing up in Denver and eventually serving as a leader and change-maker in the legal community. Hear his experience living and learning as a young Black man in a predominantly white neighborhood, his connection to Colorado’s historic Lincoln Hills Resort, and his family’s long history with the University of Denver. Judge Jackson will also share his experience as a trial lawyer, community activist, and, eventually, as one of Denver’s only Black judges.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Race and Racism in Denver: Knowing Our History to Inform the Present

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    This panel examines Denver and Colorado’s long struggle to come to grips with the region’s racial history. The conversation will challenge us to directly confront what racism means for us studying and working at DU and to provide ideas about what an antiracist and equitable practice of history looks like in our own practice as colleagues, collaborators, and activists. 

    • Moderator: Tom Romero
    • Joie Ha
    • Lisa Calderón 
    • Soul Watson 
  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | After the Protests Have Ended: Imagining an Antiracist Practice of History

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    This panel brings together national and internationally renowned historians of the history of race in the United States into a far ranging conversation about the importance of the past in our current policy and practice. Situating their conversation around understanding the “uniqueness” of large scale protests against racial violence and white supremacy in our era of COVID-19, this distinguished panel will address how history can be used for meaningful societal change. By confronting such core themes about the importance of institutions, the centrality of narrative, and the complexity of racial formation for Black, Indignenous Latinx, Asian Pacific Islander, and White communities, the conversation will challenge us to imagine what an antiracist and equitable practice of history looks like for us at the University of Denver and beyond.

    • N.D.B. Connolly, author of A World More Concrete: Real Estate and the Remaking of Jim Crow South Florida

    • Thomas Guglielmo, author of White on Arrival: Italians, Race, Color, and Power in Chicago, 1890-1945

    • Daryl Maeda, author of Rethinking the Asian American Movement

    • Natalia Molina, 2020 MacArthur Fellow and author of How Race Is Made in America: Immigration, Citizenship, and the Historical Power of Racial Scripts

    • DU’s own Angela Parker (History) and Tom Romero (Law & History)

  • Thank you to those who attended! | We Rise to the Challenge Beyond Diversity: The Significance of Language (Renaming the Diversity Summit)

    This year, the University of Denver will be hosting its 20th Diversity Summit. Over time, our DU community, our nation, and our wider world have gone through many changes—a natural progression: evolving, over-turning, and critically considering our social responsibilities and enactments. Included in these many shifts has been the prospect of language. Those passionate about linguistics often portray language as alive and ever-adapting. With this in mind, the University of Denver, alongside the Office of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion, have been called to reflect:  

    Does the word “diversity” still serve its intended purpose?  

    In this session, ODEI and the DU community will be holding a conversation on how the word, “diversity” has transformed via discourse throughout the last two decades, and what DU’s role should be in addressing it. Ultimately, the session will commence in a grand renaming of the Diversity Summit for the years to come. As a Liberal Arts Institution with a commitment to Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion, we welcome the necessary revision it takes to uplift, embolden and educate our fantastic Denver community.

     

    Thank you to those who attended!

Week 4: Contemporary Conversations about Race

February 8 - February 12

Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For communities of color, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – racial injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.

Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on racial groups? What are the implications for racial justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States.

These are not caucuses, but rather center the lived experiences of these specific communities to bring to light both unique and intersectional knowledge. We call these our Community Conversations and all are welcome!

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: Asian & Asian-American Perspectives

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For communities of color, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – racial injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on Asian communities? What are the implications for racial justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States.


    Speaker List

    May Lin (She/Her/Hers) | Area of Expertise: critical race, intersectionality, social movements, youth

    As a postdoctoral fellow for the Social Movements Support Lab, a project of IRISE, I continue my work supporting racial justice movements led by those most impacted by injustice. This includes many different types of research, teaching, acting as an active accomplice, and/or organizing directly. For example, I have supported youth organizing for racial/educational justice and engaged in graduate student unionizing and housing justice movements.

    Dheepa Sundaram (She/Her/Hers) | Area of Expertise: Hindu Ritual and Performance, South Asian Digital Culture, Critical Theory

    Dr. Dheepa Sundaram (she/her/hers) is a scholar of performance, ritual, and digital culture in South Asia at the University of Denver which sits on the unceded tribal lands of the Cheyenne and Arapahoe people. Her research examines the formation of Hindu virtual religious publics through online platforms, social media, apps, and emerging technologies such as virtual reality and artificial intelligence. Dr. Sundaram's current monograph project titled Globalizing Dharma examines how commercial ritual websites fashion a new, digital canon for Hindu religious praxis, effectively "branding" religious identities through a neoliberal "Vedicizing" of virtual spaces.

    Rashmi Goel (She/Her/Hers) | Area of Expertise: Criminal Law, comparative law, race and law, gender and law

    Professor Goel brings to bear her global expertise in all of her courses, lending a broad-ranging historical and international perspective to all her work. She is currently researching and writing in the areas of dementia and criminal culpability, rape law reform, and comparative law through the lens of covid-19. Her seminar on multiculturalism race and the law is a long-standing favorite at the college of law.

    Varaxy Yi (She/Her/hers) |Area of Expertise: Racially minoritized populations, Southeast Asian American college students, equity and social justice.

    Varaxy Yi is a Khmer American, first-generation college graduate, and daughter of refugees. She is an assistant professor of Educational Leadership at the Kremen School of Education and Human Development at California State University, Fresno. She conducts research to advance equity, access, and opportunity for historically underserved communities, such as racially minoritized, Southeast Asian American, and refugee populations. Her dissertation was a phenomenological exploration of the racialized experiences of Southeast Asian American community college students. She earned her doctorate in Higher Education from the University of Denver.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: Black Perspectives

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For communities of color, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – racial injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on Black communities? What are the implications for racial justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States.


    Speaker List

    Art Jones (He/Him/His)

    Area of Expertise: Culture & Psychology of African American Music; Multicultural Mental Health; Social Justice

    I am a clinical psychologist and interdisciplinary teacher, scholar, and singer, and currently Professor Emeritus of Music, Culture and Psychology in the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.I am also the Founder and Chair Emeritus of The Spirituals Project, which works to preserve and revitalize the music and teachings of the sacred folk songs created and first sung by African women and men enslaved in America in the 18th and 19th centuries, and author of the award-winning book, WADE IN THE WATER: THE WISDOM OF THE SPIRITUALS.

    Apryl Alexander (She/Her/Hers) 

    Area of Expertise: Forensic Psychology

    Dr. Apryl Alexander is an Associate Professor in the Graduate School of Professional Psychology at the University of Denver. Her research and clinical work focus on violence and victimization, human sexuality, and trauma-informed and culturally informed practice. She is an award-winning researcher, her work has been published in several premier psychology journals, and she has been interviewed by numerous media outlets, including The New York Times, USA Today, and NBC Nightly News, about her research and advocacy work.

    Lolita Tabron (She/Her/Hers)

    Area of Expertise: Educational Leadership; Educational Policy; QuantCrit; Race and Racism

    Lolita Christopher Tabron received her Ph.D. in Educational Administration from Texas A&M University and currently serves as an assistant professor in the Department of Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at the University of Denver. She is a critical quantitative researcher and education policy analyst who studies how systemic racism and other forms of oppression are perpetuated through policies, leadership practice, and statistical data. She is committed to helping educational leaders develop an equity-focused lens and skillset to effectively lead in diverse K-12 school settings that do not perpetuate systems of marginalization.

    Travis Heath (He/Him/His) 

    Area of Expertise: anti-colonial approaches to psychotherapy; preferred mediums of healing; contemporary narrative therapy

    Travis is a licensed psychologist whose work has looked at shifting from a multicultural approach to counseling to one of cultural democracy that invites people to heal in mediums that are culturally near. His most recent work involves incorporating the work of Black abolitionist scholars into psychotherapy, community healing, and uprising. He has been fortunate enough to run workshops and speak in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Hong Kong, India, New Zealand, Norway, United Kingdom, and United States.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: Multi-Racial Perspectives

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For communities of color, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – racial injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding. 

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on Multiracial communities? What are the implications for racial justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States. 


    Speaker List

    Alex Fujita Brandhorst (She/Her/Hers) 

    Area of Expertise: Prospect Development 

    Alex has a BA in art history from Seattle University and an MA in arts and culture management from the University of Denver. She enjoys artistic endeavors, long-distance running, and high-intensity Pilates. At present, she is fighting a tree of heaven infestation with her husband, Ben, while their brown mackerel tabby, Olive, remains blissfully unaware of the “joys” of homeownership. Check out the blog that Alex edits.

    Jessica Harris (She/Her/Hers)

    Area of Expertise: race and racism in higher education, multiraciality, intersectionality

    Jessica C. Harris is an assistant professor of Higher Education in the Graduate School of Education at the University of California, Los Angeles. Through her research, Harris analyzes and disrupts racism and its intersecting systems of domination, such as sexism and classism, that are embedded throughout U.S. education and influence the educational experiences of People of Color.

    Jeanette Snider (She/Her/Hers) 

    Area of Expertise: College Administration/Multiracial Scholarship

    Jeanette Snider, Ph.D. is an associate director in the undergraduate program at the Robert H. Smith School of Business and has served in this capacity since May 2011. Snider has a passion for helping students reach their full potential at all levels of their educational journey. This is reflected in the programs, initiatives, publications, and consulting experiences she has led or participated in while at the University. Currently, she serves as the director of the Robert H. Smith School’s high school summer programs and oversees numerous diversity and inclusion initiatives throughout the Smith School of Business.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: Latinx Perspectives

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For communities of color, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – racial injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on Latinx communities? What are the implications for racial justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States.


    Speaker List

    César García Hernández (He/His/El), Area of Expertise: Immigration Law

    César Cuauhtémoc García Hernández is a professor of law at the University of Denver who writes and teaches about the intersection of criminal and immigration law. He has published two books, Migrating to Prison: America’s Obsession with Locking Up Immigrants (2019), and Crimmigration Law (2015). His opinion articles have appeared in The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, The Guardian, Time, and many other venues.  

    Lisa Martinez (She/Her/Hers), Area of Expertise: Immigration, social inequality, racial politics, Latina/o/x sociology

    Lisa Martinez is Professor of Sociology in the Department of Sociology & Criminology, a faculty affiliate of the Latinx Center at DU, and interim Assistant Provost for Research and Curricular Initiatives in the Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion. She studies the impact of immigration policies on the social, economic, and political well-being of Latina/o/x communities as well as Latina/o/x immigrants' educational, health-related, and job market outcomes. She is currently writing a book on the educational and political trajectories of DACAmented youth in Colorado.

    Deb Ortega (She/Her/Hers)

    Dr. Debra Ortega is the founding director of the Latinx Center at the University of Denver, and a Professor at the DU Graduate School of Social Work and the DU/Iliff Joint PhD Program in the Study of Religion. She is an award-winning teacher and mentor, whose academic work examines the process by which social power, exclusion, and dehumanization creates societal inequity and injustice.  Her scholarship addresses the way that everyday white supremacy affects Latinx people in health, education and immigration.  As the co-editor of Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work (2011-2017) she co-authored editorials such as Enacting and sustaining trauma and violence through policy enforcement; Benevolent Hegemony; From inclusion to radical attention to exclusion; and Complacency, violence and gender.  

    She earned her degrees from The University of San Diego in Religious Studies, Portland State University School (MSW), and University of Washington School of Social Welfare (PhD). She is proud to be a first-generation college student.  She recognizes her family (Robert Ortega, Rosie Ortega, Charles O’Bosky, and Venessa Ortega,), her mentors (Drs. E. Jane Via, Joseph Gallegos, Cheryl Richie and Lorraine Gutierrez), her partner Deborah Jean Carlson, and DU GSSW Dean Amanda Moore McBride without whom her professional and educational accomplishments would not have been possible. It takes more than a village to raise a child, it takes commitment, confrontation and love through the difficult times. 

    Maria Salazar

    Dr. María del Carmen Salazar is a Professor of Teaching and Learning Sciences in the Morgridge College of Education at the University of Denver. Salazar has authored 32 publications on humanizing pedagogies, equitable teaching, and college access and success for Latinx youth. She is the author of Teacher Evaluation as Culture: A Framework for Equitable and Excellent Teaching. This book is published by Routledge Press with series editor Professor Emerita Sonia Nieto. She has given 112 scholarly national and international scholarly presentations. One such presentation includes briefing the U.S. Congress on a publication she authored related to the state of the Latinx community in the U.S. In 2018, she was the recipient of the American Educational Research Association (AERA) Innovations in Research on Equity and Social Justice in Teacher Education Award.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Native American Photography Panel

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    This panel of Native American photographers will come together for a discussion of how contemporary Native photographers are making meaning of their work, which includes how they design and articulate their ideas and contributions to a future history of Native photography. This will be an opportunity to hear from different perspectives of photography coming from MFA, Fine Art, Photojournalism/documentary photography, and community-based approaches to make images.

    CLICK HERE to view the online photogallery curated for this event.


    Speakers and Artists

    Moderator: Dr. Angela Parker (She/Her/Hers), Area of Expertise: History 

    Dr. Angela Parker specializes in Histories of Native American photography with a special interest in the interplay of place/space and community identity and photographic representations of Native Americans.

    Pamela J. Peters

    Pamela J. Peters

    I am a Diné multimedia documentarian from the Navajo Reservation, currently living in Los Angeles, California. My first clan is Tátchii’nii (Red Running into the Water), which I use to identify my photography work. I define my work as “Indigenous Realism” because it explores the diverse lives of contemporary American Indians, rather than figures inhabiting some clichéd, pre-modern past. My first project Legacy of Exiled NDNZ  kick-started my exploration as an artist living in Los Angeles. Influenced by the Kent Mackenzie neo-realist film The Exiles (1961), the project initially started as a photography narrative that expanded into a short film about the migration of American Indians into urban environments over the history of Los Angeles.

     

    Viki Eagle

    Viki Eagle

    Viki Eagle is a member of the Sicangu Lakota Nation from her father, and is half Japanese from her mother. She graduated with an MA from the University of Denver in Colorado where she created her own photography project titled “Real Life Indian” (2011). Conscious of the low numbers of Native American students enrolled in higher education, she created a project to showcase the many Native students that are attending college. After graduation she worked as a high school multimedia teacher at Red Cloud Indian High School on the Pine Ridge Reservation, where she taught photography courses to students throughout the year.

     

     

    Rapheal Begay

    Rapheal Begay | Honágháahnii • Kin łichii’nii • Tábaahí • ‘Áshįį hí

    Rapheal Begay is a photographer and curator from the Navajo Nation. Currently based in Window Rock, AZ, he serves as the Public Information Officer for the Navajo Nation Division of Human Resources.  In 2017, he obtained his BFA in Art Studio with a minor in Arts Management and Certification in Museum Studies from the University of New Mexico. He has exhibited, curated, and collaborated in many creative initiatives highlighting Queer and Indigenous art throughout the Southwest.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: Indigenous and Native American Perspectives

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For communities of color, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – racial injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding. 

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on Indigenous and Native American communities? What are the implications for racial justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States. 


    Speakers:

    Ben Jacobs (He/Him/His), Area of Expertise: Restaurant / Hospitality 

    My name is Ben Jacobs a member of the Osage Nation of northeast Oklahoma raised in Denver Colorado. I am the Co-founder of Tocabe: An American Indian Eatery. Tocabe is a Native focused restaurant with the goal of serving both indigenous food and community.

    Chenoa Crowshoe-Patterson (She/Her/Hers), Area of Expertise: Native American youth/family resiliency

    Chenoa is Blackfeet from MT and Southern Alberta who moved to Denver to attend DU’s graduate school of social work, focusing her studies on historical and intergenerational trauma and resiliency, She is one of the four co-founders of the all Native women-owned Native American Counseling and Healing Collective (NACAHC) that offers behavioral therapy to the Denver area Native American community from an Indigenous perspective. Chenoa also enjoys working in her current position as Jeffco Public Schools Indian Education Team Lead, supporting programming that is family and student-focused, and culturally grounded.

    Nancy Lucero (She/Her/Hers), Area of Expertise: Tribal Child Welfare/Indian Child Welfare Act

    Nancy Lucero (Mississippi Choctaw) grew up in the Denver Indian Community. After completing her MSW at the Graduate School of Social Work (GSSW), she joined other community members in founding the Denver Indian Family Resource Center to support Native families involved with, or at risk of involvement, with the child welfare system. Nancy also completed her PhD at GSSW where she is now a Research Associate Professor and the PI and co-Director of the National Child Welfare Capacity Building Center for Tribes.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Talking Race, Taking Space: Building and Sustaining a Recognized Black Community at DU

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

    Read the DU Clarion Review Here

    Heritage Months Initiative in partnership with C+V:

    In honor of Black History Month, Dr. Andriette Jordan Fields, DU's Black Community Experience Coordinator, will host a conversation with Stephanie O'Malley, Associate Vice Chancellor for Government Relations and Community Affairs, Allana Forte, Senior Vice President, Chief Compliance Officer & Legal Counsel at Jacksonville University, and Matthew Solomon, President of the DU Black Student Alliance. They will speak from their lived experiences and expertise about race, space, and how to build and maintain a recognized Black community at DU.

    Learn more here

    Read the letter from leadership honoring Black History Month

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Whiteness Conversation

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For communities of color, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – racial injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding. 

    Noting this, how might we consider this reality for white people? What are the implications for racial justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States. 


    Speaker List

    Heather Arnold-Renicker (She/Her/Hers)

    Area of Expertise: Macro Social Work, Anti-Oppression, Organizational Leadership, Policy, and Community Organizing

    Since 2011, Professor Arnold-Renicker has also been focusing her career on developing and facilitating anti-oppression trainings for local and national organizations and consulting with organizations that want to change their internal policies and practices to better support staff of color, staff who are LGBTQ, and staff from other marginalized identity groups. She has worked with local and national social justice organizations and campaigns and her research interests are to better understand the impact of white dominant culture on social justice nonprofit organizations and the impact of other dominant social identities on the culture, policies, and practices of nonprofit and social service organizations.

    Brianna Johnson (She/Her/Hers) 

    Brianna Johnson is a staff member, alumna, and current grad student at DU. In 2018, along with key supporters, she founded Whites Organizing for Racial Conciseness or WORC. WORC meets monthly to engage mostly white faculty and staff in racial justice learning and action. Johnson does not see herself as an expert in the field of critical whiteness. Instead, she continues to engage in the work and learn from others to create more just communities for everyone.

    Thomas Walker (He/Him/His)

    Area of Expertise: Intercultural communication, dialogue

    Thomas has been engaged in the diversity and social justice field for three decades, working with NCCJ-Anytown, the National Coalition-Building Institute, the Social Justice Training Institute, and the University of Michigan-based Multiversity Intergroup Dialogue (MIGR) Research Project. His academic background is in intercultural communication, and he values education as critical to long-term and lasting equity work.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | White Noise Documentary Film Discussion

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    Join the Daniels Diversity, Equity and Inclusion (DEI) Committee, the DEI Graduate Student Group, and DU’s Diversity Summit for a panel discussion about "White Noise," a documentary based on a four-year investigation into the roots of rising white nationalism in the U.S. and abroad.  Panelists, including the director of the film, as well DU and Daniels faculty members, will discuss the film and the roots and implications of rising white nationalism in different spaces. 

    Join film director, Daniel Lombroso, Tricia Olsen (Dept. of Business Ethics and Legal Studies), and Michael Myers (Dept. of Marketing) who will discuss the film and the roots and implications of rising white nationalism in different spaces. The panel will be moderated by Hasib Nasirullah (2nd Year MBA student and VP of Diversity & Inclusion, Daniels Graduate Business Students Association).

    White Noise Film cover  

    Click here VIEW THE FILM from Feb. 5-13

    DU staff, students, and faculty can access White Noise via Film Platform anytime via our A-Z Database listings (<--click here)

    • Once at the F list, scroll down to Film Platform
    • Log in with your DU ID number and password when prompted
    • Search for White Noise in the upper right search field on Film Platform
    • Click on the film and playback options will be presented to you

Week 5: Contemporary Conversations about Intersectionality and Other Minoritized Identities

February 15 - February 19

This week, we consider the questions from last week, but with intersectionality in mind--how various identities overlap within a person.

Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For minoritized communities, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.

Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on intersectional groups? What are the implications for social justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States.

These are not caucuses, but rather center the lived experiences of these specific communities to bring to light both unique and intersectional knowledge. We call these our Community Conversations and all are welcome!

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Building Intersectional Coalitions

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    This panel focuses on how we can derive strength from difference. This premise derives from Audre Lorde's statement that "Only within that interdependency of difference strengths, acknowledged and equal, can the power to seek new ways of being in the world generate." Building intersectional coalitions will be necessary to generate new institutions, new ways of leading, learning, and loving -- and only then can we dismantle the inequality and violence of the past and build a future where more people are more free.

    This workshop will consider what intersectionality means in the practice of pursuing transformation and change. Moving beyond simply acknowledging how different social identities combine to create advantage (and disadvantage) in different contexts, we will take Lorde's words as our charge to consider how such difference is a source of creativity and strength.


    Marie Berry (She/Her/Hers)

    Area of Expertise: Gender, Violence, and Politics

    Dr. Marie Berry is an Associate Professor at the Josef Korbel School of International Studies at the University of Denver. She is also the Director of the Inclusive Global Leadership Initiative (IGLI), an effort to catalyze research, education, and programming aimed at elevating and amplifying the work that women activists are doing at the grassroots to advance peace, justice, and human rights across the world. As a sociologist, her research focuses on violence, gender, and politics.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: LGBTQ+ Perspectives

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

     

    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For LGBTQ+ communities, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on LGBTQ+ communities? What are the implications for social justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States.


    Speaker List:

    Thomas Walker (He/Him/His)

    Thomas has been engaged in the diversity and social justice field for three decades, working with NCCJ-Anytown, the National Coalition-Building Institute, the Social Justice Training Institute, and the University of Michigan-based Multiversity Intergroup Dialogue (MIGR) Research Project. His academic background is in intercultural communication, and he values education as critical to long-term and lasting equity work.

    Nadine Bridges (she/her/hers)

    Nadine Bridges is the new Executive Director of One Colorado (www.one-colorado.edu), the state’s leading advocacy organization dedicated to advancing equality for LGBTQ Coloradans and their families. Nadine has been an advocate for the rights and the respect for vulnerable communities throughout her career. She has a deep passion for understanding community, diversity, the world we live in and how these factors impact marginalized communities. She is a strong proponent of anti-oppressive servant leadership and ensuring communities, she serves, have voice in all efforts of equity and social justice movements. 

    She has been a teacher, director, counselor, mentor, volunteer, and activist. Nadine previously served as the director of Rainbow Alley, an LGBTQ+ youth serving organization, volunteered in Nicaragua with the Peace Corps, and recently managed the Community Health Division for Boulder County Public Health. Currently, she teaches at the University of Denver’s Graduate School of Social Work, professionally mentors former students and colleagues, and serves on several racial equity committees and is a Board member for The Alexander Foundation. Nadine earned her BS in Biology from the College of Charleston and her Master’s of Social Work from DU, along with a Certificate for Social Work with the Latinx Community. 

    Debora Ortega (she/her)

    Dr. Debra Ortega is the founding director of the Latinx Center at the University of Denver (www.du.edu/latinocenterLinks to an external site.), and a Professor at the DU Graduate School of Social Work and the DU/Iliff Joint PhD Program in the Study of Religion.   

    She is an award-winning teacher and mentor, whose academic work examines the process by which social power, exclusion and dehumanization creates societal inequity and injustice.  Her scholarship addresses the way that everyday white supremacy affects Latinx people in health, education and immigration.  As the co-editor of Affilia: Journal of Women and Social Work (2011-2017) she co-authored editorials such as Enacting and sustaining trauma and violence through policy enforcement; Benevolent Hegemony; From inclusion to radical attention to exclusion; and Complacency, violence and gender.  

    She earned her degrees from The University of San Diego in Religious Studies, Portland State University School (MSW), and University of Washington School of Social Welfare (PhD). She is proud to be a first-generation college student.  She recognizes her family (Robert Ortega, Rosie Ortega, Charles O’Bosky, and Venessa Ortega,), her mentors (Drs. E. Jane Via, Joseph Gallegos, Cheryl Richie and Lorraine Gutierrez), her partner Deborah Jean Carlson, and DU GSSW Dean Amanda Moore McBride without whom her professional and educational accomplishments would not have been possible. It takes more than a village to raise a child, it takes commitment, confrontation and love through the difficult times. 

    Krishna Pattisapu (they/them)

    Dr. Krishna Pattisapu is the Director of Diversity Recruitment and Retention, CU Boulder College of Education (www.colorado.edu/education (Links to an external site.)). They earned their PhD in Culture and Communication from DU in 2014. They have 12 years of work experience in higher education, including academic instruction, college pathway and pre-collegiate program administration, and first-generation student support. They are an advocate for intersectional social justice, LGBTQ+ students and students of color, and have volunteered and served in leadership roles in various LGBTQ+ community organizations in Boulder and Denver. They live in Longmont with their husband, Cole, and their cat, Maggie. 

    Cody Ortiz-Oldham (they/them)

    Cody Ortiz-Oldham, MA, is an Assistant Director, Gender and Sexuality and LGBTQ+ Initiatives, DU Cultural Center, and a 6th generation Denver Native, with strong cultural and familial ties to the North American Southwest including Mexico. Their personal identities include Xicanx (Latinx), indigenous (Hopi/Sandia), Two-Spirit, LGBTQ+, disabled and first-generation high school and college graduate. They proudly earned their first college degree at Red Rocks Community as a non-traditional adult student. Following this, Cody completed a Bachelor of Science in Psychology and a Master of Arts in Applied Psychology, with a specialization in Inclusion and Diversity, from Regis University. 

    Cody has over 20 years of experience conducting advocacy and educational workshops focused in LGBTQ+ community issues, race, gender, accessibility and interfaith spirituality. They specialize in topics related to gender, human sexuality and transgender and gender-expansive identities. In addition to college campuses, Cody regularly presents for non-profit organizations and community organizers, K-12 students and educators, civic and political organizations as well as professional development seminars for businesses. Cody has a huge passion for creating systems of equality and equity throughout all levels of the educational system—from preschool to higher education. They love to share strategies with anyone who will listen, in hopes of co-creating spaces of shared mutual respect and authenticity for All within our communities. 

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: Women's Perspectives

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    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For women, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on women? What are the implications for social justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States.


    Speaker List:

    Anthea Johnson Rooen (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: STEM Success and Access Programs, Outreach, Recruitment and Retention Programs for Diverse/Students of Color K-12 and College Students

    Anthea Johnson Rooen, EMBA Director, Equity in STEM Interim Senior Director, Access and Transitions Programs Interim Director, Denver Promise Program Anthea brings over 30 years of experience in diversity, recruitment, student success, and college access from the University of Colorado at Boulder and the University of Denver. She develops the Equity in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (E-STEM) Program for years ago, and also coordinates the Access and Transitions Programs Office, the Denver Promise Program, Sistah Network, Black Women LEAD (BW-LEAD) and the Black Male Initiative Summit (BMIS). All programs serve diverse populations including high school, and undergraduate and graduate college students.

    Nancy Sasaki (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Microbial Ecology

    I am currently a Professor of Teaching in the Biological Sciences Dept. at the University of Denver. I have a strong passion for all things microbial, women's success, and student success at the level of higher education.

    Tali Koziol Thomason (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Women's Coalition

    Tali Koziol Thomason has over 20 years of professional experience culminating in her current role at the University of Denver. As Director of Marketing, Communications, and Events for the Ritchie School of Engineering & Computer Science Tali drives strategy and implementation to build the school’s brand, share their success, and cultivate a strong engaged community. Tali also serves as the Chair of the Women's Coalition at the University of Denver. She is a Colorado native who is addicted to podcasts and audiobooks and enjoys knitting and getting outdoors with her family when she’s not on campus.

    Anne DePrince (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: intimate violence, community engagement

    Anne DePrince is a Professor in the Psychology Department as well as Director of the Center for Community Engagement to advance Scholarship and Learning (CCESL). A scholar-teacher, she and a team of student researchers study trauma with an emphasis on intimate violence, which disproportionately affects women and children. Using a community-engaged approach, DePrince works with community partners to identify research questions that can inform policy and practice while advancing our scientific understanding of trauma outcomes and interventions.

    Theresa Liguori Hernandez (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Women's Coalition

    Theresa Liguori Hernandez is the Assistant Vice Chancellor for IT Campus Partnerships at the University of Denver. She has been with the University for over 17 years holding positions within the Library and IT, and servicing as the President of the Staff Advisory Council for 2 years, and the Chair of the University of Denver Women’s Coalition for over 5 years. She is a strong advocate for women, has been part of the women’s organizations for 17 years, and received the Women’s Coalition Robin Morgan Staff Women Award in 2013 and the Robin Morgan Administrator Award in 2020.

    Shelly Smith-Acuna (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Couple and family therapy

    I came to DU in 1992 as a half-time faculty member and became dean in 2012. I am passionate about creating healthy relational environments that bring out the best in all of us. I am honored to have great colleagues in our DEI work at DU.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: Disability and Neurodiversity Perspectives

    View the Recording with Closed Captioning

    Read the DU Clarion Review Here

     

    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For people with disabilities and neurodiversity, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, policing, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on people with disabilities and neurodiversity? What are the implications for social justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States.


    Speaker List:

    Scott Van Loo (He/Him/His), Area of Expertise: DEI, Inclusion, Leadership

    I am a father of two young men and my partner Candice is from Venezuela and is the mother to two young women. I was born in San Diego, CA and I am of mixed Heritage; Lebanese on my Mother's side and Dutch on my father's side. I have spent my career in pk-higher ed and most recently was an assistant principal at a dual-language, International Baccalaureate elementary school in Dillon, CO.

    Stephanie Thorne (She/Her/Hers), Area of Expertise: Autism 

    I am a senior who loves being involved on campus and working to make DU more accessible to neurodiverse students. I’m also an avid skier and am currently (slowly!) learning how to rollerblade.

    Chyna Mae Tillman (Fae/Faer), Area of Expertise: Psychology 

    I am a non-binary third-year student majoring in psychology with a minor in English. I have mental health and physical health conditions that have lead to my neurodiversity, including issues with reading at times. I am also a doting older sister, an aspiring author, and I bake a mean cookie.

    Gabriela Berger (She/Her/Hers) 

    Hi! My name is Gabbie, & I am a 4th year Psych major. I love snowboarding and skiing and I have been using the LEP for 3 years.

    Maggie Tisher (She/Her/Hers), Area of Expertise: Neurodiversity (dyslexia)

    My name is Maggie Tisher and I am a freshman here at the University of Denver. I am a Colorado native and I was diagnosed with dyslexia in the 3rd grade.

    Alex Welch (He/Him/His), Area of Expertise: Autism 

    I am Alex Welch. I am autistic and an introvert. My favorite things to do are go for walks (weather permitting), watch TV or movies, play videogames, and sometimes hang out with friends (depending on if school doesn't make me really busy).

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: Veteran and Active Duty Community Perspectives

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    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For veterans and active-duty military members, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.    

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on veterans and active-duty military members? What are the implications for social justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States. 


    Speakers:

    Art Jones (He/Him/His); Area of Expertise: Culture & Psychology of African American Music; Multicultural Mental Health; Social Justice

    I am a clinical psychologist and interdisciplinary teacher, scholar, and singer, and currently Professor Emeritus of Music, Culture and Psychology in the College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences. I am also the Founder and Chair Emeritus of The Spirituals Project, which works to preserve and revitalize the music and teachings of the sacred folk songs created and first sung by African women and men enslaved in America in the 18th and 19th centuries, and author of the award-winning book, WADE IN THE WATER: THE WISDOM OF THE SPIRITUALS.

     

    Damon Vine; Area of Expertise: Veterans Services at DU

    I am a Navy veteran and director of Veterans Services at DU.

    Cathy Brewer (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: International Security 

    I am currently an Active Duty Major in the US Air Force and will continue to the United States Air Force Academy to teach in the Military Strategies and Studies Department. I have worked with multiple international units both in homestation exercises and on multiple deployments. I enjoy traveling and have been making many plans to travel once again it is safe to do so.

     

    Juliet Madsen (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Veterans & Covid-19

    Juliet Madsen is a retired disabled United States Army paramedic who graduated with her Master in International Disaster Psychology from the University of Denver. She is also a small business owner who has done extensive public speaking, teaching, and research; Juliet has been on the Board of Directors of a national veteran non-profit, and consults with numerous veteran programs. Juliet currently works for the Colorado Department of Public Health & Environment on the Crisis Counseling Program facilitating the behavioral health response to covid-19.

    Shevene Cole (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Organizational Change

    Shevene is a Research Methods & Statistics PhD Student at the University of Denver. A recently separated Air Force Veteran, her areas of research interests include, but aren’t limited to systems leadership, organizational policy development, and intersectionality within DoD organizations.

    Kelly Leaverton (He/Him/His); Area of Expertise: Army Engineering

    A retired 27-year U.S. Army Engineer serving as both enlisted and as an officer. During service I've completed five deployments, three combat deployments (Afghanistan and Iraq). My education includes a BA in Psychology from Saint Martin's University, a Masters in Geological Engineering from the University of Science and Technology, and I am currently pursuing an MBA from DU.

     

    Spencer Milo (Mr.), Area of Expertise: Traumatic Brain Injury/Mental Health care Treatment and Access to care

    Father, Husband, Retired Veteran, Purple Heart Recipient, Public Speaker and Veteran Advocate. I believe in Servant Leadership and that we as a people are stronger together. I will continue to drive to impact change wherever I can and for the better. It's not what happens to you, but how you react to it that matters. - Epictetus

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Critical Conversations: Perspective of People in Recovery

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    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, addiction, etc.). For people in recovery, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – injustice in its many forms (housing, employment, health, and wellness, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.    

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on people in recovery? What are the implications for social justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States. 


    Dylan Quigley (He/Him/His), Area of Expertise: Recovery/Substance Use Mental Health

    I am a former athlete who is a survivor of Sexual Abuse trauma, as well as a person in Longterm Recovery from drugs and alcohol. Currently, I am a first-year Masters student in the Counseling Psychology Program.

    Parker Franscella (She/Her/Hers), Area of Expertise: Addiction Recovery (Alcohol)

    I am a student in recovery and a member of the CRC. I am double majoring in business information and analytics and international business.

  • Thank you for attending! | Critical Conversations: Religious Inclusivity

    Over the last year, the United States has been confronted with the reality of multiple pandemics (i.e., COVID-19, continued racial injustice, etc.). For many religious communities, the existence of COVID-19 may be new in form, but not in practice – injustice in its many forms (education, housing, employment, health, and wellness, etc.) have been part of the US since its colonialist founding.    

    Noting this, how might we consider the impacts of these pandemics on various religious communities? What are the implications for social justice and our collective push toward equity? Our conversations will be conducted through the lenses of DU, Denver, Colorado, and the United States. 

     

    Thank you for attending! 

    *We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable individuals of all abilities to engage fully. We will provide live closed-captioning for this session. If you would like to request additional accommodations for this session, please email inclusion@du.edu. 

Week 6: Practicing Inclusion in Higher Education

February 22 - February 26

This week, we consider how to harness and activate our learning from the first five weeks of the summit. Paulo Freire describes "praxis" as "reflection and action upon the world in order to change it." As such, our speakers during the next two weeks of the summit will help us transform our learning into everyday practices of equity. (Freire, Pedagogy of the Oppressed,1972, 52)

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Building Your Inclusive and Humanizing Teaching Toolkit

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    In this session, we will review humanizing pedagogy principles and dive deep into a set of teaching tools to support inclusive, equitable, and supportive learning environments for all students. This session offers a robust menu of course design, classroom management, and assessment tools for participants to build a toolkit of applicable strategies.

    Learning objectives:

    1. Increase understanding of humanizing pedagogical principles
    2. Review teaching tools
    3. Build a robust toolkit specific to you

    Speaker:

    Dr. Valentina LaGrave (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Inclusive Praxis

    Valentina’s diversity, equity, and inclusion work is deeply rooted in intersectionality, social justice, and perhaps most importantly, by her own experiences in the classroom as an immigrant child; as an underrepresented racial and ethnic minority female in academia; and as a mother of four bi-racial children.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Inclusive Health Practices

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    "An Understanding of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion in Health Practice and the Lived Experience of Health"

    Taking a social justice lens to health and wellness means we have to start by asking: Why treat people's illnesses without changing what made them sick in the first place? Throughout the world, vulnerable and socially disadvantaged people get sicker and die earlier than people in more privileged social positions. These inequalities are avoidable, and we must consider how diseases are produced at multiple, co-existing levels. We will discuss the connection between social justice, diversity, equity, and inclusion in health practice (JEDI) with an eye toward understanding how where we work, live, play, and age impacts how healthy we are and our lived experiences with illness.

    Learning Objectives:

    1. Attendees will understand and describe the connection between social justice and DEI in health practice
    2. Attendees will compare and differentiate social determinants of health with health disparities across groups and their impact on health practice
    3. Attendees will evaluate current health practice through the lens of DEI

    Speaker:

    Renée Bott(She/Her/They/Them); Area of Expertise: Global health and development communication

    She has spent 18 years working in southern and eastern Africa and Haiti to improve health outcomes through health promotion and participatory communication. Her research focuses on culture-centered dialogue, relationships and messaging in WASH projects and HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment, and includes health social and behavior change, health promotion campaigns, health communication, family and peer communication about health and about health messages, and the role of CHWs in health education and outcomes. She is particularly interested in developing participatory communication models tailored to the local socio-cultural context.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Inclusive Supervision

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    Inclusive Supervision: Develop a supervisory practice that models inclusivity and promotes cultural competency for you and your team 

    Diversity, equity, and inclusion work has never been more important in higher education and in our working lives, yet little is known about how to translate this into how managers effectively lead. As more organizations begin to apply a DEI lens to the work of management and employee engagement, join us as we examine the mechanics of how effective leaders and supervisors show up in inclusive and supportive ways to help create more just and equitable work environments and high performing teams. In this workshop, you’ll be guided through a series of personal reflections and craft action plans through a new model of inclusive supervision that celebrates the tenets of inclusive excellence while balancing organizational effectiveness. 

    Learning Objectives 

    • Explore the tenets of inclusive supervision  
    • Articulate ways to demonstrate and model inclusive supervision 
    • Engage in personal reflection and action planning 
    • Commit to 1 action item to implement immediately 

    Speaker:

    Mia Elizardi (She/Her/Hers) 

    Mia Elizardi, MA, GCDF, SHRM-SCP, is the Manager of Talent and Culture within Human Resources and Inclusive Community, providing strategic leadership in the Talent Management philosophy and execution at the University of Denver. She provides career coaching and overseas learning and development, performance management, succession planning, and more. Mia is a dynamic leader bringing over 15 years of experience across higher education, nonprofits, and healthcare as a leader, coach, educator, and consultant. She holds bachelor's degrees in both Communication and Human Development from Arizona State University and a master's degree in Higher Education with a focus in Diversity and Adult Learning and Conflict Resolution. She is a Senior Certified Professional in Human Resources (SHRM-SCP) and a Global Career Development Facilitator (GCDF). 

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Mentoring Matters: Preparing for a Diverse World

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    Excelling Leaders Institute (ELI) is a long-standing mentoring program for minoritized students of color that boasts a vibrant alumni network of over 200. In this session, you will learn about the value of mentoring and the basics of setting up a mentoring program to support minoritized student populations.

    This session will feature storytelling from mentors and mentees. We will share the details of how we run our mentorship program and our organizational structure. We will demonstrate the mentor experience so participants can experience what a mentoring dialogue might look, sound, and feel like.


    Speakers:

    Devanae Allen is a senior majoring in Psychology and Sociology with a minor in Spanish. Devanae serves as the Head Coordinator for the Excelling Leaders Institute (ELI). Prior to ELI, Devanae served as a first-year liaison for Black Student Alliance and Vice President of Black Student Alliance.

    Lasya Andaloori is a junior studying Accounting with a minor in Leadership Studies. She serves as an Assistant Coordinator of Excelling Leaders Institute (ELI). Apart from ELI, she is a scholar in the Colorado Women's College (CWC) and a treasurer in the Internationalization Committee.

    Lorena Munoz Estrada is majoring in International Business and minoring in Leadership Studies and Chinese. She serves as the Assistant Coordinator for DU’s Excelling Leaders Institute. She is a 2019 Boettcher scholar.

  • RECORDING AVAILABLE | Radicalizing Psychotherapy: From Multiculturalism to Abolition

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    What could psychotherapists stand to learn from abolitionist movements? How might abolitionist ideas radicalize psychotherapy practices in ways that seek to dismantle white supremacy and colonialism, which have been present in almost all psychotherapy training even if rarely named as such, since the inception of the field? Taking a cue from legal scholar and prison industrial complex abolitionist, Tracey Meares, does multicultural counseling have to “be abolished before it can be transformed”? And if we do this work, what are the possibilities for transformation?

    This workshop will draw on the ideas of Angela David, Mariame Kaba, Tracey Meares, Angela Davis, Saidiya Hartman, Robin D.G. Kelley, Fred Moten, Cedric Robinson, Frank B. Wilderson III, among others, and will make an initial attempt to inject their ideas into psychotherapy practices thereby centering Black ideas and experiences.

    Learning Outcomes

    1. Articulate the difference between solidarity and empathy and construct ways solidarity might be used in therapy practice.
    2. Be able to identify ways in which teaching, supervision, and psychotherapy can promote surveillance and extension of the white gaze.
    3. Be able to describe ways in which the institution of psychotherapy can begin to work towards not only recognizing racism and oppression but dismantling them.

    Speaker:

    Travis Heath (He/Him/His); Area of Expertise: anti-colonial approaches to psychotherapy; preferred mediums of healing; contemporary narrative therapy

    Travis is a licensed psychologist whose work has looked at shifting from a multicultural approach to counseling to one of cultural democracy that invites people to heal in mediums that are culturally near. His most recent work involves incorporating the work of Black abolitionist scholars into psychotherapy, community healing, and uprising. He has been fortunate enough to run workshops and speak in Australia, Canada, Denmark, Hong Kong, India, New Zealand, Norway, United Kingdom, and United States.

  • Recording Coming Soon | Seeking Grace: Black Women Finding Self

    Since 2013, the “Seeking Grace” project, a collaboration of DU Special Collections and Archives and the Sistah Network, named for Grace Mabel Andrews, the first Black woman from Colorado to receive a BA from DU, has worked to document the lives and experiences of DU’s Black alumnae. Join past and present research team members, including project founder Dr. Nicole Joseph (now at Vanderbilt) to learn how the project has evolved since its beginning, and how research that centers and lifts up Black womxn’s lived experiences and epistemologies is a critical part of creating a more just and equitable university.

     

    Recording with Closed Captioning Coming Soon!

    *We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable individuals of all abilities to engage fully. We will provide live closed-captioning for this session. If you would like to request additional accommodations for this session, please email inclusion@du.edu.


    Speakers:

    Stevie Gunter (They/Them/Theirs); Area of Expertise: Archival research and digitization

    Stevie Gunter is a Research Assistant for Seeking Grace: Mining the Archives of Black Women at DU project and an Archivist Librarian for Blair-Caldwell African American research library. Their research examines decolonization issues and efforts in archives, digital storytelling and community-based approaches to cultural memory work. They graduated from the University of Denver in 2020 with an M.A. in Library and Information Science.

    Elizabeth Ndika (She/Her/Hers)

    Elizabeth Ndika is a current doctoral student within the Institute of Higher Education (IHE) at the University of Georgia. Research interests include the experiences of Black female graduate students at PWIs, transfer students, and work-related experiences in connection to geography.

    Kahlea Hunt-Kabir (She/Her/Hers)

    Kahlea Hunt-Khabir, M.A, graduated from the University of Denver in 2020 with of Master’s in Higher Education with an emphasis in Diversity and Learning. In her time at DU, Kahlea was the Program Coordinator for the Denver Promise Scholars Program, Reacher Assistant for Seeking Grace: Mining the Archives of Black Women at DU project, as well as working for the Office of Diversity & Inclusion. The overarching cope of her research is racial equity, specifically examining the socialization process of Black Women in Higher Education from a comparative African Diaspora lens. Seeking to find tools to sustain Black Women in holistic ways through their educational journeys. Kahlea has engaged in research in Brazil, South Africa, Jamaica, and the Netherlands, believing the answers to solving global racial inequities is in our similarities and differences.  More recently, she co-authored the paper Disrupting Whiteness in Introductory Statistic Course Design:  Implications for Educational Leadership released winter 2020. Currently, she works as a racial equity consultant for ForeverWriot, LLC, a company she co-founded in 2019.

    Patrice Greene (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Higher Education

    Patrice Greene, M.A, graduated from the University of Denver in 2019 with her Masters in Higher Education ( with a diversity and learning emphasis) and is currently a Ph.D. student studying Higher Education, Student Affairs, and International Education Policy at the University of Maryland, College Park. Patrice’s higher education experience covers Housing and Residential Education, recruitment, college advising, and fraternity and sorority life. Patrice’s research interests cover racial equity, most specifically how to best support Black women and girls in educational spaces and using museums, archives, and oral histories as a method of storytelling for Black women at Predominantly White Institutions.

    Nicole M Joseph (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Mathematics Education

    Nicole M. Joseph is an assistant professor of mathematics education in the department of Teaching and Learning at Vanderbilt University. Her research explores two lines of inquiry, (a) Black women and girls, their identity development, and their experiences in mathematics and (b) gendered anti-blackness, whiteness, white supremacy and how they operate and shape Black women’s and girls’ underrepresentation and retention in mathematics across the pipeline.

     

    Rachel Taylor (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Student Affairs and Higher Education

    Rachel Taylor is from Denver, Colorado, and currently serves as a COSI Grant Coordinator and Student Counselor at Colorado State University-Fort Collins. In her position, she works with the Colorado Opportunity Scholarship Initiatives Grant and works directly with students who receive the Denver Scholarship Foundation Award. In June of 2020, Rachel graduated from the University of Denver and received her M.A. in Higher Education with an emphasis in Diversity and Higher Learning. During her time as a graduate student and beyond she has worked in Housing and Residential Education, Access and Retention, and as a Research Assistant for the Seeking Grace Project at the University of Denver.

Week 7: DEI Praxis

March 1 - March 5

In our final week of the 20th Annual Diversity Summit, students, staff, and faculty will guide us in considering multiple forms of social justice praxis, including activism, assessment, and career pathways, toward transforming our everyday engagements into practices of equity.

  • Thank you for attending! | Part 2 - We Rise to the Challenge Beyond Diversity: The Significance of Language (Renaming the Diversity Summit)

    This session is a continuation of our session from February 5th to gain more input about how we will rename the summit after this 20th anniversary event.

  • Recording Coming Soon | Culture & Career Conversations: Family & Traditions

    Mainstream career advice says to find your dream career by focusing on what you enjoy, pursuing your own interests and no one else’s. But for many, family serves an important role in cultural or religious tradition, and family input in career choices is more than just an opinion to agree or disagree with. So, what do you do when your family’s goals for you don’t align with your own? Join the Cultural Center, DU Dialogues, and Career & Professional Development to talk about how family, culture, and traditions can impact choosing your major and career, and hear from DU student and staff panelists about how they’ve integrated family and career in a way that honors themselves and their culture. 

    This dialogue-based workshop will provide an opportunity for positive interaction and community building across different DU populations. While centering individual stories through a fishbowl dialogue, this workshop will also invite attendees to consider their cultural heritage and how their individual identities influenced their career-related choices. Or in other words, how cultural values shape perspectives on the importance of work and the type of work that is valued. Additionally, this workshop will invite attendees to consider the ways professional structures contribute to the opportunities and barriers an individual may encounter based on their individual identities.

     

    Audience: Undergraduate Students, Graduate Students

    Recording with Closed Captioning Coming Soon on Canvas Only

    *We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable individuals of all abilities to engage fully. We will provide live closed-captioning for this session. If you would like to request additional accommodations for this session, please email inclusion@du.edu.


    Speakers:

    Amina Bouayad is a first-generation college graduate who earned her Bachelor's degree in psychology and sociology from the University of Denver and returned to pursue her master's in higher education. Born and raised in Colorado, her passion for education was cultivated by a desire to serve local communities in a sustainable way. She aims to support and celebrate underrepresented college students through culturally-based programming. Amina likes to dance and read and typically spends her free time hanging out with one of her five siblings.

    Neda Kikhia joined the DU community once again as the Program Manager for the DU DialogUes program, adding staff to a list of student, campus leader, and alum. Trained in Community Organizing, Neda looks for opportunities, events, and programming that focus on elevating the voices and stories of people that move folks to action. She is a Colorado local who is passionate about community engagement and its potential to initiate sustainable community change. She is an avid podcast listener, travel enthusiast, and spoken word fanatic.

    Cody Ortiz-Oldham is a 6th generation Denver Native, with strong cultural and familial ties to the North American Southwest including Mexico. As the Assistant Director of Gender and Sexuality in the Cultural Center, Cody collaborates with departments across the Student Affairs Division in an effort to create an inclusive college environment for DU's LGBTQ+ student community. Cody has over 20 years of experience conducting advocacy and educational workshops focused in LGBTQ+ community issues, race, gender, accessibility, and interfaith spirituality.

    Kyle Inselman is an Assistant Director for Career and Professional Development. Kyle spends every day helping students answer the question, “What comes next after DU?” Whether it’s the first position in a chosen field, volunteering, graduate school, or taking some time to figure it all out, Kyle loves to share strategies, tools, and ideas to navigate your career journey. He works with undergraduates in the Josef Korbel School of International Studies (majors: International Studies and Public Policy), as well as Pre-Law.

  • Recording Coming Soon | Assessing Institutional Culture of Inclusion to Amplify Agency

    In this workshop, we harness frameworks from sociocultural theories of learning and Education Deans for Justice and Equity (EDJE) to assess where and how inclusion exists in institutional cultural practices. First, we explore the role of learning in organizational infrastructures. Second, we provide assessment examples that faculty and staff can use at four strata: course, programmatic, departmental, and institutional. Third, we invite participants to consider how they can apply these frameworks and amplify their sense of agency in transforming the institution.

     

    Recording with Closed Captioning Coming Soon

    *We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable individuals of all abilities to engage fully. We will provide live closed-captioning for this session. If you would like to request additional accommodations for this session, please email inclusion@du.edu.


    Speakers:

    Susan Jurow (She/Her/Hers), Area of Expertise: learning, pedagogy, qualitative research

    I am a professor of Learning Sciences and Human Development at CU Boulder. I am also the Associate Dean for Diversity, Equity, and Community Engagement in our School of Education.

    Christina H. Paguyo (She/Her/Hers), Area of Expertise: Inclusive Assessment

    Dr. Christina H. Paguyo is the director of academic assessment at DU. Trained in critical theories, learning sciences, and policy analysis, she is impassioned about equity-minded praxis. Her research is funded by the National Science Foundation, and her work has been featured in Pedagogo and Inside Higher Ed.

  • Recording Coming Soon | Activism and Inclusion: The Story of Us, Self, and Now in Racial Justice Movements

    In this interactive workshop, we will share a storytelling framework- the story of us, self, and now- that participants can use to delve into their own positionalities and stakes in racial justice movements. After hearing from student leaders’ stories of us, self, and now, participants will develop their own stories in breakout rooms. Afterward, we will reflect on the role of intersectional, racialized power dynamics in the uses of story, as well as ways to use this framework to bring into racial justice movements. 

     

    Recording with Closed Captioning Coming Soon

    *We strive to host inclusive, accessible events that enable individuals of all abilities to engage fully. We will provide live closed-captioning for this session. If you would like to request additional accommodations for this session, please email inclusion@du.edu.


    Speakers:

    May Lin (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: critical race, intersectionality, social movements, youth

    As a postdoctoral fellow for the Social Movements Support Lab, a project of IRISE, I continue my work supporting racial justice movements led by those most impacted by injustice. This includes many different types of research, teaching, acting as an active accomplice, and/or organizing directly. For example, I have supported youth organizing for racial/educational justice and engaged in graduate student unionizing and housing justice movements.

    Dr. Johnny Ramirez (He/Him/His); Area of Expertise: Education with a specialization in critical race & ethnic studies

    Dr. Johnny Carlos Ramirez is currently a Visiting Teaching Assistant Professor in the Media Film and Journalism Studies Department and teaches courses in the newly launched Critical Race & Ethnic Studies (CRES) minor program. For nearly 20 years, he has worked in youth development programs as a Program Director, mentor, youth organizer and community activist. His research examines social justice youth development programs and how Chicana/o/x youth resistance frameworks can be used as a prevention/intervention strategy to address the alarmingly high school pushout rates and school-to-prison pipeline outcomes.

    Kiana Marsan (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: English Major 

    Kiana is a third-year undergraduate with an English major and Critical Race and Ethnic Studies minor. She serves as Editor-in-Chief of the school's paper, the DU Clarion. She uses her writing as a form of advocacy, and her strongest work is a News column called "On the Margins" and her coverage of R.A.H.R. last quarter.

    Marissa Martinez Suarez (She/Her/Hers/Ella); Area of Expertise: Equity in Education

    I am a first-year at DU who plans to double major in History and Political Science with a minor in CRES. I am passionate about history because it connects me to my ancestral roots and supports me in my journey to become a social change agent. I hope to become an educator once I finish my studies and support students to reach their max potential.

    Mary Z Kudoadzi (She/Her/Hers); Area of Expertise: Computer Science 

    Hi, my name is Mary. I am the USG senator for Diversity and Inclusive Excellence and the external chair for Diversity Committee. I am also a student programmer out of the Cultural Center.

  • Thank you for attending! | From “I to We” and “Me to Us”: Inclusive Practices in Higher Education Learning

    “Do the best you can until you know better. Then when you know better, do better.” -Maya Angelou

    This session is designed with the DU community in mind, knowing our answers to community pain will come from collective change. We will focus on shifting the narrative from “I to We” and “Me to Us” by unpacking inclusive experiences and reflecting on key considerations in designing these experiences. This session will offer definitions, a resource matrix of interaction types and programming considerations, and a space to put inclusive methodology into practice. Join us in responding to the call to rise to the challenge beyond diversity by putting theories and learnings into practice. Starting right at home here at DU in your work, research, studies, and communities on campus.

    Outcomes

    • Begin defining what an inclusive experience would look, sound, and feel like
    • Reflect on key considerations in designing an inclusive experience
    • Practice decentering the individual and productivity and re-center community and healing
    • Practice inclusive methodology in a selected interactional context
    • Commit to integrating two methods on inclusive experience into current professional experience

    Speakers

  • Recording Coming Soon | A Conversation Between Chancellor Haefner: Kevin McDonald on Antiracism and Reckoning with Complex Institutional History

    In conversation with Chancellor Haefner:

    Kevin McDonald on Antiracism and Reckoning with Complex Institutional History

    Join Chancellor Haefner and Dr. McDonald, vice president for diversity, equity, and inclusion and community partnerships at the University of Virginia, for a conversation on Dr. McDonald’s experience as a nationally recognized diversity officer in higher education.

    Among many topics related to fostering diversity, equity, and inclusion, Chancellor Haefner and Dr. McDonald will discuss how institutions must reckon with complex and painful histories, as well as actions communities can take to foster an antiracist campus and encourage healing and learning.

    Recording with Closed Captioning Coming Soon