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Communication Studies

Communication Studies 2013-2014

Degree Requirements

AREAS OF EMPHASIS

Students must select a primary Area of Emphasis in which to study. In certain cases, a student may combine two areas with the assistance of a faculty advisor. The student's chosen area must be communicated to a faculty member in that area.

CULTURE & COMMUNICATION

Emphasis Description
The area of Culture and Communication investigates the communicative constitution and intersection of difference in its various codifications as culture, race, class, religion, ethnicity, nationality, gender and sexual orientation. Its vision is to promote an ethic of inclusivity, racial and social justice, reciprocity, and mutual transformation in the encounter of difference. Courses reflect this emphasis, focusing on the social and performative construction of identity, the politics of representation, performances of affect, identity, and community and vernacular and embodied rhetorics, all informed by critical, feminist and queer perspectives on cultural communication.

Vision
This area investigates the communicative constitution and negotiation of difference in its various codifications as culture, race, religion, ethnicity, nationality, gender and sexual orientation. Its vision of the goal of intercultural communication is to promote an ethic of inclusivity, racial and social justice, reciprocity, and mutual transformation in the encounter of difference. As such, it endeavors to equip students with perspectives, knowledge, and skills needed to function in an ethical manner within a global cultural context. Besides introducing students to the history of theorizing and practice in the field, the program seeks to update disciplinary competence to include more fluid and dynamic conceptions of cultural negotiation of difference within the context of trans-border crossings, intensified global interactions, and the displacement and movements of populations.

 INTERPERSONAL & FAMILY COMMUNICATION

Emphasis Description
The area of interpersonal communication explores how human communication works in our everyday lives, specifically, how people interact, and the impact their actions have on relationships between members of dyads, families, groups, social networks, and communities. A basic premise of work in this area is that human interaction is fundamental to the construction, development, and maintenance of personal and social relationships, and to the organization of social life as we know it today. The curriculum in this area draws from and is grounded in several significant traditions in social science and communication research, namely social-psychological, dialectical, and interpretive approaches. Courses focus on current trends and significant contributions to research in interpersonal communication, family communication, and research on close relationships.

Vision
The objective of study in this area is to facilitate an increased understanding of the communication processes and practices that occur within various contexts of interpersonal and social relationships, such as close, intimate relationships, including friendships, marriages, and family relationships. Our primary value commitment is to high-quality relationships. That is, our research and teaching is directed toward discovering and disseminating information about the ways that relationships can be mutually satisfying and constructive—or dissatisfying and destructive.
We emphasize the construction of relationships through communication and recognize that quality relationships can take many forms.

RHETORIC & COMMUNICATION ETHICS

Emphasis Description
The Rhetoric and Communication Ethics area of emphasis is dedicated to the investigation of public communication and is particularly concerned with questions of how ethics and justice are constituted throughout the spectrum of public communication activity. The study of rhetoric and communication ethics at DU is best defined through three intellectual commitments. First, we are committed to developing philosophical accounts of the nature of communicative activity. Second, we are committed to understanding how communicative action works to form and transform our public and civic identities. And third, we are committed to producing reflective criticism of communicative activity in all of its textual and performative modalities.

Vision

It is our mission to foster intellectual relationships between faculty and students that will result in research programs capable of describing the normative presuppositions of communication activity, using that knowledge to expose and critique illegitimate and unjust communication behavior and constructing normative models of ethical communicative practice. It is our mission to cultivate teachers dedicated to addressing important public issues in a reasoned, passionate and ethical manner. It is our mission to model a deep commitment to using knowledge of rhetoric and communication ethics to further the public good.

DEGREE  REQUIREMENTS

The MA in Communication Studies

Requirements:
45 graduate-level quarter hours with thesis;
52 graduate-level quarter hours with comprehensive exam

Non-Course Requirements:
Comprehensive exams/thesis

Thesis defense or an eight-hour written comprehensive examination is required of all MA students.

Comprehensive examinations may be taken throughout the year, with the exception of summer quarter. Exams taken during breaks will be reviewed the next quarter following completion of the examination. Areas of testing are determined by an adviser within guidelines established by the communication studies faculty.

Course Requirements:
Research Foundations — minimum of 10 credit hours from the following:

COMN 4900:  Qualitative Methods I COMN 4901:  Qualitative Methods II COMN 4930:  Qualitative Methods I COMN 4931:  Qualitative Methods II
Emphasis Area — minimum of 15 credit hours from one of the following lists:

Culture and Communication:

COMN 4220: Critical Intercultural Communication (required)
COMN 4221: Critical Methods for Studying Culture (required)
COMN 4222: Writing Culture (suggested for thesis requirement)
COMN 4221: Culture, Power and Representation
COMN 4231: Discourse and Race
COMN 4700: Topics: Intercultural Performance COMN 4701: Voices of Women of Color
COMN 4701: Cultural Memory
COMN 4701: Critical Pedagogy and Culture
COMN 4702: Critical Sexuality Studies
COMN 4702: Topics: Performance Ethnography
COMN 4702: Topics Culture and Affect
COMN 4702: Topics: Performative Pedagogy

Interpersonal and Family Communication:

COMN 3240: Group Methods and Facilitation
COMN 4020: COMN Studies: Relational Communication
COMN 4110: Theories of Interpersonal Communication
COMN 4210: Seminar: Interpersonal Communication COMN 4210: Seminar: Interpersonal Communication (Privacy and Disclosure in Interpersonal Communication)
COMN 4250: Seminar in Family Communication
COMN 4251: Advanced Seminar in Family Communication
COMN 4280: Theories of Group Communication
COMN 4300: Seminar in Persuasion
COMN 4700: Topics: Narrative Communication
COMN 4700: Topics: Identity and Relationships
COMN 4701: Topics: Seminar in Gender and Communication
COMN 4703: Topics: Communication and Mediated Relationships
COMN 4710: Seminar: Nonverbal Communication

Rhetoric and Communication Ethics:

COMN 3130: Organizational Culture
COMN 3315: Seminar in Public Deliberation
COMN 3400/COMN 4420: Modern Rhetorical Theory
COMN 3410: Classical Rhetoric
COMN 3435/COMN 4435: Rhetoric and the Public Life
COMN 3470: Theories of Free Speech
COMN 3780: Discourse, Power, and Ideology
COMN 3850/COMN 4850: Communication Ethics (multiple seminars)
COMN 4310: Communication and Collaboration
COMN 4890: Philosophical Presuppositions of Communication

Minimum of two cognate courses outside of the area of emphasis and/or outside of the COMN prefix (10–15 credits)

The PhD in Communication Studies

Non-Course Requirements: Tool Requirement
The tool is a methodological rather than a content requirement. This requirement should be met through course work in a methodology that results in advanced knowledge about a method that is related to the dissertation. In addition to recognizing tool requirement options in the traditional sense, (i.e., statistics) the student, in consultation with the dissertation adviser, may petition the faculty for an option deemed appropriate to the research/ investigative requirements of the dissertation. The tool consists of 8–10 credits of course work taken during the PhD program at the University of Denver; transfer hours from the student's prior MA program cannot be counted toward the tool.

Periodic Review
After completion of 30 quarter credits, the PhD student may be advanced to preliminary candidacy. Basis for advancement is the periodic faculty review of the progress of each student.

Comprehensive Examination
At the end of required graduate course work and preliminary to advancement to final candidacy, the PhD student is required to pass a comprehensive examination. The examination is designed to test the student's competencies as a scholar. The examination assesses both depth and breadth of knowledge within the discipline by focusing upon both the student's curriculum emphasis and supporting work in other fields of study.
The comprehensive examination offers the doctoral student an opportunity to demonstrate that he/she has become an independent, original and mature thinker in the discipline, as a consequence of the research and study engaged in during formal graduate course work.

Examination Procedures
Exam preparation and administration will be under the supervision of an examination committee chosen by the student in conjunction with his/her adviser. The committee will consist of a minimum of three tenure-track faculty members in the department of communication studies. The examining committee chair will, in consultation with the student, convene the committee to prepare the examination and will offer the student guidance in preparation for meeting. (See the department for a more detailed description of comprehensive examination policies and procedures.)

Dissertation
The PhD student is expected to submit a formal dissertation proposal, write a dissertation and defend the dissertation in an oral examination. No oral examinations can be taken in the summer quarters.

Course Requirements:
135 graduate-level quarter hours

• Four courses from the research foundations sequence
(20 credits)

COMN 4900:  Quantitative Methods I COMN 4901:  Quantitative Methods II COMN 4930:  Qualitative Methods I COMN 4931:  Qualitative Methods II
• Emphasis Area — minimum of 30 credit hours from one of the following lists:

Culture and Communication:
COMN 4220: Critical Intercultural Communication (required)
COMN 4221: Critical Methods for Studying Culture (required)
COMN 4222: Writing Culture (required)
COMN 4221: Culture, Power and Representation
COMN 4231: Discourse and Race
COMN 4700: Topics: Intercultural Performance
COMN 4701: Topics: Voices of Women of Color
COMN 4701: Cultural Memory
COMN 4701: Topics: Critical Pedagogy and Culture
COMN 4701: Topics: Performative Writing 
COMN 4702: Critical Sexuality Studies
COMN 4702: Topics: Performance Ethnography COMN 4702: Topics: Culture and Affect
COMN 4702: Topics: Performative Pedagogy

Interpersonal and Family Communication:
COMN 3240: Group Methods and Facilitation
COMN 4020: COMN Studies: Relational Communication
COMN 4110: Theories of Interpersonal Communication
COMN 4210: Seminar: Interpersonal Communication
COMN 4210: Seminar: Interpersonal Communication (Privacy
and Disclosure in Interpersonal Communication)
COMN 4250: Seminar in Family Communication
COMN 4251: Advanced Seminar in Family Communication
COMN 4280: Theories of Group Communication
COMN 4300: Seminar in Persuasion
COMN 4700: Topics: Narrative Communication
COMN 4701: Topics: Seminar in Gender and Communication
COMN 4703: Topics: Communication and Mediated Relationships
COMN 4710: Seminar: Nonverbal Communication

Rhetorical and Communication Ethics:
COMN 3130: Organizational Culture
COMN 3315: Seminar in Public Deliberation
COMN 3400/COMN 4420: Modern Rhetorical Theory
COMN 3410: Classical Rhetoric
COMN 3435/COMN 4435: Rhetoric and the Public Life
COMN 3470: Theories of Free Speech
COMN 3780: Discourse, Power and Ideology
COMN 3850/COMN 4850: Communication Ethics (multiple seminars)
COMN 4310: Communication and Collaboration
COMN 4890: Philosophical Presuppositions of Communication

* Three cognate courses outside of the area of emphasis(15 credits)

* Tools (Advanced Methods) — 8–10 quarter hours. (There are no predetermined courses prescribed for this requirement. Students decide on applicable courses with their respective advisers)

* Maximum of 15 quarter hours of COMN 5995 (dissertation hours)

* Maximum of 30 quarter hours may be taken outside of COMN

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

The Department of Communication Studies offers a dual degree with the Graduate School of Social Work.

Master of Arts in Communication/Master of Social Work (MSW)

Under the agreement with the Graduate School of Social Work, the student can earn the dual degree of Master of Arts in Communication Studies and Master of Social Work. The dual degree requires an admission application and acceptance by each of the departments. Thus, the dual degree is earned concurrently within established guidelines. Specific details and requirements are consistent with the most current agreement date and can be provided upon request.