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Electrical and Computer Engineering

Electrical And Computer Engineering 2013-2014

Course Descriptions

 

Computer Engineering

ENCE 3231 Embedded Systems Programming (4 qtr. hrs.)
Design, construction and testing of microprocessor systems. Hardware limitations of the single-chip system.  Includes micro-controllers, programming for small systems, interfacing, communications, validating hardware and software, microprogramming of controller chips, design methods and testing of embedded systems.  Prerequisite:  ENCE 3220.

ENCE 3321 Network Design (4 qtr. hrs.)
Introduction to network components.  Layering of network architecture.  Analysis of Local Area Network (LAN) concepts and architecture based on IEEE standards.  Design principles including switching and multiplexing techniques, physical link, signal propagation, synchronization, framing and error control.  Application of probability and statistics in error detecting and control.  Ethernet, Token-ring, FDDI (Fiber Distributed Data Interface), ATM (Asynchronous Transfer Mode), ISDN (Integrated Service Data Networks). Prerequisite: ENEE 3111, ENCE 2101 or permission of instructor.

ENCE 3261 Fault Tolerant Computing (3 qtr. hrs.)
Basic concepts of dependable computing.  Reliability of nonredundant and redundant systems.  Dealing with circuit-level defects.  Logic-level fault testing and tolerance. Error detection and correction. Diagnosis and reconfiguration for system-level malfunctions. Degradation management. Failure modeling and risk assessment.

ENCE 3501 VLSI Design (3 qtr. hrs.)
Design of Very Large Scale Integration systems. Examination of layout and simulation of digital VLSI circuits using a comprehensive set of CAD tools in a laboratory setting.  Studies of layouts of CMOS combinational and sequential circuits using automatic layout generators.  Fundamental structures of the layout of registers, adders, decoders, ROM, PLA's, counters, RAM and ALU.  Application of statistics and probability to chip performance.  CAD tools allow logic verification and timing simulation of the circuits designed.  Prerequisite:  ENCE 3220.

ENCE 3610 Multimedia Systems (3 qtr. hrs.)
Interactive multimedia technologies include hardware, software, standards, concepts and issues, compression, decompression, user interface design, query by content, multimedia indexing, and distributed multimedia.

ENCE 3620 Computer Vision (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts in image processing and computer vision. First, an introduction to low-level image analysis methods, including radiometry and geometric image formation, edge detection, feature detection, and image segmentation are presented. Then, geometric-based image transformations (e.g., image warping and morphing) for image synthesis will be presented in the course. Furthermore, methods for reconstructing three-dimensional scenes including camera calibration, Epipolar geometry, and stereo feature matching are introduced. Other important topics include optical flow, shape from shading, and three-dimensional object recognition. In conclusion, students learn and practice image processing and computer vision techniques that can be used in other areas such as robotics, pattern recognition, and sensor networks. Prerequisite: ENEE 3311.

ENCE 3630 Pattern Recognition (4 qtr. hrs.)
This class provides an introduction to classical pattern recognition. Pattern recognition is the assignment of a physical object or event to one of several prescribed categories. Applications includes automated object recognition in image and videos, face identification, and optical character recognition. Major topics include Bayesian decision theory, Parametric estimation and supervised learning, Linear discriminant functions, Nonparametric methods, Feature extraction for representation and classification, Support Vector Machines.

ENCE 4100 High Speed Digital Design (4 qtr. hrs.)
Fundamental topics related to the development of high speed digital systems. Topics include signal integrity and reliability related to crosstalk, parasitic, and electromagnetic interference caused by device clocking speed and system complexity. Project.

ENCE 4110 Modern Digital Systems Design (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course focuses on the design of digital systems using combinational, sequential, and programmable logic devices and Hardware Description Languages (HDL). Techniques for logic design including asynchronous logic, physical world interfaces to digital systems, and system performance analysis methods are studied. Students also learn HDL-Verilog to program CPLD devices and FPGA systems.

ENCE 4231 Embedded Systems Programming (4 qtr. hrs.)
Design, construction and testing of microprocessor systems. Hardware limitations of the single-chip system.  Includes micro-controllers, programming for small systems, interfacing, communications, validating hardware and software, microprogramming of controller chips, design methods and testing of embedded systems.

ENCE 4250 Advanced Hardware Description Language (HDL) Modeling and Synthesis (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course covers advanced concepts in Hardware Description and Language (HDl) modeling and Synthesis. It covers topics including but not limited to digital system design, simulation, and synthesis using Verilog HDL and VHDL. The course also covers RTL design, behavioral description, system Verilog, and timing analysis using CAD tools.

ENCE 4501 Advanced VLSI Design (4 qtr. hrs.)
Advanced techniques in the fabrication and design of VLSI circuits and systems. Modeling of parasitic components. Floor-planning, clock distribution, routing, and low power design. Prerequisite: ENCE 3501 or permission of instructor.

ENCE 4601 Detection and Estimation Theory (4 qtr. hrs.)
The subject of the detection and estimation theory course is on signal and information processing for the purpose of making desired inferences. The purpose of this course is to provide the fundamentals of theory and principles underlying the techniques for such processing. The following topics are involved in this course: receiver operating characteristics, hypothesis testing, Neyman-Pearson theorem, detection of deterministic signals with known parameters in Guassian noise, matched filters principles, detection of random signals with known characteristics, estimator-correlator, linear models, estimation bias, variance, Cramer-Rao bounds and Fisher matrix, Bayesian estimation, maximum likelihood estimation, minimum mean-squared estimation, detection of deterministic signals with unknown parameters, signal parameter estimation, Bayesian approach and generalized likelihood ratio test, detection of random signals with unknown characteristics, unknown noise parameters; signal processing applications. Prerequisite: basic understanding of probability theory and statistics, or permission of instructor.

ENCE 4620 Advanced Computer Vision (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course covers advanced concepts in image processing and computer vision including but not limited to image radiometry and geometric formation, edge detection, geometric based transformations (e.g., image warping and morphing), camera calibration, Epipolar geometry, and stereo feature matching. Other advanced topics include optical flow, shape from shading, and three-dimensional object recognition. In conclusion, students learn and practice advanced topics in image processing and computer vision techniques that can be used in other areas such as robotics, pattern recognition, and sensor networks. Prerequisite: ENEE 3311.

ENCE 4630 Advanced Pattern Recognition (4 qtr. hrs.)
This class covers advanced topics in pattern recognition including but not limited to Bayesian decision theory, parametric estimation and supervised learning, linear discriminant functions, nonparametric methods, feature extraction for representation and classification, manifold learning, bag of words, and Support Vector Machines.

ENCE 4680 Time-Frequency Signal Analysis (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course focuses on time-frequency signal processing methods. Many TFRs and their usefulness in many applications is covered. Course topics include: signals and signal properties; uncertainty principle. Review of 1-D transforms: Fourier transform (FT), group delay, instantaneous frequency. Desirable properties: linear vs. quadratic TFRs. Linear TFRs: Short-timer Fourier transform (STFT); Wavelet transform; filter banks. Spectrogram: relation to STFT; tradeoff between TF resolution and cross-term attenuation; application examples. Wignor distribution (WD): definition; properties; signal examples; relation to narrowband ambiguity function; cross-term geometry; applications; Smoothed WDs. Scalogram: relation to wavelet transform; properties; TF resolution' applications. Adaptive TRFs: adaptive spectrogram; positive TRFs; short-time techniques; time-frequency distribution series. Reassignment method; matching pursuit algorithms. TFRs in real-world applications: wireless communications, biomedicine, radar, sonar, detection, estimation, classification, speech processing, image processing, structural health monitoring, and many more. Prerequisites: basic knowledge of signal and systems, and digital signal processing, or permission of instructor.

ENCE 4800 Advanced Topics (CPE) (1 to 5 qtr. hrs.)
Various topics in computer engineering as announced. May be taken more than once.

ENCE 4900 Machine Learning (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course provides a broad introduction to machine learning. Topics include: supervised learning (linear regression, logistic regression, parametric/non-parametric, neural networks, support vector machines); unsupervised learning (clustering, dimensionality reduction, kernel methods); anomaly detection and recommender systems. The course also discusses recent applications of machine learning. Recommended prerequisite: basic probability theory and statistics.

ENCE 4991 Independent Study (1 to 10 qtr. hrs.)

ENCE 4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 qtr. hrs.)

ENCE 4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 qtr. hrs.)

 

Electrical Engineering

ENEE 3011 Physical Electronics (0 or 4 qtr. hrs.)
The basic physical concepts of electronics, electrons and holes in semiconductors, transport and optical processes. Concentration on device concepts, including material synthesis and device processing, P-N junction diodes, junctions with other materials, bipolar transistors, field effect transistors (JFET, MESFET, MOSFET) and optoelectronic effect transistors (JFET, MESFET, MOSFET) and optoelectronic devices (lasers, detectors).  Prerequisites: CHEM 1010, CHEM 1610, PHYS 1213, PHYS 1214 or permission of instructor.

ENEE 3111 Signals & Systems (0 or 4 qtr. hrs.)
Introduces continuous time and discrete time linear system analysis, Fourier series, Fourier transforms and Laplace transforms.  Specific engineering tools for discrete time linear system analysis include discrete time convolution, Z-transform techniques, discrete Fourier transform and fast Fourier transform (DFT/FFT), and the design and analysis of analog and digital filters for real-world signal processing applications.  Prerequisites: ENEE 2021, MATH 2070.

ENEE 3141 Digital Communications (3 qtr. hrs.)
Introductory course on modern digital communication systems. The basic communication system theory, probability and random processes, baseband digital data transmission, coherent and non-coherent digital modulation techniques and analysis of bit error probability. Bandwidth efficiency and transmission of digital data through band-limited channels. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

ENEE 3611 Analysis and Design of Antennas and Antenna Arrays (4 qtr. hrs.)
Maxwell's equations applied to antenna analysis and design.  Topics include fundamental parameters of antennas, radiation integrals and auxiliary potential functions, analysis and design of linear wire antennas, loop antennas, arrays, broadband antennas, frequency independent antennas, aperture antennas and horns.  Integrated lab included.  Prerequisite: ENEE 2611.

ENEE 3620 Optical Fiber Communications (4 qtr. hrs.)
A comprehensive treatment of the theory and behavior of basic constituents, such as optical fibers, light sources, photodetectors, connecting and coupling devices, and optical amplifiers.  The basic design principles of digital and analog optical fiber transmission links.  The operating principles of wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and the components needed for its realization.  Descriptions of the architectures and performance characteristics of complex optical networks for connecting users with a wide range of transmission needs (SONET/SDH).  Discussions of advanced optical communication techniques, such as soliton transmission, optical code-division multiplexing (optical CDMA) and ultra-fast optical time-division multiplexing (OTDM).  Laboratory.  Prerequisite: ENEE 3030 or permission of instructor.

ENEE 3641 Introduction to Electromagnetic Compatibility (4 qtr. hrs.)
The study of the design of electronic systems so that they operate compatibly with other electronic systems and also comply with various governmental regulations on radiated and conducted emissions. Topics may include Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) requirements for electronic systems; non-ideal behavior of components; radiated emissions and susceptibility; conducted emissions and susceptibility; shielding and system design for EMC. Includes integrated lab. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111, ENEE 2611 and ENEE 2222.

ENEE 3660 Communications Systems Design (4 qtr. hrs.)
Design and performance evaluation of terrestrial and space communications systems; error correction coding; spread spectrum communication; link budget analysis and environmental effects.  System design considerations include engineering judgment decisions to implement optimum communication configurations such as data rates, bandwidth, modulation schemes and operating frequencies.  Prerequisite: ENEE 3130.

ENEE 3670 Introduction to Digital Signal Processing (4 qtr. hrs.)
Introduction to the theory and applications of Digital Signal Processing.  Special attention is paid to the fast Fourier transform and convolution and to the design and implementation of both FIR and IIR digital filters. Prerequisite: ENEE 3111.

ENEE 4030 Optoelectronics (4 qtr. hrs.)
Optical fibers: structures, waveguiding, and fabrication; attenuation and dispersion; optical sources (LED, LASER, Fiber laser); power launching and coupling; photodetectors (APD, PIN, MSM); and practical optical transmitter and receivers.

ENEE 4035 Nanophotonics (4 qtr. hrs.)
Nanophotonics provides high-speed, high-bandwidth, and ultra-small optoelectronic components.  This course covers nanoscale processes, devices and their applications for harnessing and manipulating light on the nanoscale.

ENEE 4310 Information Theory and Coding (3 qtr. hrs.)

Information and entropy; coding theory; error detection, correction codes; channel capacity; application to communications engineering.

ENEE 4416 Advanced Digital Signal Processing Topics (4 qtr. hrs.)
Study of linear discrete-time systems used to perform operation on random processes for the purposes of signal detection, estimation, spectral estimation, enhancement and parametric modeling of signals and systems, linear difference equations, Z-transforms, random sequences, state variables, matched filtering, Wiener filtering.  Prerequisite: ENEE 3670.

ENEE 4460 Real-Time Digital Signal Processing (4 qtr. hrs.)

Digital signal processing algorithms and processing of discrete data, finite word length effects on filters, fixed point arithmetic and floating-point arithmetic.  Overview of different architectures of digital signal processors.  Programming of the DSP processor, implementation of DSP algorithms on DSP hardware in labs.  Prerequisite: ENEE 3111, ENEE 3670, or ENCE 3210.

ENEE 4620 Adv Optical Fiber Comm (4 qtr. hrs.)
A comprehensive treatment of the theory and behavior of basic constituents, such as optical fibers, light sources, photodetectors, connecting and coupling devices, and optical amplifiers.  The basic design principles of digital and analog optical fiber transmission links.  The operating principles of wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) and the components needed for its realization.  Descriptions of the architectures and performance characteristics of complex optical networks for connecting users who have a wide range of transmission needs (SONET/SDH).  Discussions of advanced optical communication techniques, such as soliton transmission, optical code-division multiplexing (optical CDMA), and ultra-fast optical time division multiplexing (OTDM).  Advanced Project.  Graduate course: Prerequisite: instructor permission.

ENEE 4625 Radio over Fiber Comms. (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course provides comprehensive and technical foundation in Microwave photonic Applications: Radio over optical fiber communications (RoF) is a novel technology in the field of short-range communication applications. The main goal is to enable range extension of 1 to 3 orders of magnitude over a typical ultra wide wideband radio signal in the range of 3.1-10.6 GHz. This technology allows separation of low cost Base-Station (BS)s from the Central-Station (CS). In the RoF technology is targeting the Personal Area Network (PAN) market that is characterized by very low cost and low power (10 uW) access point. In RoF, the optical fiber is used to carry extremely wide RF signals (several GHz).

ENEE 4630 Optical Networking (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course provides a technical overview of optical networking.  It gives students a solid understanding of optical networking field principles and practice.  Underlying principles are reviewed along with common optical solutions and practices.  It explains and provides practical tips on how to design and implement Networks.  Examples are used to demonstrate key concepts of ATM, SONET/SDH and DWDM implementation. Prerequisite: ENEE 3011 or instructor approval.

ENEE 4640 Electromagnetic Compatibility (4 qtr. hrs.)
The study of the design of electronic systems so that they operate compatibly with other electronic systems and also comply with various governmental regulations on radiated and conducted emissions. Topics may include: Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) requirements for electronic systems; non-ideal behavior of components; radiated emissions and susceptibility; conducted emissions and susceptibility; shielding and system design for EMC. Final Project.

ENEE 4650 Radio Frequency Design in the Wireless World (4 qtr. hrs.)
Topics include the following: basic concepts in Radio Frequency deign and communications, transceiver architectures, low-noise amplifiers, mixers, oscillators, phase-locked loops, power amplifiers, and transceiver design examples. Final Project. Prerequisites: ENEE 2611, ENEE 2222, and ENEE 3111 or equivalents.

ENEE 4800 Advanced Topics (EE) (1 to 5 qtr. hrs.)
Various advanced topics in electrical engineering as announced. May be taken more than once.

ENEE 4991 Independent Study (1 to 10 qtr. hrs.)

ENEE 4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 qtr. hrs.)

ENEE 4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 qtr. hrs.)

ENEE 6991 Ph.D Independent Study (1 to 10 qtr. hrs.)

ENEE 6995 Ph.D Independent Research (1 to 10 qtr. hrs.)

 

Engineering (General)

ENGR 3210 Intro Nano-Electro-Mechanics (4 qtr. hrs.)
Familiarize science and engineering students with the electromechanical aspects of the emerging field of Nanotechnology (NEMS). NEMS is a relatively new and highly multidisciplinary field of science and technology with applications to state of the art and future sensors, actuators, and electronics. Starting with an overview of nanotechnology and discussion on the shifts in the electromechanical behavior and transduction mechanisms when scaling the physical dimensions from centimeters to micro-meters and then down to nanometers. Several electromechanical transduction mechanisms at the micro and nanoscale are presented and discussed in an application based context. New electromechanical interactions appearing in the nano and molecular scale, such as intra-molecular forces and molecular motors, are discussed. A detailed discussion and overview of nanofabrication technologies and approaches are also provided. Prerequisite: must be an engineering or science major of at least junior standing.

ENGR 3510 Renewable and Efficient Power and Energy Systems (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course introduces the current and future sustainable electrical power systems.  Fundamentals of renewable energy sources and storage systems are discussed.  Interfaces of the new sources to the utility grid are covered.  Prerequisite: ENEE 2021.

ENGR 3520 Introduction to Power Electronics (4 qtr. hrs.)

This covers fundamentals of power electronics. We discuss various switching converters topologies. Basic knowledge of Efficiency and small-signal modeling for the DC-DC switching converters is covered. Furthermore, magnetic and filter design are introduced. Prerequisites: ENEE 2211 and ENGR 3722.

ENGR 3525 Power Electronics and Renewable Energy Laboratory (1 qtr. hrs.)
In this course the fundamentals of switching converters and power electronics in a real laboratory set-up are covered. The course incorporates hardware design, analysis, and simulation of various switching converters as a power processing element for different energy sources. The energy sources are power utility, batteries, and solar panels. Prerequisite: ENGR 3520.

ENGR 3540 Electric Power Systems (4 qtr. hrs.)

This course covers methods of calculation of a comprehensive idea on the various aspects of power system problems and algorithms for solving these problems. Prerequisite: ENGR 3530.

ENGR 3550 Introduction to Machine Drive Control (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course provides the basic theory for the analysis and application of adjustable-speed drive systems employing power electronic converters and ac or dc machines.  Prerequisites: ENGR 3520 and ENGR 3530.

ENGR 3610 Engineering Analysis (3 qtr. hrs.)
Applied mathematics for engineers.  Generalized Fourier analysis, complex variables, vector calculus, introduction to Bessel functions, and applied probability and statistics. Prerequisites: MATH 2070, MATH 2080.

ENGR 3620 Advanced Engineering Mathematics (4 qtr. hrs.)

Applied mathematics for engineers.  Systems and series solutions of ordinary differential equations, Fourier analysis, partial differential equations, linear algebra, vector calculus, special functions, unconstrained and combinatorial optimization, and applied probability and statistics.  Prerequisites: MATH 2070 and MATH 2080.

ENGR 3630 Finite Element Methods (4 qtr. hrs.)
Introduction to the use of finite element methods in one or two dimensions with applications to solid and fluid mechanics, heat transfer and electromagnetic fields; projects in one or more of the above areas.  Prerequisite: ENGR 3610 or equivalent.

ENGR 3721 Controls (3 or 4 qtr. hrs.)
Modeling, analysis and design of linear feedback control systems using Laplace transform methods.  Techniques and methods used in linear mathematical models of mechanical, electrical, thermal and fluid systems are covered.  Feedback control system models, design methods and performance criteria in both time and frequency domains.  A linear feedback control system design project is required. Prerequisites:  ENEE 2021, ENGR 3610 or permission of instructor.

ENGR 3722 Control Systems Laboratory (1 qtr. hrs.)
This laboratory course serves as supplement to ENGR 3721.  It aims at providing "hands on" experience to students. It includes experiments on inverted pendulum, gyroscopes, motor control, feedback controller design, time-domain and frequency domain.  Corequisite: ENGR 3721.

ENGR 3730 Robotics (3 qtr. hrs.)
Introduction to the analysis, design, modeling and application of robotic manipulators.  Review of the mathematical preliminaries required to support robot theory. Topics include forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, motion kinematics, trajectory control and planning, and kinetics.  Prerequisites: ENME 2520 and MATH 2060 or MATH 2200 or permission of instructor.

ENGR 3731 Robotics Lab (1 qtr. hrs.)
Laboratory that complements the analysis, design, modeling and application of robotic manipulators. Implementation of the mathematical structures required to support robot operation. Topics include forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, motion kinematics, trajectory control and planning and kinetics.  Applications include programming and task planning of a manufacturing robot manipulator.  Corequisite: ENGR 3730 or permission of instructor.

ENGR 3800 Topics (ENGR) (1 to 4 qtr. hrs.)
Special topics in engineering as announced.  May be taken more than once.  Prerequisite: varies with offering.

ENGR 3900 Engineering Internship (1 to 4 qtr. hrs.)
Students in engineering may receive elective credit for engineering work performed for engineering employers with the approval of the chair or associate chair of the department. At the end of the term, a student report on the work is required, and a recommendation will be required from the employer before a grade is assigned. Junior, senior, or graduate status in engineering is normally required. May not be used to satisfy technical requirements. May be taken more than one for a maximum of 6 quarter hours. Prerequisite: permission of instructor.

ENGR 3951 Engineering Assessment II (0 qtr. hrs.)
Students in Mechanical Engineering must register for and take the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination (FE). All students must complete an engineering exit interview and other assessment related tasks. To be taken in the last quarter of attendance.

ENGR 3970 Entrepreneurship for Engineers and Computer Scientists (4 qtr. hrs.)
The course presents an overview of fundamentals of understanding entrepreneurship and entrepreneurial characteristics; the focus is on aspects of engineering entrepreneurship, technology-based innovation and new product development.  Topics to be covered: learning an industry; recognizing and creating opportunities; new product development process, phases and cycle, risks and benefits; 'testing' of an engineering-focused business concept; marketing, organizational plan strategies and financing for new start ups.  Special attention is given to technological innovation, considering both incremental or routine innovation, and more radical or revolutionary changes in products and processes.  Prerequisite: ENGR 3610 or permission of the instructor.

ENGR 4100 Instrumentation and Data Acquisition (4 qtr. hrs.)

ENGR 4200 Introduction to Nanotechnology (4 qtr. hrs.)
The most important recent accomplishments so far in the application of nanotechnology in several disciplines are discussed.  Then a brief overview of the most important instrumentation systems used by nanotechnologists is provided.  The nature of nanoparticles, nanoparticle composites, carbon nanostructures, including carbon nanotubes and their composites is subsequently discussed.  The course also deals with nanopolymers, nanobiological systems, and nanoelectronic materials and devices.  The issues of modeling of nanomaterials and nanostructures is also covered.  Multiscale modeling based on finite element simulations, Monte Carlo methods, molecular dynamics and quantum mechanics calculations are briefly addressed.  Most importantly, students should obtain appreciation of developments in nanotechnology outside their present area of expertise.

ENGR 4210 Introduction to Nano-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course familiarizes science and engineering students to the electromechanical aspects of the emerging field of Nanotechnology (NEMS).  NEMS is a relatively new and highly multidisciplinary field of science and technology with applications in the state of the art and future sensors, actuators, and electronics.  This course starts with an overview of nanotechnology and discussion on the shifts in the electromechanical behavior and transduction mechanisms when scaling the physical dimensions from centimeters to micro-meters and then down to nanometers.  Several electromechanical transduction mechanisms at the micro and nanoscale are presented and discussed in an application based context.  New electromechanical interactions appearing in the nano and molecular scale, such as intra-molecular forces and molecular motors, are discussed.  A detailed discussion and overview of nanofabrication technologies and approaches are also provided.

ENGR 4215 Nanoscale Electromechanical Systems and Nanofabrication Laboratory (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course provides science and engineering students with comprehensive hands-on experience in design, fabrication and characterization of Nanoscale Electromechanical Systems (NEMS).  This laboratory-based course starts with a number of sessions including brief lectures reviewing the fundamentals and theories followed by pre-designed lab experiments.  The students are then provided with a choice of different comprehensive design and implementation projects to be performed during the quarter.  The projects include design, layout, fabrication, and characterization of the devices potentially resulting in novel findings and publications.

ENGR 4220 Introduction to Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course introduces students to the multi-disciplinary field of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) technology.  MEMS and Microsystem technology is the integration of micro-scale electro-mechanical elements, sensors, actuators, and electronics on a common substrate or platform through semiconductor microfabrication technologies.  The course gives a brief overview of the involved physical phenomena, electromechanical transduction mechanisms, design principles, as well as fabrication and manufacturing technologies.

ENGR 4530 Intro to Power and Energy (4 qtr. hrs.)
Basic concepts of AC systems, single-phase and three-phase networks, electromechanical energy conversion, electric power generation, transformers, transmission lines, AC machinery, DC motors, and contemporary topics in power and energy conversion.

ENGR 4545 Electric Power Economy (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course covers economy aspects of electric power industry and the implications for power and energy engineering in the market environment. Prerequisite: ENGR 3530 or ENGR 4530.

ENGR 4560 Power Generation Operation and Control (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course covers economic dispatch of thermal units and methods of solution; transmission system effects; generate with limited energy supply; production cost models; control of generation; interchange of power and energy; power system security; state estimation in power systems; optimal power flow. Prerequisite: ENGR 4540.

ENGR 4590 Power System Protection (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course covers methods of calculation of fault currents under different types of fault; circuit breakers, current transformers, potential transformers; basic principles of various types of relays; applications of relays in the protection of generator, transformer, line, and bus, etc. Prerequisite: ENGR 4540.

ENGR 4620 Optimization (3 or 4 qtr. hrs.)
Engineering problems will be formulated as different programming problems to show the wide applicability and generality of optimization methods. The development, application, and computational aspects of various optimization techniques will be discussed with engineering examples. The application of nonlinear programming techniques will be emphasized. A design project will be assigned.

ENGR 4730 Introduction to Robotics (4 qtr. hrs.)
Introduction to the analysis, design, modeling and application of robotic manipulators.  Review of the mathematical preliminaries required to support robot theory.  Topics include forward kinematics, inverse kinematics, motion kinematics, trajectory control and planning, and kinetics.  Applications include programming and task planning of a manufacturing robot manipulator.  Prerequisites: ENME 2520 and MATH 2060 or MATH 2200 or instructor approval.

ENGR 4735 Linear Systems (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course focuses on linear system theory in time domain. It emphasizes linear and matrix algebra, numerical matrix algebra and computational issues in solving systems of linear algebraic equations, singular value decomposition, eigenvalue-eigenvector and least-squares problems, linear spaces and linear operator theory. It studies modeling and linearization of multi-input/multi-output dynamic physical systems, state-variable and transfer function matrices, analytical and numerical solutions of systems of differential and difference equations, structural properties of linear dynamic physical systems, including controllability, observability and stability. It covers canonical realizations, linear state-variable feedback controller and asymptotic observer design, and the Kalman filter. Prerequisites: ENGR 3610, ENGR 3721/3722, or permission of the instructor.

ENGR 4740 Principles of Adaptive and Optimal Control Systems (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course covers fundamentals of adaptive and optimal control systems. Topics to be covered include: i) From adaptive control: parameter estimation, model reference adaptive systems, self-tuning regulators, gain scheduling, stability, alternatives to adaptive control; ii) From optimal control: principles and methods of optimal control, performance measures, dynamic programming, calculus of variations, Pontryagin's principle, variational approach to optimal control problems, optimal linear regulators with quadratic criteria, time and fuel optimal systems. Prerequisites: ENEE 3111, ENGR 3610, and ENGR 3721.  Students must have knowledge of MATLAB.

ENGR 4745 Adv Non-Linear Control System (3 qtr. hrs.)
Limit cycles; functional analysis approach to input-output stability; analysis/synthesis of time-varying systems; feedback linearization, bang-bang control. Prerequisite: ENGR 3721

ENGR 4810 Advanced Topics (ENGR) (1 to 5 qtr. hrs.)

ENGR 4991 Independent Study (1 to 5 qtr. hrs.)

ENGR 4992 Directed Study (1 to 10 qtr. hrs.)

ENGR 4995 Independent Research (1 to 18 qtr. hrs.)

ENGR 5991 Independent Study (1 to 10 qtr. hrs.)

ENGR 5995 Independent Research (1 to 18 qtr. hrs.)

Mechatronic Systems Engineering

ENMT 3210 Mechatronics I (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course provides basic concepts from electrical, mechanical, and computer engineering as applied to mechatronic systems and is intended to serve as a foundation course for further exploration in the area of mechatronics. Prerequisite: senior or graduate standing in engineering.

ENMT 3220 Mechatronics II - Real-Time Systems (4 qtr. hrs.)
Real-time systems require timely response by a computer to external stimuli. This course examines the issues associated with deterministic performance including basic computer architecture, scheduling algorithms, and software design techniques including data flow diagrams, real-time data flow diagrams, stat transition diagrams, and petri nets. In the lab portion of this class, students program a microcontroller to interact with mechatronic devices. Prerequisite: ENMT 3210, ENCE 3210 or COMP 3354.

ENMT 4220 Mechatronics II (4 qtr. hrs.)
This course combines systems design and integration with a real world project involving the design and fabrication of an integrated system. Prerequisite: Mechatronics I or equivalent.

ENMT 4730 Advanced Ground Robotics (4 qtr. hrs.)
Introduction to path planning and sensing and estimation for robotic manipulations and mobile robots.  Review of the mathematical preliminaries required to support robot theory. Topics include advanced sensors, mobile robot mechanisms, advanced manipulator mechanisms, path planning in 2-D and 3-D, and simultaneous localization and mapping.  Applications include task and motion planning for idealized and real robots.  Prerequisite: ENGR 3730.

ENMT 4734 Unmanned Aerial Systems (4 qtr. hrs.)
Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), or Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) as is the preferred term by the US DOD, have seen unprecedented levels of growths in military and civilian application domains.  Fixed-wing aircraft, heavier or lighter than air, rotary-wing (rotocraft, helicopters), vertical take-off and landing (VTOL) unmanned vehicles are being increasingly used in military and civilian domains for surveillance, reconnaissance, mapping, cartography, border patrol, inspection, homeland security, search and rescue, fire detection, agricultural imaging, traffic monitoring, to name just a few application domains.  This course offers a very comprehensive study of UAS that includes: history of unmanned aviation, including evolution of designs and models for application-specific domains; modeling, control and navigation fundamentals for both teleoperation, semi-autonomous and fully autonomous flights; see-and-avoid-systems for different classes of UAS; integration of UAS into the National Airspace System (NAS); applications and case studies.  Prerequisite: ENGR 3730.


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