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People News

March 2013

NICOLE BOSTEL RECEIVES COSIDA RISING STAR AWARD

Nicole Bostel(March 26, 2013) Nicole Bostel, director of media relations for the Division of Athletics and Recreation, was selected as the 2013 recipient of CoSIDA's (College Sports Information Directors of America) Rising Star Award for the organization's university division membership. The Rising Star Award is presented annually to both a university and college division member of CoSIDA whose outstanding work at their school as well as their service, dedication, energy and enthusiasm to their profession, makes that person a "rising star" in the field. Congratulations, Nicole!

BUILDING CONFLICT RESOLUTION SERVICES AT THE UNIVERSITY OF DENVER

An alternative means of resolving on-campus disputesAdam Brown
(March 19, 2013) In the winter of 2011, Brittany Eskridge, Jonathan Howard and Adam Brown began developing an on-campus dispute resolution center at the University of Denver. At that time the dispute resolution center was still in its drafting stage; however, this past fall quarter, CRI (the Conflict Resolution Institute) reconnected with Adam Brown to discuss the progress of the project which is now known as Conflict Resolution Services (CRS).

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2013-2014 FULBRIGHT AWARDS: CHRISTOF DEMONT-HEINRICH, BILL STRATTON AND ALISON KROGEL

(March 19, 2013) Christof Demont-Heinrich, associate professor in Media, Film & Journalism Studies, is the recipient of a 2013-2014 Fulbright scholar grant. He will conduct research for a book project, Hanging on to German in an English Dominant World, at the University of Hamburg, Germany.


Assistant Professor of English Billy J. Stratton will share his passion for Native American literature and literature of the American West as a Fulbright senior lecturer in American Studies at the Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg, Würzburg Germany, April-July, 2013. More


Alison Krogel, assistant professor in the Department of Languages and Literatures, has been awarded a Fulbright fellowship for the 2013-2014 academic year in support of her project, "The Letter of the Law (in Translation): Access to Justice for Indigenous Litigants in the Andes since Colonial Times."

Thanks to her selection by the Fulbright Commission, Professor Krogel will spend a portion of 2014 in Ecuador, where she will pursue archival research, observe courtroom and other legal proceedings involving Kichwwa litigants, and interview a wide range of participants in the legal community. Krogel's goal is to understand ways in which Andean cultures, languages and worldviews interfaced with and responded to the colonial justice system.

This ambitious project, grounded in linguistic expertise in both Spanish and Quechua, informed by a historical framework that goes back to the early 16th century, and undertaken with the hope of improving the access of indigenous population to justice systems in Latin America as well as the United States, grew out of research that Alison accomplished for her first book.

DAVID CIEPLEY NAMED LAURENCE S. ROCKEFELLER VISITING FACULTY FELLOW

(March 12, 2013) David Ciepley, assistant professor in the Political Science department, has been named the Laurence S. Rockefeller Visiting Faculty Fellow in the University Center for Human Values at Princeton University for the 2013-2014 academic year.

As the center's materials explain, "The University Center for Human Values fosters ongoing inquiry into important ethical issues in private and public life and supports teaching, research, and discussion of ethics and human values through the curriculum and across the disciplines at Princeton University." Fellows are named for a year, and they spend that time in residence at Princeton devoting themselves on a full-time basis to research topics involving human values in public and private life.

David will be working on his book project, Neither Public nor Private: Toward a Political Theory of the Modern Corporate Order. His work draws on history, legal theory, and political theory to challenge the reclassification of corporations over the past two centuries from "bodies politic" to private concerns—a legal status that exempts them from any duty to the public, or accountability to the public, or even publicity to the public, and that endows them with legal protections and rights of political participation that they ought not have. Properly understood, corporations are neither fully private nor fully public, but amphibian. They are what David calls "franchise governments," with a legal form and powers granted by the state, yet run on private initiative. David's argument is that instead of being treated as private, corporations need to be placed in a distinct category—neither public nor private, but "corporate"—to be regulated by distinct rules and norms.

ANDREA PHILLEO NAMED SOCIAL WORKER OF THE YEAR

(March 5, 2013) Andrea Philleo, adjunct instructor in the Graduate School of Social Work, received the 2013 Social Worker of the Year award from the Colorado Chapter of the National Association of Social Workers for her work as founder of the Colorado Wellness Center for Girls. The center is a comprehensive day treatment center for adolescent girls between the ages of 12-17. The center's mission serves two primary but equally important purposes: to provide gender-specific, wellness-based and trauma-sensitive services, and to provide the imperative support to primary caretakers through the often difficult and stressful time of female adolescent development. Learn more about the Colorado Wellness Center for Girls.